How Does SupplementalSecurity Income Differ FromSocial Security DisabilityInsurance?Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is ...
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How Does Supplemental Security Income Differ From Social Security Disability Insurance

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While SSI and SSDI are both federal SSA programs that provide assistance to people with disabilities, they have different eligibility requirements and benefits.

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How Does Supplemental Security Income Differ From Social Security Disability Insurance

  1. 1. How Does SupplementalSecurity Income Differ FromSocial Security DisabilityInsurance?Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is an income benefit program administered by the SocialSecurity Administration (SSA) for people with limited income and resources who are disabled,blind, or age 65 or older. The SSI program is based on financial need established by income andassets requirements.While SSI and SSDI are both federal SSA programs that provide assistance to people withdisabilities, they have different eligibility requirements. SSI is a means-based program for low-income individuals, so eligibility is based in part on your income and resources. SSDI eligibilityis not based on low income. It is only available to those people who have paid into the federalinsurance program through FICA (or payroll) taxes and who meet the SSA’s definition ofdisability. However, it is possible for some individuals to be eligible for both SSI and SSDI.The requirements aren’t the only difference between SSI and Social Security Disability, theirbenefits differ as well. For example, SSI benefits are not based on your prior work history. SSI isfunded by general funds from the U.S. Treasury, while Social Security benefits are funded byFICA taxes you and your employer paid. In addition, in most states, SSI beneficiaries also mayreceive Medicaid (medical assistance) to pay for hospital stays, doctor bills, prescription drugsand other health costs.You are able to apply for Supplemental Security Income on your own, but keep in mind that youmay be eligible for both SSI and SSDI benefits if you have a qualified work history, limitedincome and resources. A disability representative can help improve your chances of beingawarded these benefits, and more quickly, and usually handles your SSI and SSDI claimssimultaneously. For more information on SSI and SSDI visit allsup.com.

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