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LECTURE
SUBJECT : Is Nepal going the china’s way
VASUPALLI BHOGRAJU
ASSISTANT COMMANDANT
Nepal's historical relations with...
-2-
SUBJECT : Is Nepal going the china’s way
Economic and strategic relations
In the 1970s King Birendra of Nepal proposed...
-3-
SUBJECT : Is Nepal going the china’s way
Non- Interference in internal matters
Despite her mounting clout in global ar...
-4-
SUBJECT : Is Nepal going the china’s way
Connectivity
The 15 districts of the northern part of Nepal share common bord...
-5-
SUBJECT : Is Nepal going the china’s way
The move toward China does not necessarily mean that Nepal is breaking ties w...
-6-
SUBJECT : Is Nepal going the china’s way
Conclusion
Nepal is situated between China and India, and shares long border ...
-6-
SUBJECT : Is Nepal going the china’s way
Conclusion
Nepal is situated between China and India, and shares long border ...
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china nepal

  1. 1. LECTURE SUBJECT : Is Nepal going the china’s way VASUPALLI BHOGRAJU ASSISTANT COMMANDANT Nepal's historical relations with China (and Tibet) have been shaped by conflicts over territory and the control of Tibet. In 1792, Nepal was forced to sign a treaty stipulating the payment of tribute to China after the latter defeated Nepalese forces in Tibet. China refused Nepal's request for assistance during Anglo- Nepalese War (1814–16), and the latter's defeat led to the establishment of the British Empire as the dominant power in the region. Having retained its independence, Nepal continued to try to balance the influence of China and British India. Nepal invaded Tibet in 1854, but hostilities ended soon after China intervened,; the Treaty of Thapathali, concluded in March 1856, recognised the special status of China and Nepal's commitment to help Tibet in the event of foreign aggression. In the 19th century, Nepal aligned itself with the British Raj in India and supported its invasion of Tibet in 1908. When China sought to claim Tibet in 1910, Nepal sided with Tibet and Britain and broke relations with China after Tibet drove Chinese forces out in 1911. Diplomatic relations and Nepalese neutrality The 1950–1951 Invasion of Tibet by the People's Liberation Army raised significant concerns of security and territorial integrity in Nepal and India, drawing both nations into a close relationship with extensive economic and military ties. China ordered restrictions on the entry of Nepalese pilgrims and contacts with Tibet, and increased its support for the Communist Party of Nepal, which was opposed to the Nepalese monarchy. The 1950 Indo-Nepal Treaty of Peace and Friendship that had established a close Indo-Nepalese relationship on commerce, defence and foreign relations, was increasingly resented in Nepal, which began seeing it as an encroachment of its sovereignty and an unwelcome extension of Indian influence; the deployment of an Indian military mission in Nepal in the 1950s increased these concerns. In 1955, Nepal established diplomatic relations with the People's Republic of China and exchanged resident ambassadors by 1960. In 1956, both nations signed a new treaty terminating the Treaty of Thapathali of 1856 and Nepal recognized Tibet as a part of China.[ In 1960, Nepal and China signed a boundary settlement agreement and a separate treaty of peace and friendship. Nepal also began supporting the change of China's seat in the United Nations. In 1961, Nepal and China agreed to build an all-weather road connecting the Nepalese capital Kathmandu with Tibet. During the Sino-Indian War of 1962, Nepal maintained.
  2. 2. -2- SUBJECT : Is Nepal going the china’s way Economic and strategic relations In the 1970s King Birendra of Nepal proposed Nepal as a "zone of peace" between India and China and in the 1980s, Nepal began importing Chinese weaponry in contravention of its 1950 treaty with India and has since sought to establish extensive military cooperation in a move to reduce perceived Indian influence.[ When the United States, United Kingdom and India refused to supply arms to the regime of King Gyanendra of Nepal, who had assumed direct rule to suppress the Maoist insurgency during the Nepalese civil war (1996–2006), China responded by dispatching arms to Nepal, in spite of the ideological affinity of the Maoists with China. After the peace process and national elections in Nepal in 2008, the new Maoist-led government announced its intentions to scrap Nepal's 1950 treaty with India, indicating a stronger move towards closer ties with China. In 2007-08, China began construction of a 770-kilometre railway connecting the Tibetan capital of Lhasa with the Nepalese border town of Khasa, connecting Nepal to China's wider national railway network. Nepal- China Society Realizing the need for a competent organization in order to strengthen as well as add greater dimensions to the close, mutually beneficial, friendly and age-old relationship between Nepal and the neighboring People's Republic of China, Nepal-China society was founded in April, 1993. Primarily, the protocol of the Nepal- China Society is zeroed in on providing an opportunity for the exchange of knowledge and experiences through exchange visits of social workers, social scientists, artists, professors, technicians and experts belonging to the neighbouring nations from various areas to take the mutual ties to newer and greater heights. Remarkably, it is also unwaveringly committed towards buttressing the socio-economic development of Nepal by keeping itself abreast of the phenomenal achievements made by China in almost every vital realm like economy, education, science and technology, arts and culture. Nepal-China Society has also been bringing out books, magazines and souvenirs that shed light on a wide range of the ways of life in Nepal and China. Notably, the Society has been marking the annual celebration of the founding of the People's Republic of China by hosting an exclusively conceived reception program in the capital. The program is graced by high level politicians, government officials, media people, various dignitaries as well as other personalities from various walks of life.
  3. 3. -3- SUBJECT : Is Nepal going the china’s way Non- Interference in internal matters Despite her mounting clout in global arena, China has never made any attempt to meddle in the internal affairs of Nepal. China has always treated her relationship with Nepal from a strategic high and with a long term view. The frequent assurance on the part of China that it will adopt every possible measure to enable Nepal to preserve its independence, sovereignty and territorial integrity corroborates the fact that the emerging super power always wishes for a greater well being of Nepal.By continuously abiding by the principle of non-interference in other's domestic affairs China has been respecting the political system and development path chosen by Nepalese people. China has been generously supporting Nepal in the development activity for the last five decades.Trust, equality and sincerity are three factors that have enabled Nepal China friendship to maintain its strong momentum of growth over the years. Not only their boundary is common but there are innumerous bonds of similarities which have brought Nepal and China very close to each other.Now, it is being increasingly felt that the friendship between Nepal and China should be taken to the next level by fostering people-to-people relations between the two countries. Above all, Nepal and China have also maintained sound coordination and cooperation in regional and international affairs such as peace, development, human rights and UN reform. China's fast expanding economic clout in global arena is also an unmatched opportunity to Nepal. CHINA-NEPAL FRIENDSHIP HIGHWAY This road extends from Katmandu, the capital of Nepal, to Tibet. One can drive from Katmandu, the capital of Nepal, to Zhangmu to enter China. It goes through Nyanlamu, Dingri, Lazi, and Xingeze of the Xingeze area. The road is built with a mixture of sand and stone, which makes it good for travel. The China-Nepal Highway extends 736 km from Lhasa to the Friendship Bridge at Zham, where it enters Nepal and continued on to Kathmandu. It is one of a few major roads utilized by overseas tourists to enter Tibet.
  4. 4. -4- SUBJECT : Is Nepal going the china’s way Connectivity The 15 districts of the northern part of Nepal share common borders with China's Tibet Autonomous Region. The Chinese side attaches great importance to border trade between China and Nepal. The China-Nepal border trade has been developed vigorously since 1962. Currently, there are five major border trading points. There has already been a road linkage between Zhangmu and Kodari. Now the Chinese side is upgrading the infrastructure in Zhangmu Pass and the surrounding road, and is positively considering initiating construction of the dry port near Tatopani in the Nepali side as early as possible. The Syabrubesi- Rasuwagadi road is now under construction under a Chinese grant. After the completion of this road, the Chinese side will push for the establishment of Kyerong Pass, which will mark the inception of the second trade corridor between China and Nepal. Chinese study center Chinese scholars visit Nepal at the invitation of CSC-Nepal and participate in talk programs and seminars. CSC-Nepal has organized such seminars and talk programs at bilateral, regional and international levels. High-ranking political party functionaries, government officials, intellectuals, foreign diplomats, and media persons attend these programs. It has organized seminars with the participation of Chinese experts on important aspects of China-Nepal relations. Each aspect consists of a certain prioritized theme. These themes include political economic ties, external links of the Tibet (Xizang) Autonomous Region, development strategy of West China and Nepal, China's advances in outer space and technology, Buddhism in China and Nepal, China and South Asia, and China and the world. A delegation led by Gui Xiofeng, President Editors Society of China visited CSC-Nepal office in December, 2006. On the occasion he held candid exchange of views with the CSC-Nepal, and also delivered a brilliant talk on "Strengthening the cultural exchanges and cooperation between China and Nepal."
  5. 5. -5- SUBJECT : Is Nepal going the china’s way The move toward China does not necessarily mean that Nepal is breaking ties with India - the government rather seeks to decrease Indian influence. "It is not that China is ideal. It is only to neutralize India. Historically, socially, and culturally Nepal is closer to India. On a political level however the Maoist government wants to avoid being controlled by India as much as possible." This new partnership with China comes at a time of great necessity for Nepal. The country is facing growing insecurity which many experts in Kathmandu believe could escalate into a crisis within the next year. With the decade-long civil war resulting in the overthrow of the monarchy, Nepal is facing the challenges of a newly democratic nation that has innumerable political groups and organizations vying for a tiny amount of resources amid growing insecurity China views the establishing of closer relations with Nepal as an important step in its competition with India for regional influence. "China now seems to view Nepal as a vital bridge toward South Asia as part of strategy of encircling India. However, Nepal's interest in expanding relations with China is more complicated. The country has long sought to balance the interests of India and China, the two regional powers it lies between. Since the signing of the Indo-Nepalese Treaty of 1950, India has come to heavily dominate Nepalese politics. While the treaty acknowledges Nepal's sovereignty, clauses in the agreement give India a greater amount of control over Nepal than the Maoist government would prefer. It is the overbearing influence of India that has pushed Nepal's Maoist government decisively towards China. The shift has been so strong that Premier Prachanda went as far as to break the long-standing tradition of Nepalese heads of state making their first foreign trip to India, instead visiting China, ostensibly to attend the opening ceremony of the 2008 Summer Olympic Games in Beijing. The country's police and army have become polarized, with different groups supporting the Maoists, opposition forces, and even the return of the monarchy. A number of journalists have been attacked in the past six months. Amid simmering discontent within the Maoist Army, which refuses to integrate with the regular army and continues to recruit soldiers, the expected flood of returning immigrants from jobs in the Middle East and Malaysia due to the global financial crisis makes Nepal's immediate future seem grim. Over the past years China has proven itself willing to give large amounts of no-strings-attached cash and support for infrastructure building to countries that support its "One China" policy and allow it to expand its growing global influence. This is in contrast with most Western countries which demand that aid goes to specific projects and require greater oversight regarding where the funds end up.
  6. 6. -6- SUBJECT : Is Nepal going the china’s way Conclusion Nepal is situated between China and India, and shares long border lines with both of them, enjoying an advantageous geographic position. China and India, as two major developing countries in the world, have maintained stable yet fast economic growth in recent years, and effectively boosted the economic development in the region. Nepal want’s to make full use of the geographic advantage and traditional friendship with both countries to create a conducive economic atmosphere, take trade facilitation measures and cultivate professionals so as to benefit from the fast economic development of China and India and stimulate its domestic economic growth.
  7. 7. -6- SUBJECT : Is Nepal going the china’s way Conclusion Nepal is situated between China and India, and shares long border lines with both of them, enjoying an advantageous geographic position. China and India, as two major developing countries in the world, have maintained stable yet fast economic growth in recent years, and effectively boosted the economic development in the region. Nepal want’s to make full use of the geographic advantage and traditional friendship with both countries to create a conducive economic atmosphere, take trade facilitation measures and cultivate professionals so as to benefit from the fast economic development of China and India and stimulate its domestic economic growth.

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