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Blockchain v Cryptocurrency: Talk for BridgeSF

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This talk articulates 1) what is a blockchain 2) why it is interesting 3) talks through use-cases grounded in real world projects. 4) Highlights questions government leaders should ask before deciding to use a blockchain.

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Blockchain v Cryptocurrency: Talk for BridgeSF

  1. 1. Blockchain vs. Cryptocurrencies Kaliya Young BridgeSF May 23, 2018
  2. 2. What is a Blockchain?
  3. 3. The first blockchain was the Bitcoin blockchain How does it work? we will get to that
  4. 4. Why is it Interesting? Solves the Double Spend Problem
  5. 5. BitCoin Number What is a BitCoin?
  6. 6. BitCoin Address 1 BitCoin Number
  7. 7. BitCoin Address 1 BitCoin Number WALLET for BITCOIN ADDRESS PRIVATE Key of BitCoin Address 1
  8. 8. BitCoin Address 1 SENDS WALLET for BITCOIN ADDRESS PRIVATE Key of BitCoin Address 1 BitCoin Number
  9. 9. BitCoin Address 1 BitCoin NumberSENDS BitCoin Address 2TO
  10. 10. BitCoin Address 1 BitCoin NumberSENDS BitCoin Address 2TO THIS IS A TRANSACTION
  11. 11. The transactions are broadcast to the network of computers.
  12. 12. BitCoin Address 3 SENDS WALLET for BITCOIN ADDRESS PRIVATE Key of BitCoin Address 1 BitCoin Number
  13. 13. BitCoin Address 3 BitCoin NumberSENDS
  14. 14. BitCoin Address 3 BitCoin NumberSENDS BitCoin Address 5TO
  15. 15. BitCoin Address 3 BitCoin NumberSENDS BitCoin Address 4TO THIS IS A TRANSACTION
  16. 16. THIS IS A TRANSACTION
  17. 17. THIS IS A TRANSACTION
  18. 18. These transactions are broadcast to the network of computers.
  19. 19. About Ten Minutes
  20. 20. ?????? <—— What is the HASH (Special Number) of the Bundle of Transactions
  21. 21. <——- The Special is Found by a Miner Node and they are rewarded with a totally New Bitcoin Number
  22. 22. This number becomes the top of the next block.
  23. 23. ??????
  24. 24. This number becomes the top of the next block.
  25. 25. ??????
  26. 26. This number becomes the top of the next block.
  27. 27. ??????
  28. 28. These transactions are broadcast to the network of computers. The ledger is updated across the network.
  29. 29. ???
  30. 30. ….
  31. 31. This LEDGER of Transactions One SHARED LEDGER of Transactions this is CHAIN of BLOCKS of Transaction This is all maintained by a network of commuters a, DISTRIBUTED LEDGER
  32. 32. …. WHAT IS SPECIAL ABOUT THIS?
  33. 33. It is Immutable You can’t erase transactions.
  34. 34. Its Transparent Anyone can see the transactions
  35. 35. Its “Trustless” The software of the network runs it. NOT a central institutional authority.
  36. 36. Do You Need a Blockchain?
  37. 37. * Do you need a shared, constant data store? * Does more than one entity need to contribute data? * (Do you need Auditing) * Sensitive identifiers WILL NOT be written to the data store? * Data records, once written, are never updated or deleted?
  38. 38. * Are the entities with write access having a hard time who should be control of the data store? * Do you want a tamperproof log of all the writes to the data store? ONLY if the answers is YES to the above questions You may have a useful Blockchain use case.
  39. 39. Lessons Learned from R&D Investments
 Most Organizations Don’t Need A Blockchain 59 Do you need a shared, consistent data store? Does more than one entity need to contribute data? Data records, once written, are never updated or deleted? Sensitive identifiers WILL NOT be written to the data store? Blockchains provide a historically consistent data store. If you don’t need that, you don’t need a Blockchain
 CONSIDER: Email / Spreadsheets Your data comes from a single entity. Blockchains are typically used when data comes from multiple entities. CONSIDER: Database
 CAVEAT: Auditing Use Cases Blockchains do not allow modifications of historical data; they are strongly auditable CONSIDER: Database You should not write sensitive information to a Blockchain that requires medium to long term confidentiality, such as PII, even if it is encrypted CONSIDER: Encrypted Database Are the entities with write access having a hard time deciding who should be in control of the data store? If there are no trust or control issues over who runs the data store, traditional database solutions should suffice
 CONSIDER: Managed Database Do you want a tamperproof log of all writes to the data store? If you don’t need to audit what happened and when it happened, you don’t need a Blockchain 
 CONSIDER: Database You may have a useful Blockchain use case YES YES YES YES YES YES AUDITING NO NO NO NO NO NO
  40. 40. What can you do with this type of Data Store?
  41. 41. There is Lots of Experimentation Now
  42. 42. Show Proof A Particular Action/Transaction Happened at a Certain Time
  43. 43. Supply Chains Tracing Provenance
  44. 44. Traceable Medicine to prevent counterfeiting
  45. 45. 1. Performance History, vehicle maintenance, quality assurance 2. Dynamic Optimization - capacity monitoring 3. Payments and Pricing - fraud detection, theft prevention Blockchain Use Cases:
  46. 46. Have Immutable Records for Data
  47. 47. Institutions can Issue Verified (Digital) Credentials to Organizations
  48. 48. Verifiable Organizations Network British Columbia Government is building it, and its all up on GitHub
  49. 49. Verifiable Organizations Network
  50. 50. Verifiable Organizations Network
  51. 51. Verifiable Organizations Network OrgBookProfile a Business Public Business Permits
  52. 52. Verifiable Organizations Network OrgBookProfile a Business Business Owner Can Claim These Public Business Permits
  53. 53. Verifiable Organizations Network OrgBookProfile a Business Business Owner Can Claim These In the Verifiable Credentials Format Public Business Permits
  54. 54. Verifiable Organizations Network OrgBookProfile a Business Business Owner Can Claim These In the Verifiable Credentials Format In a Digital Wallet Public Business Permits
  55. 55. Verifiable Organizations Network HolderIssuer Verifier Issues 
 Claim Decentralized Identifiers (DIDs) Public Blockchain or other Decentralized Network Signs Claim Countersigns Claim Wallet Slide credit: Drummond Reed, Sovrin Foundation BC GOVERNMENT BC BUSINESS
  56. 56. Verifiable Organizations Network HolderIssuer Verifier Issues 
 Claim Decentralized Identifiers (DIDs) Public Blockchain or other Decentralized Network Signs Claim Countersigns Claim Verifies Signatures Wallet Slide credit: Drummond Reed, Sovrin Foundation BC GOVERNMENT BC BUSINESS CANADIAN GOVERNMENT
  57. 57. Verifiable Organizations Network HolderIssuer Verifier Issues 
 Claim Presents
 Claim Decentralized Identifiers (DIDs) Public Blockchain or other Decentralized Network Signs Claim Countersigns Claim Verifies Signatures Wallet Slide credit: Drummond Reed, Sovrin Foundation BC GOVERNMENT BC BUSINESS CANADIAN GOVERNMENT
  58. 58. Create Addressable Identifiers Created and Owned by People
  59. 59. Self Sovereign Identity no facebook no phone number no email provider
  60. 60. Decentralized IDentifier - DID did:sov:3k9dg356wdcj5gf2k9bw8kfg7a Method Scheme Method-Specific Identifier Slide credit: Drummond Reed, Sovrin Foundation
  61. 61. did:sov:3k9dg356wdcj5gf2k9bw8kfg7a Slide credit: Drummond Reed, Sovrin Foundation
  62. 62. did:sov:3k9dg356wdcj5gf2k9bw8kfg7a Public Key cc2cd0ffde594d278c2d9b432f4748506a7f9f2 5141e485eb84bc188382019b6 Slide credit: Drummond Reed, Sovrin Foundation
  63. 63. did:sov:3k9dg356wdcj5gf2k9bw8kfg7a 047d599d4521480d9e1919481b024f29d2693f2 72d19473dbef971d7d529f6e9 Private
 Key Public Key cc2cd0ffde594d278c2d9b432f4748506a7f9f2 5141e485eb84bc188382019b6 Slide credit: Drummond Reed, Sovrin Foundation
  64. 64. did:sov:3k9dg356wdcj5gf2k9bw8kfg7a 047d599d4521480d9e1919481b024f29d2693f2 72d19473dbef971d7d529f6e9 Private
 Key Public Key cc2cd0ffde594d278c2d9b432f4748506a7f9f2 5141e485eb84bc188382019b6 Slide credit: Drummond Reed, Sovrin Foundation
  65. 65. { “Key”: “Value” } DID Decentralized Identifier DID Document JSON-LD document describing the entity identified by the DID Slide credit: Drummond Reed, Sovrin Foundation
  66. 66. 1. DID (for self-description) 2. Set of public keys (for verification) 3. Set of auth protocols (for authentication) 4. Set of service endpoints (for interaction) 5. Timestamp (for audit history) 6. Signature (for integrity) 89 The standard elements of a DID doc Slide credit: Drummond Reed, Sovrin Foundation
  67. 67. 1. DID (for self-description) 2. Set of public keys (for verification) 3. Set of auth protocols (for authentication) 4. Set of service endpoints (for interaction) 5. Timestamp (for audit history) 6. Signature (for integrity) 90 The standard elements of a DID doc Slide credit: Drummond Reed, Sovrin Foundation
  68. 68. 1. DID (for self-description) 2. Set of public keys (for verification) 3. Set of auth protocols (for authentication) 4. Set of service endpoints (for interaction) 5. Timestamp (for audit history) 6. Signature (for integrity) 91 The standard elements of a DID doc Slide credit: Drummond Reed, Sovrin Foundation
  69. 69. 1. DID (for self-description) 2. Set of public keys (for verification) 3. Set of auth protocols (for authentication) 4. Set of service endpoints (for interaction) 5. Timestamp (for audit history) 6. Signature (for integrity) 92 The standard elements of a DID doc Slide credit: Drummond Reed, Sovrin Foundation
  70. 70. 1. DID (for self-description) 2. Set of public keys (for verification) 3. Set of auth protocols (for authentication) 4. Set of service endpoints (for interaction) 5. Timestamp (for audit history) 6. Signature (for integrity) 93 The standard elements of a DID doc Slide credit: Drummond Reed, Sovrin Foundation
  71. 71. NO PERSONALLY IDENTIFIABLE INFORMATION ENDS UP ON THE BLOCK CHAIN
  72. 72. Shared Ledgers
  73. 73. DID Layer The decentralized identity “stack” Cloud Layer Cloud Wallet Cloud Wallet Cloud Agent Cloud Agent Identity Owners Edge Layer Edge Wallet Edge Wallet Edge Agent Edge Agent Slide credit: Drummond Reed, Sovrin Foundation Identity Owners
  74. 74. My Credit Union ID
  75. 75. HolderIssuer Verifier Issues 
 Claim Decentralized Identifiers (DIDs) Public Blockchain or other Decentralized Network Signs Claim Countersigns Claim Wallet Slide credit: Drummond Reed, Sovrin Foundation CREDIT UNION CU MEMBER
  76. 76. HolderIssuer Verifier Issues 
 Claim Decentralized Identifiers (DIDs) Public Blockchain or other Decentralized Network Signs Claim Countersigns Claim Verifies Signatures Wallet Slide credit: Drummond Reed, Sovrin Foundation CREDIT UNION CU MEMBER 2nd CREDIT UNION
  77. 77. HolderIssuer Verifier Issues 
 Claim Presents
 Claim Decentralized Identifiers (DIDs) Public Blockchain or other Decentralized Network Signs Claim Countersigns Claim Verifies Signatures Wallet Slide credit: Drummond Reed, Sovrin Foundation CREDIT UNION CU MEMBER 2nd CREDIT UNION
  78. 78. 101
  79. 79. Coordinate Activity Across Many Organizations
  80. 80. The Amply project, supported by UNICEF and Innovation Edge, built a mobile app using the ixo protocol to track attendance in pre-schools in South Africa. Combining mobile and blockchain technology to increase impact and accountability of public services and generate real-time data.
  81. 81. HIE OF ONE HEALTH INFORMATION EXCHANGE
  82. 82. BlockChain and Land Rights? Blockchain and Property in 2018: 
 At the End of the Beginning
  83. 83. Intro: Why Blockchain Makes Sense for Real Estate • The technology is decentralized, fault-tolerant, and tamper-resistant; offering security and resiliency. • Blockchain is disruptive for land governance, it may promote property rights formalization, registry modernization, and the collection/analysis of data. • Blockchain can generate increased efficiency and lower transaction costs in the global real estate sector. • The technology allows for improved liquidity of property, financial inclusion, and increased foreign investment.
  84. 84. Paper Overview 1. FPR’s seven prerequisites for blockchain introduction into a land registry. 2. Conceptual framework: Eight levels of integration from the simple to more radical. 3. Five topics on the future interaction of blockchain and land, from title insurance to regulation. 4. Six case studies of companies active in the space.
  85. 85. Different Blockchain Flavors Bitcoin,
 Ethereum, IOTA,
 Veres One Permissionless Permissioned Public Private Validation Access Hyperledger Sawtooth* Sovrin, IPDB Hyperledger (Fabric, Sawtooth, Iroha),
 R3 Corda,
 CU Ledger* in permissionless mode Slide credit: Drummond Reed, Sovrin Foundation
  86. 86. Should I use a Blockchain?
  87. 87. Does my use case involved a database? Will there be numerous users updating my database? Do these users need to trust each other? Are there problems caused by the use of central/third party entity? Do transactions depend on/interact with each other? I should be using a blockchain!
  88. 88. Kaliya Young kaliya@IdentityWoman.net Get the Self-Sovereign Identity Scoop SSIScoop.com HumanFirst.Tech

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