Organizing principles of design ART 100

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Organizing principles of design ART 100

  1. 1. ORGANIZING PRINCIPLES OF DESIGN  Repetition  Variety  Rhythm  Balance  Compositional Unity  Economy  Proportion  Relationship to the Environment
  2. 2. Organizing Principles of Design  Artists use principles of design to combine the visual elements of art into compositions that have a certain style, form, and content.  Design (or composition) is a process —the act of organizing the visual elements to effect a desired aesthetic in a work of art.
  3. 3. Repetition
  4. 4. Georgia O’Keefe
  5. 5. Andy Warhol
  6. 6. © Magdalena Abakanowicz, courtesy, Marlborough Gallery, New York/ Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY.
  7. 7. Lee Krasner
  8. 8. Faith Ringold
  9. 9. Variety Louise Nevelson Variety is difference, which provides interest.
  10. 10. Alice Neel
  11. 11. Rhythm  The regular repetition of sensory impressions result in rhythms.  Artists can enhance or exaggerate individual elements in their composition through minor and major variations in rhythm.
  12. 12. Edward Hopper
  13. 13. Piet Mondrian
  14. 14. Lee Krasner
  15. 15. Louise Bourgeois
  16. 16. Joan Mitchell
  17. 17. Balance  In art, balance refers to the actual or apparent weight of the elements of a composition.
  18. 18. Balance  Actual Balance and Pictorial Balance Because sculptures have actual weight, they also have actual balance. Pictorial balance refers to the distribution of the apparent or visual weight of the elements in works that are basically two dimensional.
  19. 19. BALANCE VISUAL WEIGHT
  20. 20. Balance  Symmetrical balance (also known as pure or formal balance) occurs when everything in a composition to either side of an actual or imaginary line is identical.
  21. 21. Balance  Symmetrical balance in art can be created through approximate symmetry, in which the whole of the work has a symmetrical feeling, but slight variations provide more visual interest than would a mirror image.
  22. 22. Approximate SYMMETRICAL BALANCE Georgia O’Keefe
  23. 23. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Gift of Lalia and Thurston Twigg-Smith. Copyright Whitney Museum, New York/Electronic Arts Intermiix (EAI), New York. Nam June Paik
  24. 24. Edward Weston Shaka Triad, Japan 623
  25. 25. Paul Gauguin
  26. 26. Frida Khalo
  27. 27. © Kenneth Garett/Woodfin Camp Associates U. S. Capital
  28. 28. Balance  Asymmetrical balance occurs when the variations to one side of the composition are more than slight, yet an overall sense of balance remains.
  29. 29. National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., Chester Dale Collection © 2003 Estate of Pablo Picasso/ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York ASYMMETRICAL BALANCE Pablo Picasso
  30. 30. Alice Neel
  31. 31. Cindy Sherman
  32. 32. Gustav Klimt
  33. 33. Mary Cassatt
  34. 34. WhitneyMuseumofAmericanArt,NewYork;GiftofHowardandJeanLipmanFoundation. ©2003ArtistsRightsSociety(ARS),NewYork/ADAGP,Paris Nikki De Saint Phalle
  35. 35. Fede Galizia
  36. 36. Radial Balance In works of art with radial balance, the design elements radiate from a center point.
  37. 37. American Museum of Natural History, NY.
  38. 38. Compositional Unity
  39. 39. Paul Cezanne
  40. 40. Mary Cassatt
  41. 41. HOLDING SOME VISUAL ELEMENTS CONSTANT, VARYING OTHERS, creates unity Henri Matisse
  42. 42. Jackson Pollock
  43. 43. Lee Krasner
  44. 44. Eyelines
  45. 45. UNITY AND VARIETY Ben Jones
  46. 46. Andy Warhol
  47. 47. © Magdalena Abakanowicz, courtesy, Marlborough Gallery, New York/ Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY.
  48. 48. Emphasis and Subordination Henry Ossawa Tanner
  49. 49. Emphasis and Focal Point  Artists use the design principle of emphasis to focus the viewer’s attention on one or more parts of a composition by accentuating certain shapes intensifying value or color featuring directional lines strategically placing the objects and images.
  50. 50. Emphasis and Focal Point  Emphasis can be used to create focal points or specific parts of the work that seize and hold the viewer's interest.
  51. 51. Lavina Fontana
  52. 52. Eva Hesse, 1964
  53. 53. Francisco de Goya
  54. 54. Paul Cezanne
  55. 55. Mary Cassatt
  56. 56. Courtesy of The Royal Photographic Society/Heritage Image Partnership
  57. 57. Economy
  58. 58. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Acquired through an anonymous fund, the Mr. And Mrs. Joseph Slifka and Armand G. Erpf Funds, andby gift of the artist. Copyright 2003 Successio Miró/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris /Art Resource, New York. Juan Miro
  59. 59. Sakai Hoitsu
  60. 60. Nonomura Sotatsu. The Zen Priest Choka, early Edo Period late 16th c
  61. 61. SCALE AND PROPORTION  Scale means size in relation to a standard or “normal” size.  Proportion refers to size relationship between parts of a whole, or between two or more items perceived as a unit.
  62. 62. Scale  Distortion of scale occurs when artists want to distort or subvert the realistic scale of objects to challenge the viewer to look at the familiar in a new way.
  63. 63. Copyright 2003, C. Herscovici, Brussels /Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Art Resources, New York. Rene Magritte
  64. 64. Liz Larner
  65. 65. Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen
  66. 66. Louise Bourgeios
  67. 67. HIERARCHICAL SCALE
  68. 68. El Greco
  69. 69. PORPORTION REFERS TO SIZE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN PARTS OF A WHOLE.
  70. 70. Rene Magritte
  71. 71. Proportion  The Canon of Proportions:  “Keeping Things in Proportion” A set of rules about body parts and their dimensions relative to one another that became the standard for creating the ideal figure.
  72. 72. Proportion  Proportion is the comparative relationship (or ratio) of things to one another.
  73. 73. Out of proportion, shifts in scale Louise Bourgeois
  74. 74. Matt Wedel
  75. 75. Yinzhaoyang Big Respect
  76. 76. Jim Keville
  77. 77. Jim Keville

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