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Cambridge Social Innovation Presentation social innovation meetup [autosaved]

+Acumen is the largest social sector online learning platform in the world. The Cambridge Social Innovation Hub was founded to create space for social entrepreneurs to learn skills that help serve themselves and people better. This presentation was given to another meetup group in Cambridge, CamCreatives, to showcase the last course we ran - "Human Centred Design for Social Innovation" - a creative and collaborative problem solving technique that promotes divergent and convergent thinking, contribution from interdisciplinary skilled people (complete strangers) and a chosen design challenge where a product or service is always developed on the back of the course. It's all about mindsets and moving from a fixed mindset to a growth mindset, empowering people. Anyone can be a change maker and anyone can be a social entrepreneur. An entrepreneur is someone that creates opportunities from resources that are already available. A social entrepreneur is one that additionally aims and delivers social impact.

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Cambridge Social Innovation Presentation social innovation meetup [autosaved]

  1. 1. http://www.meetup.com/Cambridge-Social-Innovation-Meetup/ Hi. My name is Jeanette Sjoberg Inspirer, Change maker, Enabler, parent, partner, friend…. Founder of the Cambridge Social Innovation Meetup chapter
  2. 2. http://www.meetup.com/Cambridge-Social-Innovation-Meetup/ Presentation to the CamCreatives Meetup Date: Wednesday,27th April 2016 @7.30pm Location: Hot Numbers Unit 6 Dale's Brewery, Gwydir Street, Cambridge Objectives: q Tell you why we set up the Cambridge Social Innovation Chapter q What our aims and objectives are q What we do in the meetup & member feedback q Insight into what we have created together since the meetup has started q How you can take part/ signup/ what’s next
  3. 3. The Hero’s Journey
  4. 4. How can we make sense in the world so we can act in it? Copyright Photo: Dave Snowden Dave Snowden is an academic, consultant and researcher, currently focused on complexity theory in human sensemaking
  5. 5. Personal dilemma in 2012!! What does it mean to be “customer centric”? Source: http://www.stamfordadvisory.com/?p=542
  6. 6. What does “being human centred” mean?
  7. 7. AND BELIEVING YOU HAVE THE CAPACITYTO CHANGE YOURSELF & YOUR MINDSET.
  8. 8. How can I be more “creative”? How can I learn to be more “human centred”?
  9. 9. https://novoed.com/hcd-acumen
  10. 10. Mindsets, skills & methodologies Source: IDEO
  11. 11. In 2013, found some friends in the village….. And a helper...
  12. 12. q Empathy skills q Active listening skills & critical thinking skills q Collaboration q Importance of communities q Toolkits to imagine, create & innovate new ways to solve problems & create opportunities q It’s interdisciplinary q Design thinking offers a toolbox of mindsets, skills and methodologies that can be adopted, adapted and incorporated depending on your needs What I learnt
  13. 13. 2016…........ What is stopping us changing the world? Where can we find like-minded communities? If we can make sense in the world then we can ACT
  14. 14. We decided to create a Cambridge Chapter a “salon” to create space for conversation & connection
  15. 15. Cambridge needs “Salons” q To create a SALON for inspiring conversation for its own sake q Share ideas and skills and how we might change social reality – history has proven it takes only a handful of creative and concerned individuals to trigger large scale positive change q To be a cultural revolution: the revolution of rebuilding and revitalising communities q Reviving the ability to talk with others and relate with each other for the simple pleasure of doing so, and, for the pleasure of contributing to human progress q Having conversations without measuring whether it will be worthwhile q To be connected to a living community where relationships and ideas can be enjoyed.
  16. 16. Our goals Winning back our ability to talk with one another (as opposed to talking 'at' one another) is the ultimate and most precious goal of our chapter. Being empowered! No judgement! To create an environment for conversation where skills & learning are shared and great ideas are born...and where people find the energy to have a positive influence on the world & become adaptable and evolving individuals, even in uncertainty.
  17. 17. http://www.meetup.com/Cambridge-Social-Innovation-Meetup/
  18. 18. Our aim and why we are about “Social Innovation”
  19. 19. How the chapter works q We are self-empowered, individuals +100 change makers & growing q It’s run on a volunteer basis – relies on a community to make it work q We are currently using the FREE +Acumen courses, provided by Acumen.org, as the basis for conversation, sharing & learning.
  20. 20. A BOLD NEW WAYOF TACKLING POVERTY THAT’SABOUT DIGNITY,NOT DEPENDENCE, AND CHOICE, NOT CHARITY. http://acumen.org Who is Acumen?
  21. 21. Human-centered design is a process that begins with gaining deep empathy for an individual’s needs, hopes and aspirations for the future. +Acumen is a new initiative started in 2012 with the vision of providing thousands of emerging leaders around the world with the skills and moral imagination they need to become more effective at changing the way the world tackles poverty. http://plusacumen.org
  22. 22. The Human-Centered Design course is a seven-week curriculum. It introduces human-centered design concepts and how this approach can be used to create innovative, effective, and sustainable solutions for social change. No experience necessary to be human centered or creative! http://plusacumen.org/courses/hcd-for-social-innovation/ Design Kit: The Human-Centered Design course JOIN US AT THE BOX CAFÉ FROM THURSDAY, 5TH MAY @ 8PM.
  23. 23. For the past 2 years, Acumen has been applying lean experimentation principles to the collection and use of social impact data. We call this new approach ‘Lean Data.” It uses new technologies to gain information about customers more quickly and efficiently, yielding powerful business insights and ideas about how we can make products, services and programs more meaningful for customers. In this 3-module course, you’ll get started on building a lean data approach for your own social enterprise or organization This Lean Data initiative recently landed Acumen on Fast Company’s list of the Top 10 Most Innovative Non-Profits JOIN US AT THE BOX CAFÉ FROM THURSDAY, 12TH MAY @ 8PM.
  24. 24. How does learning work?
  25. 25. What we need qMore permanent venue qSponsorship! q Please contact us if you can help
  26. 26. What attracted people to the courses? What outcomes did each of our change makers hope for?
  27. 27. Digital Product Development and Implementation consultant “I was attracted to the course because I was looking to create more effective solutions in my working life managing product development projects - look at tangible methods to ensuring the clients I worked with kept user-need at the centre of their choices and decisions on solutions, priorities and direction. In the first class, we had to set out what we wanted to achieve - my expectations were very much about process and method - very tangible outcomes. This perspective was of course completely turned on it's head during the course where I saw the benefits of a freedom in thought and process around an empowered and enabled group with a shared purpose.” Sarah Hide
  28. 28. Research Scientist in Biology “To those much is given, much is expected. It is just a question and it’s up to us how we answer this” . Being inquisitive about humans, I try to look into humans and their behavior through various angles. I am trying to connect dots between society and humans . I came to the course to understand human centered problems with the eyes of the people who are facing them. Ankita Singhal
  29. 29. Psychologist, specialising in human resources & tools & conflict management "I was really curious about the human-centered design approach and I found the opportunity to join the best team to learn it. The course was very stimulating, with space to think, to inspire, to collaborate, to share, to act,…I have learned how to develop a human-centered design project with a wide toolkit, methodologies, and experiences." Núria Rovira-Asenjo
  30. 30. Aerospace engineer When I joined this course I knew very little about the Human-Centered Design concept. At first glance, the content of the course seemed to me very appealing and promising and out of curiosity, I thought it could be a nice way to learn new skills and interact with interesting people and this has been the main reason I joined the course. Salvatore Cito
  31. 31. Computer engineer "I was looking for creative interests and opportunities for myself outside my day job, and wished to hone my creative thinking. The course was a good platform to learn how to design for social impact, and to apply the learnings in real time. It brought various types of motivations, ideas and expertise together, to keep us interested and working, and make us able to actually design something" Moksh Upadhyay
  32. 32. Emerging Technology Consultant & Product Development I have a background in working with new technologies and applying them to business. Typically this involves approaching from two directions; firstly understanding business challenges and secondly understanding what is technically possible. Putting the two together is challenging and typically requires a lot of creativity and lateral thinking as well as understanding people aspects of implementing change. I've recently been doing some voluntary work with a couple of Cambridge based charities and the Human Centred Design course caught my eye because the approach is about taking an everyday problem and finding a way to resolve it. The challenges the charities face are more fundamental than the ones I face in my work and so I thought that this course would be helpful. Chris Bullen
  33. 33. Philosophy of human centred design is what is important • Trust each other • Forming teams to solve problems is interdisciplinary - less around specific skills…. ….....it’s more about mind-sets We actively reserve judgement - there are no bad ideas, just poor execution Give up control of the outcome? Fluid, edge of chaos brings out some of the best “just-in-time” ideas Doing the course…… 1. Be a fluid group - not all people made it each week 2. Don’t be overwhelmed by the number of hours - put in as much as you can – there is no judgment – we care about your insights not if you have done “your homework” “you learn when you share” “you teach what you need to learn the most” self empowering group
  34. 34. VENUE www.theboxcafe.co.uk 47 Norfolk Street Cambridge CB1 2LD Next course dates W TM T FS S 5 6 7 13 14 1 2 3 4 8 9 10 11 20 2115 16 17 18 Design Kit: The Human-Centered Design course (7 weeks) 12 19 Start date at the Box Café: MAY Lean data approaches to measure social impact (at least 3 weeks) 26 27 2822 23 24 25 http://plusacumen.org/courses/lean-data/ http://plusacumen.org/courses/ MAKE SURE YOU REGISTER ON THE +ACUMEN SITE http://www.meetup.com/Cambridge-Social-Innovation-Meetup/
  35. 35. What to expect on the course 1. Weekly readings to familiarise yourself with the learning topic – 7 meet ups for this course 2. Workshop guide – bring your own copy…
  36. 36. Class 1 – Overview of all the stages of the course & what to expect
  37. 37. Class 1 – the challenge Design challenge: How might we improve our journey to work? What we did in our meetup?
  38. 38. Ankita’s journey to work was only 10 minutes – on the surface, it looked like there was no way for us to improve her journey When the group reflected together, we realised that some of the pains she highlighted gave us insights into the competing systems and tensions between buses, cyclists, cars, pedestrians & parked cars. Was it fit for purpose?
  39. 39. Class 2 – Inspiration Phase Create meaningful solutions beginning with gaining a deep understanding of people’s needs 1. Choose a design challenge 2. Plan research methods 3. Build your interview guide 4. Additional research methods 5. Capture learnings GET OUT THERE!
  40. 40. Organised ourselves into teams
  41. 41. Choosing a design challenge
  42. 42. A. Plan research methods As part of the discovery/inspiration phase, learn different types of research methods & go out in the field to try them out.
  43. 43. Pupil choices based on perception Surveyed what pupils “liked”, what they thought was ”healthy” and “unhealthy” and what made them decide this? LANCASHIRE HOT POT WAS DEEMED UNHEALTHY BECAUSE IT DID NOT “LOOK” HEALTHY…A KEY “AHA” MOMENT. How might we make healthy food, “LOOK” healthy?
  44. 44. B. Plan research methods An interview with a local secondary school revealed that, again, the infrastructure was designed a long time ago. Small dining facilities & lunch clubs forced the need for convenience food to turnover nearly a 1000 children in a very short space of time. Wrapping food regulations caused lots of rubbish - a side effect The head was open to talking about “how might we…” Recognised that imposed government/regulatory standards did not consider school’s constraints. Other schools shut the door – not interested & defensive. We concluded that it was pointless changing the existing system – “create a new one” – lots of ideas from this observation.
  45. 45. Online research Overload of standards - what is practical on the ground?
  46. 46. C. Plan research methods We did immersions with young children to understand their attitudes to certain foods and asked the questions – what did they know about fibre, sugar, salt, fat content etc in food. We got them to scan cereal boxes to find out how much sugar was in a single “helping”. We also asked them about redefining breakfast – eating what your body needs not what the media tells you to eat for breakfast!
  47. 47. D. Plan research methods ”Fruit and vegetables could resemble body organs, each with a significant role to play as part of a co-dependent community. If a body organ become ill, then the community might be affected” Considering ways in which we could link what we eat to organs in the body and how we might curate the food to keep our ecosystem healthy.
  48. 48. Prepare interview questions Ask parents what their children eat at school Often parents did not check or know. Ask teachers what sorts of foods they observed pupils eating? Limited access to teachers – considered “confidential” Asked pupils what lunches other pupils ate? Coffee only for breakfast was frequent amongst 14 year old boys, 3 cup cakes for lunch each day for a 12 year old girl, white bread with ham everyday for a 14 year old girl, Leicester cheese sandwich everyday for another, hot biscuits made by the school for break time – best seller – every day. Reflection: children prefer highly stimulating food, did not consider what the food contained and often surprised at the amount of sugar when actually physically shown the amount of sugar. “Might” make different food choices when asked if they were more informed..
  49. 49. Class 3 – Ideation Phase Transform your research into meaningful & actionable insights that will become the foundation of your design
  50. 50. More story sharing, themes, gems & headlines
  51. 51. How might we inform parents & primary children to make healthier food choices? Refined our design challenge
  52. 52. Insights & ”how might we…” 1. Biases – people’s food choices are impacted by the way food looks. The appearance can lead a person to think it looks unhealthy & unappealing. 2. Positive behaviours have been reinforcedthrough goals in wanting a healthy lifestyle – Finland teenagers have been routinely setting personal goals around healthy eating, exercise, healthy living (FINEDU project). Role models can be a way forward. 3. The System – is not worth trying to influence. Schools don’t decide much – subject to regulation. Schools resistance in getting involved. It appears to be broken. Create a new system. 4. Priorities – it was more important for a child to forego a healthy meal than miss a piano lesson. Mostly snacks on the go/convenience food.
  53. 53. RAPID PROTOTYPING
  54. 54. http://www.visit.limited/HCD/ Prototype 1 Chris created a quick app which helped us expand our thinking on how we wanted to solve the design challenge. We sent it round to loads of parents to get feedback
  55. 55. Prototype 2 We started to overcomplicate what the online app game might look like. Aha moment when we realised we want to have a game that encouraged conversation about the basics of what food contains. Salvatore suggested a game similar to Timeline
  56. 56. Prototype 3 Interacting with our simple prototype - how the game(s) would work
  57. 57. Playing and Learning • Play and learn with family & friends at school and at home • Play at different levels of complexity as learning progresses or different age ranges play • Incorporate add-ons that can be bought separately to augment game play and thus learning • Non-digital, cheap and easy to carry and store
  58. 58. Food Fun Card Game • Selection of 115 cards to play • All different foods within each food group • A picture of the food plus nutrient scores – Carbohydrate/Sugars/Protein/Fats/Fibre/Vitamins • Game play cards to choose the game goal and rules e.g. select and replace cards to get “full house” or highest score for fibre in foods. • Aim is to encourage conversation and understanding of food nutrients to develop a baseline understanding of food
  59. 59. Game Play
  60. 60. Game 1 The aim of the game is simple. Correctly work out each of your cards should go on the food line and you will win. . Rules: • Each player is dealt a starting hand of cards. The front displayed to the player has a picture of food. On the reverse are details about its food groups (which you cannot look at). • One card is put in the centre of the table with food groups displayed and selects a food group e.g. fat, value = 3.5g • The player to the left of the dealer then selects a card from their cards and puts it in front or behind. The player then reveals the card’s food group and it must have a higher or lower value than the food group already on the table. The player then flips over the card. If they are correct, it is the next player’s turn. If they are not correct, then the card is discarded and the player picks up another card from the pack. • The first player to lose their cards wins the game. ”Timeline” style game
  61. 61. Carbohydrate Sugar Protein Fat Fibre Total Energy Vitamins 33g 3.6g 11g 10g 2.3g 266 KJ 60 Kcal Per 100g (1 slice) Dealer deals a selected number of cards to each player and puts a card on the table, revealing its nutrients and selects the “fat” category = 10g Picture is on the back of the card
  62. 62. Player 2 must select a card (broccoli) from his/her own pack of cards and determine if the fat content is higher or lower than the card on the table
  63. 63. Player 2 places card to the left of the pizza slice which is correct – broccoli has a lower fat content. Family & friends can have positive discussions with
  64. 64. The next player must select a card (avocado) from his/her own pack of cards and determine if the fat content is higher or lower than the cards on the table
  65. 65. Avocado is higher in GOOD fat! What makes this ok?
  66. 66. Game 2 The aim of the game is to familiarise players about food groups. Minimum 2 players. Rules: • To start, shuffle and deal all the cards. Each player holds their cards so they can only see the top card. • Player to the dealer’s left starts by reading the category from the top card e.g. fat, value 1.5g. The other players read out the same category from their cards. The one with the best wins, and that player collects all the top cards, including their own, and moves them to the bottom of the pile. It is then their turn to choose a category from the next card. • If two or more cards have the top value, then all the cards go in the middle and the same player chooses a category from the next card. The winner of the hand takes all the cards in the middle as well. • The person with all the cards at the end is the winner. ”Top Trumps” style game
  67. 67. All cards are dealt – player 1 has Broccoli and knows that it is the top card in the pack for fibre. Player 2 fibre score is lower so player 1 wins both cards
  68. 68. • Are you able to look at the world from someone else’s eyes and put yourself in their shoes? • Are you able to understand the needs, the problems, the issues, the desires, their jobs to get done? • AND SO, can you provide a solution? • Community is a community of change makers who are the heart AND soul of the change, starting initiatives to support social and business innovation • Build skills & capacity to care for each other (Ashoka ‘Start Empathy Initiative’) will change our world. These skills cannot just be learnt – they must be practised and applied Always start from the customer view
  69. 69. VENUE www.theboxcafe.co.uk 47 Norfolk Street Cambridge CB1 2LD Next course dates W TM T FS S 5 6 7 13 14 1 2 3 4 8 9 10 11 20 2115 16 17 18 Design Kit: The Human-Centered Design course (7 weeks) 12 19 Start date at the Box Café: MAY Lean data approaches to measure social impact (at least 3 weeks) 26 27 2822 23 24 25 http://plusacumen.org/courses/lean-data/ http://plusacumen.org/courses/ MAKE SURE YOU REGISTER ON THE +ACUMEN SITE http://www.meetup.com/Cambridge-Social-Innovation-Meetup/
  70. 70. Connect with our groups: Meetup to learn new skills, be more creative, human-centered, make space for conversations: http://www.meetup.com/Cambridge-Social-Innovation-Meetup/ Facebook Groups: Human Centered topics - https://www.facebook.com/HumanCenteredDesignThinking/ Cynefin discussing complexity, human sensemaking, making sense in the world so we can act in it – https://www.facebook.com/CynefinCommunity/ Connect with me directly: Jeanette.sjoberg@gmail.com https://uk.linkedin.com/in/jeanettesjoberg And my current social venture creating a platform to enable individuals to be more visible http://www.switchedonpeople.co.uk
  71. 71. Hi. My name is Jeanette Sjoberg Inspirer | Change maker | Enabler | parent | partner | friend…. Current “social” projects: q What does it mean to be “human centred”? q How might we empower individuals to be more visible to each other and to organisationsto enable purpose and impact? q How might we educate parents and their primary school children about healthy food and making more informed choices? q The future of work is social collaboration. How might organisations and individuals be more responsive to change and uncertainty?
  72. 72. Hi. My name is Chris Bullen Current “social” projects: q Creating a “Virtual Academy” to bring together the work of museums, galleries and training organisations in an online 3D space. q Working with Realife Trust, Best Buddies UK and the KyangalaTrust to find ways to how help the disadvantaged and those disconnected from society.

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