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Miami and Commercial Drones

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Summary of the emerging drone economy and how Miami-Dade County could benefit from the growing sector of unmanned aviation.

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Miami and Commercial Drones

  1. 1. Miami and Commercial Drones June 15, 2017 1
  2. 2. PRESENTER: CHRISTOPHER TODD 2 1.Former technology analyst, advised Fortune 500 firms on various Internet content and marketing strategies. 2.Former U.S. Coast Guard search and rescue operator. 3.Founder/president of Airborne Response. Miami Beach-based drone services company focused on commercial services and emergency response. 4.Founder of the Airborne Incident Response Team (AIRT), a global network of drone operators who can assist in emergencies and disasters.
  3. 3. OBJECTIVES 3 1. Assess the market & opportunity for commercial drones in Miami 2. Explore emerging drone use cases 3. Understand current FAA Part 107 UAS regulations 4. Q&A
  4. 4. DRONE, UAS & UAV 4 drone /drōn/: a remote-controlled pilotless aircraft or missile Official FAA designation is unmanned aircraft system (UAS), also commonly called unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). A UAS is defined by statue as an aircraft that is operated without the possibility of direct human intervention from within or on the aircraft.
  5. 5. 2017 DRONE PRODUCTION = 3 MILLION 5 Production Increase of 39% from 2016 2016 2017 Personal Drones 2,041.9 2,817.3 Commercial Drones 110.3 174.1 Total Units 2,152.2 2,991.4 Total Growth 60.3% 39.0% Personal and Commercial Drone Units Forecast, 2016-17 (Thousands of Units) SOURCE: Gartner (February 2017)
  6. 6. 2020 DRONE PRODUCTION = 7.8 MILLION 6 Over $3.3 billion in revenue from consumer drones SOURCE: Goldman Sachs Research (May 2017)
  7. 7. 2017 TOTAL U.S. AVIATION FLEET SIZE 7 0 200000 400000 600000 800000 1000000 1200000 Manned Unmanned Manned UAS Manned Commercial Aviation = 7,500 (approx) Manned General Aviation = 205,000 (approx) Unmanned Aviation = 2,545,000 (approx) SOURCE: FAA Aerospace Forecast (Fiscal Years 2017-2037) 212,500 2,545,000
  8. 8. FAA UAS FORECASTS 8 Potential for Over 6 Million UAS in NAS by 2021 Year Commercial Hobbyist 2016 0.042 1.100 2017 0.235 2.310 2018 0.445 3.180 2019 0.742 3.790 2020 1.133 4.150 2021 1.616 4.470 Total U.S. UAS Fleet, High-End Projections (Millions of Units) SOURCE: FAA Aerospace Forecast (Fiscal Years 2017-2037)
  9. 9. WHO IS OPERATING THE DRONES? 9 Military Public Agencies Commercial Operators “Hobbyists”
  10. 10. COMMERCIAL VS HOBBYIST OPERATORS 10 COMMERCIAL OPERATORS • Certified as a Remote Pilot by FAA Part 107 or Section 333 • Aircraft(s) must be FAA registered • Fly for commerce/business • Training, insurance, safety-focused • Building a reputation/business HOBBYIST OPERATORS • No FAA certification required • Aircraft could be FAA registered • Fly for fun • May or may not have training, experience, insurance • Flight operations not commerce or business related.
  11. 11. FLORIDA RANKS #2 IN REMOTE PILOTS 11 SOURCE: FAA via sUAS News, April 6, 2017
  12. 12. FAA REMOTE PILOT ESTIMATED GROWTH 12 UAS SOURCE: FAA Aerospace Forecast (Fiscal Years 2017-2037) 20,362 422,000 0 50000 100000 150000 200000 250000 300000 350000 400000 450000 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 RP's 327,000 241,800 166,800 107,800
  13. 13. WHAT ARE DRONES DOING TODAY? 13 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 Aerial Photography Real Estate Construction Agriculture Emergency Mgmt. Insurance SOURCE: FAA Aerospace Forecast (Fiscal Years 2017-2037) Insurance 34%Aerial Photography Real Estate Construction / Industrial Agriculture Emergency 26% 26% 21% 8% 5%
  14. 14. OK, this is all great stuff, but what does it really mean? 14
  15. 15. DRONE + DATA = BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE 15 1. A drone by itself is essentially useless for business purposes. 2. When combined with a payload, the drone becomes a tool. 3. The tool can capture data or deliver cargo. 4. Software processes the data and delivers actionable intelligence. 5. Artificial Intelligence (AI) will redefine how drones operate.
  16. 16. USE CASE EXAMPLES 16 Accident Investigation Bridge Inspection Cell Tower Inspection Construction Surveys Crime Scene Investigation Crop Analysis Disaster Response Brush Fire Prevention Harbor/Marine Patrol Insurance Claims Land Surveys Mapping News Gathering Pipeline Inspection Port Security Power Line Inspection Private Security Public Safety Real Estate Imagery Wildlife Surveys
  17. 17. AT&T UAS PROGRAM 17 • 33% of manned cell tower climbs eliminated via drones • Microwave path analysis • Bird nest surveys • Working on tethered drone systems to conduct maintenance and repairs • CoW UAS to provide mobile network services at special events and during disaster response
  18. 18. BECHTEL - CONSTRUCTION 18 • Site mapping and planning • Inventory management • Surveying and design • Volumetric calculations • Environmental compliance • Insurance claims management • Parking and traffic management
  19. 19. FLORIDA AVOCADO GROWERS 19 • Ambrosia beetle infests avocado tree with a dense canopy resulting in Laurel Wilt disease, ultimately threatening grove • FIU creates “Dogs and Drones” research program, drones evaluate tree canopy • Grove owners now flying drones to inspect their own tree canopies for Laurel Wilt • Multi-spectral and hyper-spectral imaging solutions may be the key, but very costly
  20. 20. FIRE RESCUE 20 • Menlo Park Fire District creates 3-phase UAS implementation plan • FDNY launches UAS program for command situational awareness • LAFD launching UAS program for firefighter safety • MDFR, City of Miami FD launching UAS program for multi-mission use
  21. 21. ASCENDING BEYOND THE WALLED GARDEN 21 Flying drones in the radio controlled, visual line- of-sight realm of today is a lot like using dial-up Internet service in the 1990’s The eventual shift to Beyond Visual Line-Of-Sight (BVLOS) operations will unleash an entirely new wave of aviation innovation, unlike anything we have ever seen before.
  22. 22. THE BIG OPPORTUNITY 22 Percentage of companies and municipalities with traditional manned aviation operations Global drone/UAS services market by 2020 according to Goldman Sachs and PwC
  23. 23. 23 SOURCE: Goldman Sachs “Drones Reporting for Work” (May 2017) “The $100 billion market opportunity we forecast over the next five years is just the tip of the iceberg. Drones’ full economic potential is likely to be multiple times that number, as their ripple effects reverberate through the economy.”
  24. 24. DRONE SERVICES BY SECTOR, 2020 24 $45.2 billion Infrastructure $32.4 billion Agriculture $13.0 billion Transportation $10.0 billion Security $8.8 billion Media & Entertainment $6.8 billion Insurance $6.3 billion Telecommunications $4.4 billion Mining $127.3 billion SOURCE: PwC “Clarity from Above” (May 2016)
  25. 25. How do we establish Miami-Dade County as a leader in the emerging drone economy? 25
  26. 26. URGENCY 26 1. Other cities/states are actively vying for their share of the emerging drone economy. 2. South Florida must take action NOW to establish itself as a legitimate player in the industry.
  27. 27. CHALLENGES 27 1. Slow start, need to make up ground 2. Congested airspace 3. Complex regulatory environment 4. Perception: Tourism vs Tech 5. High cost of living, real estate
  28. 28. STRENGTHS OF SOUTH FLORIDA 28 1. Weather and climate 2. Diverse cultures 3. Rich aviation history 4. Major financial institutions 5. Evolving tech scene 6. Emergence upon world stage 7. Proximity to Latin America & Caribbean 8. International air and sea shipping 9. No state income taxes 10.Abundant recreational options
  29. 29. DRONE OPPORTUNITIES FOR MIAMI-DADE 29 1. Develop a commercial drone testing facility. 2. Emerge as a thought leader by hosting key industry conferences. 3. Become the epicenter of Caribbean and Latin American drone sales, distribution, service, and innovation. 4. Look to the future and focus on the “What’s Next” segment of the emerging drone, unmanned, and autonomous economies.
  30. 30. THE FUTURE OF UNMANNED AVIATION 30 1. BVLOS flight operations will be a game changer for the aviation industry. 2. Drones carrying advanced sensors with artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning capabilities will disrupt many industries. 3. Communication networks will be vital for aircraft command and control, as well as data transfer.
  31. 31. THE FUTURE OF UNMANNED AVIATION 31 4. The aircraft carrier of the future may float in the air instead of the sea. 5. Buildings will be redesigned with rooftops that accommodate a wide range of drone use cases. 6. Like the wheel, the locomotive, the automobile, the Internet, and wireless networks -- unmanned aviation will fundamentally change the way we live our lives.
  32. 32. Nobody is going to do the work for us. Success is predicated on the collective efforts of the greater South Florida community, spearheaded in part by the Miami- Dade Beacon Council. Are you ready to pitch in? 32
  33. 33. CONTACT 33 CHRISTOPHER TODD Founder | President ctodd@airborneresponse.com +1 305 771 1120 JAMES C. KOHNSTAMM SVP Economic Development jckohnstamm@beaconcouncil.com +1 305 579 1300

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