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Understanding
Micro Elements
Camera Shots
• Camera shots are very important in Media
texts such as magazines, television, film
and advertisement. Diffe...
The extreme Close-up
The extreme close up is used to reveal very small
details in the scene. It might be used to reveal ho...
The Close up
The close up shot is
used to reveal detail. If
you are shooting just
the head and shoulders
of a subject this...
Head and shoulders
The head and
shoulders shot is used
in news broadcasts. If
you think about the
television news you
will...
The Medium Shot
The medium shot
is from just below
the waist to above
the head. There is
more headroom
than in the bust
sh...
The long shot
This shot is useful
for someone that
is walking or
moving.
The extreme long shot
Also known as the
Establish shot, this
gives the viewer
some perspective as
to where the subject
is....
Two shot
Two-shots are composed
when two people are in
the scene and their
interaction is important. A
two-shot is a good ...
Over the shoulder
The over the shoulder shot reveals one subject as seen
from over the shoulder of another subject. It sim...
Camera Angles
The relationship between the camera and the object being photographed (ie
the ANGLE) gives emotional informa...
Camera Angles
• 3. Eye Level
A fairly neutral shot; the camera is positioned as though
it is a human actually observing a ...
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Understanding micro elements power point example

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Understanding micro elements power point example

  1. 1. Understanding Micro Elements
  2. 2. Camera Shots • Camera shots are very important in Media texts such as magazines, television, film and advertisement. Different shots give different meanings. • Camera angles and movements combine to create a sequence of images, just as words, word order and punctuation combine to make the meaning of a sentence.
  3. 3. The extreme Close-up The extreme close up is used to reveal very small details in the scene. It might be used to reveal horror in a subject (extreme close up of the subject's mouth as she/he screams). It might also be used in a mystery to show some detail that the detective picks up on or to show some small clue.
  4. 4. The Close up The close up shot is used to reveal detail. If you are shooting just the head and shoulders of a subject this is a close up.
  5. 5. Head and shoulders The head and shoulders shot is used in news broadcasts. If you think about the television news you will realize that this shot reveals enough detail to see the subject's lips move and the expression on her/his face.
  6. 6. The Medium Shot The medium shot is from just below the waist to above the head. There is more headroom than in the bust shot. This show is used if the person is animated with their hand movements, etc.
  7. 7. The long shot This shot is useful for someone that is walking or moving.
  8. 8. The extreme long shot Also known as the Establish shot, this gives the viewer some perspective as to where the subject is. This is very important if the subject is moving to new locations or times. It lets the viewer know where the video is taking place.
  9. 9. Two shot Two-shots are composed when two people are in the scene and their interaction is important. A two-shot is a good way to introduce a conversation. From the introduction you might cut to an over the shoulder shot of one person talking or a close- up of the other person reacting to what is being said.
  10. 10. Over the shoulder The over the shoulder shot reveals one subject as seen from over the shoulder of another subject. It simulates a view of the subject as seen from the second person's eyes. This shot is often used in conversations between two people where the dirtector wants to focus on the person speaking. Usually these shots are head shots (close ups of the speaker).
  11. 11. Camera Angles The relationship between the camera and the object being photographed (ie the ANGLE) gives emotional information to an audience, and guides their judgment about the character or object in shot. The more extreme the angle (ie the further away it is from eye left), the more symbolic and heavily-loaded the shot. • 1. The Bird's-Eye view This shows a scene from directly overhead, a very unnatural and strange angle. Familiar objects viewed from this angle might seem totally unrecognisable at first (umbrellas in a crowd, dancers' legs). This shot does, however, put the audience in a godlike position, looking down on the action. A cameraman, raised above the action, gets a high angle shot • 2. High Angle Not so extreme as a bird's eye view. The camera is elevated above the action using a crane to give a general overview. High angles make the object photographed seem smaller, and less significant (or scary). The object or character often gets swallowed up by their setting - they become part of a wider picture.
  12. 12. Camera Angles • 3. Eye Level A fairly neutral shot; the camera is positioned as though it is a human actually observing a scene, so that eg actors' heads are on a level with the focus. The camera will be placed approximately five to six feet from the ground. • 4. Low Angle These increase height (useful for short actors like Tom Cruise or James McAvoy) and give a sense of speeded motion. Low angles help give a sense of confusion to a viewer, of powerlessness within the action of a scene. The background of a low angle shot will tend to be just sky or ceiling, the lack of detail about the setting adding to the disorientation of the viewer.

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