Delivering Safety Results in Changing Times - Leveraging EHS Sustainability

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Using sustainable strategies for occupational or environmental health and safety initiatives can save companies money while enhancing safety culture. There are numerous ways to do this beyond traditional inspections and surveys. The business case and value are the drivers for success.

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  • People – Planet – Profits – new mantra for 21st century
  • Begin small and develop small scale bench-top models for experimentation. Engage the commitment of the company to remain competitive even in poor economy. Empower employees at all levels to use their knowledge and talent to come up with ideas. Be resourceful. Explore research opportunities when these ideas are conceived to help improve brand name and product.
  • Avoid clichéd catch-all phrases like “Building a Better Future” Saying sustainability is important but failing to reflect this in stated corporate values which raises doubts about the commitment.
  • Ask all of your stakeholders about how you are doing regarding EHS sustainability, social responsibility, and collaboration with others. Evaluate the impact of your company’s past, look at the present day situation, and envision a brighter more profitable future using these tools for EHS sustainability. Partner with others companies, research organizations, and even competitors to share the financial burden.
  • Ask yourselves how we can do better by making the necessary changes. Look at the short and long-term goals. Compare yourself with other real world cases where progress has been a financial gain. Consider in your thinking that EHS sustainability is the future and how it can be used to view the carbon gap and trade legislation issues. How does this affect your business now?
  • Contaminated land use comes from previous building owners, industrial tenants, and downstream plumes from adjacent contaminated properties. There are a lot environmental strategies that need attention for EHS sustainability. We need to look a lot of different things and set the metrics and goals to achieve these things. Avoidance is not the answer. The competition is moving forward and so should you. It takes proper planning and financing but the ultimate gains are more impressive.
    Air emissions in areas of degraded air sheds or ecologically sensitive areas.
  • Air emissions in areas of degraded air sheds or ecologically sensitive areas. We have ecological boundaries to consider based on facility location, impacts on residential areas or ecologically sensitive areas. We need to consider the impact on the environment both now and in the future.
  • Energy conservation is everyone’s problem. EHS sustainability can help focus on the types of energy efficient products used, disposal of the old products, and the potential EHS hazards that may arise from use of energized equipment including arc flash, electrocution, and shock. We also need to consider crisis management contingencies from natural and other disasters as part of the recovery plan to get the facility online.
  • We have to look close at the number of sampling points within a facility and cost to collect and analyze these water samples. EHS sustainability goals can reduce the amount of waste water and reduce expensive costs associated with sample collection and discharge fees to the municipalities. Their also would be less reporting and more time to attend to other projects.
  • EHS sustainability also considers waste water a useful commodity that can be used for other purposes. Sometimes in-plant filtering or processing can reuse the same water to save cost in the manufacture or operation of the plant.
  • Hazardous materials can be found in the raw materials or created during the manufacturing process. EHS sustainability goals should be established to look at all of the chemicals used and try replacing with more organic or naturally-occurring materials. Also, we need to look had how we handle and use hazardous materials. The transfer process may be redesigned to minimize worker or environmental exposure. Recent plant fires at oil and gas refineries, sugar refineries, etc. have resulted in catastrophic financial losses not to mention the regulator fines and media exposure.
  • The mantra is waste minimization. How can we reduce our waste? Sometimes with a little insight, we can sell some of the non-hazardous waste to be used for other purposes. A financial gain can occur by selling the waste to a vendor who can use it in another process.- “waste not – want not”
  • Prior to land purchases or building construction, we need to know as much as possible about the land, geology, and the building. In New Jersey, building decommissioning must follow the ISRA requirements before a property transfer can occur. If there are issues, then other regulations like CERCLA apply. Land or underground plumes can be contaminated with heavy metals, volatile organic compounds, normally occurring or technologically enhanced radiological materials.
  • EHS sustainability has much to do with the facility design and operation. A review of the operation may lead to great suggestions that normally could have been missed by others. All aspects or retrofitting need an EHS review. Safety showers, fire and electrical issues all need to be considered.
  • Radiological hazards can be found in general industry as well as construction. We recently investigated the cause for higher than expected alpha and beta radiation levels in the absence of normally occurring radium levels.
  • Implementing feasible engineering and/or administrative controls is essential to reduce the cost of PPE. In some cases, there may be no need for PPE due to changes in production, process, etc. This can be a goal toward EHS sustainability.
  • There are a variety of risk and loss control hazards that need to be considered by safety professionals. These issues focus on the short-term gain and the long-term financial consequences of inaction.
  • In short, our output should be cleaner than our input to the process. EHS strategies need to developed and implemented to ensure the environment and workers are protected. We also have to understand our capabilities and plan for the necessary resources in the even of a disaster recovery.
  • Contaminated land use comes from previous building owners, industrial tenants, and downstream plumes from adjacent contaminated properties.
  • Product life cycle is important consideration. It is not what and how it is manufactured but how it will be used and where will it end up for disposal, reuse, or recycle.
  • EHS sustainability should consider the life cycle of the product from conception to design and beyond. We need to look at the relationships within the supply chain and be concerned with our suppliers. Look at the issue of lead- and cadmium painted toys from China. What a public and economic disaster! Brand name will be lost and may never recover despite Wal-Mart name.
  • Metrics used can vary depending on metric tons of products or by revenue of sales.
  • Delivering Safety Results in Changing Times - Leveraging EHS Sustainability

    1. 1. Delivering Safety Results in Changing Times – Leveraging EHS Sustainability Bernard L. Fontaine, Jr., CIH, CSP Windsor Consulting Group, Inc. 1
    2. 2. Delivering Safety Results  Objectives: Economy and business factors driving greater focus toward leveraging EHS sustainability  Attitudes and factors hindering progress  Relationship between sustainability and performance  Gap between personal and company caring  Broad stakeholder alignment with core values  Best practices for EHS business sustainability  Environmental awareness and legislation  2
    3. 3. Delivering Safety Results  Traditional Views of EHS Cost center  Defensive  Risk reduction  Reflection of legal, engineering, and regulatory compliance 
    4. 4. Delivering Safety Results  Emerging Promise of Leveraging EHS       Profit center Innovative Activate other disciplines beyond  Legal, engineering, and regulatory compliance New personnel and generational job opportunities Lean Six Sigma best management principles ANSI Z10, BS 8800, OHSAS 18001 and OHSAS 18002 Standards
    5. 5. Delivering Safety Results  How Can We Leverage EHS Values  Observe – Market drivers and demands  Energy, carbon footprint, globalization, climate change, waste, air and water Design – Business model innovation  Measure – Cost, operations, and metrics  Communicate - Collaboration  5
    6. 6. Delivering Safety Results  How Can We Leverage EHS Values Look for innovative opportunities  Understand changes in the marketplace  Integrate models with CSR and brands  Develop a balanced strategy – past and future  Build collaborative supply chain partnerships  Engage customers and employees  6
    7. 7. Delivering Safety Results  How Can We Leverage EHS Values Introduce Life cycle impact assessment  Build business metrics – platforms and dashboards to illustrate key performance indicators for goal setting and gap analysis  Build credibility and avoid “green” washing  Design communications that resonate  Develop public relations and social media and alternative community building strategies  7
    8. 8. Delivering Safety Results  Organizational Engagement Create similar value under different rubrics  Business value created in different ways based on approach  21st century business trend  EHS value part of organizational culture  EHS managed as integral part of business operation not as a separate activity  8
    9. 9. Delivering Safety Results  Organizational Challenge Senior management  Middle management  Employees  Research and development  Products and services  9
    10. 10. Delivering Safety Results  Organizational Challenge Customers and supply chain  Investors and insurers  Regulatory agencies  Third-party validation, verification, and accreditation  10
    11. 11. Delivering Safety Results  Potential Business Benefits       Human resources – worker and human rights Product and services – research, marketability Risk management and loss prevention Product and process – health and safety Brand name recognition and differentiation License to operate – facility management 11
    12. 12. Delivering Safety Results  Motivations       Ethical considerations Globalization and market forces Social awareness and education Laws and regulation Crises and their consequences Stakeholder priorities 12
    13. 13. Delivering Safety Results  Who needs EHS Sustainability?  Enterprises that could negatively impact the environment, public, community, workers, product or service, process, society, or economy  A business that strives to achieve a triple bottom line concept of people, environment, and profit  Companies seeking greater business value through support of business growth, strengthening risk management, and achieving cost reductions. 13
    14. 14. Delivering Safety Results  Examples of EHS Sustainability  Recycling glass bottles and reuse in design and manufacture of kitchen countertops  Reuse of pulp and paper waste as solid fuel source to operate industrial machinery  Recycle, reuse, and treatment of industrial wastewater for agricultural irrigation 14
    15. 15. Delivering Safety Results  Examples of EHS Sustainability  Collection and reuse of storm water for urban ecological rooftop gardens  Solar cell shingles, wind turbines, construction materials and techniques help achieve energy self-sufficiency for homes, schools, and commercial buildings  Reuse of GM’s Argonaut building as second campus for College of Creative Studies using latest “green” building knowledge and technology 15
    16. 16. Delivering Safety Results  Examples of EHS Sustainability  General Mills stopped paying to landfill oat hulls – now 86% hauled -off and sold a solid fuel  New breaking mechanism on trains captures energy and increases fuel efficiency by 10%  Dell recovered 40,000 tons of unwanted computer equipment 16
    17. 17. Delivering Safety Results  Examples of EHS Sustainability  Wal-Mart funds largest truck makers to develop first diesel-hybrid engines  Philadelphia Eagles became eco-friendly on initiatives to recycle after each game  Reduction of carbon footprint and turning CO2 management into business opportunity 17
    18. 18. Delivering Safety Results  Examples of EHS Sustainability  Sunoco eliminates BPA from the chemical supply chain of children food and water containers  SC Johnson eliminates PVC and chlorine bleached paperboard packaging of products  Kaiser Permanente implements policy to avoid chemicals that cause cancer or reproductive effects in their products 18
    19. 19. Delivering Safety Results  Examples of Lessons Learned  BP Texas City Explosion – Baker Report findings:        No commitment to safety Lack of leading indicators Lack of management EHS knowledge Complacency about serious risks Tolerance of deviations Decentralized management system Failed from previous learning experience 19
    20. 20. Delivering Safety Results  Examples of Lessons Learned       Toyota recall of vehicles with faulty accelerator and brake pedals Honda recall of vehicles with faulty airbags Tylenol recall of products from packaging and contamination issues Chinese drywall in new construction emitting “sulfur-based” compounds into atmosphere Children’s toys coated with lead-based paint Meat-packing plants with bacterial contamination 20
    21. 21. Delivering Safety Results  Education and Learning Process  Dialogue with forward thinking  Collaboration with other business partners  Collecting adequate information – past, current trends, and future 21
    22. 22. Delivering Safety Results  Education and Learning Process  Benchmarking and regulatory compliance  Systemic planning within the organization  Individual and collective learning - concept 22
    23. 23. Delivering Safety Results  Education and Learning Process  Organizational transparency through third-party verification, certification, registration, and public media  Recognition for environmental partnerships, leadership, and commitment to carbon neutral  Influencing business partners, stakeholders, and shareholders 23
    24. 24. Delivering Safety Results  Motivating Factors     Provide information about challenges and achievements to employees, public, and other stakeholders Internal commitment to occupational, environmental, and social responsibility Marketing safety as a tool to illustrate sound principles, planning, and programs Tracking progress toward EHS sustainability 24
    25. 25. Delivering Safety Results  Motivating Factors Develop pilot projects and take planned initiatives company-wide  Commitment to remaining competitive as a global leader in EHS sustainability  Empower employees to use their knowledge and experience to promote ideas  Explore research opportunities for betterment of humanity  25
    26. 26. Delivering Safety Results  Assessing Organizational Performance        Evaluate core values to provide direction, rationale, and sincerity Collaborate with public advocacy groups, colleagues, and researchers Review achievements like EHS awards Conduct an independent audit and review Disseminate information for comment/action Establish social monitors and networks Use lagging/leading indicators for performance 26
    27. 27. Delivering Safety Results  Assessing Organizational Performance      Utilize consumer, supplier, employee, public, and management feedback Evaluate impact on past, current, and future business practices Improve method of collection and availability of performance metrics Communicate with media, public, community, and business partners Implement validation, verification, and test model based design to evaluate metrics 27
    28. 28. Delivering Safety Results  Assessing Organizational Performance Evaluate financial incentives for sustainable development, retrofitting, and manufacturing  Compare real world business cases for sustainable manufacturing and development initiatives  Consider current status of carbon gap and trade legislation – how it affects business and the environment  28
    29. 29. Delivering Safety Results  Environmental Strategies Energy conservation  Air emissions and ambient air quality  Wastewater and ambient water quality  Water conservation  Hazardous materials management  Community noise  Contaminated real estate  29
    30. 30. Delivering Safety Results  Environmental Strategies  Air emissions and ambient air quality      Degraded air shed or ecologically sensitive area Point sources – stack emissions Fugitive emissions – VOC, PM, ozone depleting sources Mobile sources – Land-based (trucks, cars, rails) Greenhouse gases 30
    31. 31. Delivering Safety Results  Environmental Strategies  Energy conservation        Energy management and efficiency Process heat load reduction Heat distribution systems Process cooling load reduction Energy conversion Refrigeration system compression and efficiency Compressed air system load reduction 31
    32. 32. Delivering Safety Results  Environmental Strategies  Wastewater and Ambient Water Quality        Discharge to surface water Discharge to sanitary sewers Land application of treated effluent Industrial and sanitary wastewater management Emissions and residuals from treatment operation Occupational health and safety issues related to wastewater treatment Monitoring 32
    33. 33. Delivering Safety Results  Environmental Strategies  Water Conservation     Water monitoring and management Process water reuse and recycling Building facility operations Heating and cooling systems 33
    34. 34. Delivering Safety Results  Environmental Strategies  Hazardous Materials Management        Hazard risk assessment Release prevention and control planning Occupational health and safety exposures Process knowledge and documentation Hazardous material transfer Overfill protection Chemical reaction, fire, and explosion prevention 34
    35. 35. Delivering Safety Results  Environmental Strategies  Hazardous Materials Management       Secondary containment Storage tank and pipe leaking detection Underground storage tank installation Emergency preparedness and response Community involvement and awareness Storage facilities meeting NFPA and NEC 35
    36. 36. Delivering Safety Results  Environmental Strategies  Waste Management      Planning, prevention, and reuse Treatment and disposal Storage Transportation Monitoring 36
    37. 37. Delivering Safety Results  Environmental Strategies  Contaminated Land      Industrial site remediation investigation action Risk screening Interim and detailed management plan Permanent reduction measures Occupational health and safety considerations 37
    38. 38. Delivering Safety Results  Occupational Health and Safety  Facility Design and Operation       Integrity of workplace structure Severe weather and facility shutdown Workspace design and exits Fire precautions – static, open flame, chemical Lavatories and showers Potable water supply 38
    39. 39. Delivering Safety Results  Occupational Health and Safety  Facility Design and Operation      Clean lunchroom or eating area Adequate general or task lighting Safe means of access and egress First-aid, CPR, and AED Work environment temperature control 39
    40. 40. Delivering Safety Results  Occupational Health and Safety  Hazard Communication and Training       Occupational health and safety instruction Visitor and contractor site orientation New task employee or contractor training Area signage and hazard notification Labeling of equipment Communication of hazard codes and procedures 40
    41. 41. Delivering Safety Results  Occupational Health and Safety  Physical Hazards        Rotating or moving equipment Noise and vibration Electrical shock and arc flash Eye and face hazards Welding and hot work Line breaking Industrial vehicle driving and site traffic 41
    42. 42. Delivering Safety Results  Occupational Health and Safety  Physical Hazards      Extreme working environmental temperatures Ergonomics – repetitive motion, material handling Working heights Interior and exterior illumination levels Other non-ionizing and ionizing radiation hazards 42
    43. 43. Delivering Safety Results  Occupational Health and Safety  Chemical Hazards     Ambient indoor air quality Industrial exposure to dust, mist, fumes, gases Skin absorption and surface contaminants Fire and explosions 43
    44. 44. Delivering Safety Results  Occupational Health and Safety  Chemical Hazards     Corrosive, oxidizing, and reactive agents Carcinogens – animal and human Reproductive agents – teratogens and mutagens Medical surveillance and biological monitoring 44
    45. 45. Delivering Safety Results  Occupational Health and Safety  Biological Hazards      Indigenous insects, plants, and animals Microbial contamination from building envelope Animal and human waste products Bacteria and viruses from infected employees and visitors Contaminated food products or building surfaces from improper sanitation 45
    46. 46. Delivering Safety Results  Occupational Health and Safety  Radiological Hazards    Ionizing radiation – alpha, beta, gamma, x-rays Non-ionizing radiation – UV, visible light, and infrared light Naturally-occurring and technically enhanced or man-made exposures (NORM and TENORM) 46
    47. 47. Delivering Safety Results  Occupational Health and Safety  Personal Protective Equipment      Eye and face protection Gloves and clothing – chemical-resistant, welding. abrasion, and electrical Hardhats and bump caps Respirators – mechanical filter and supplied air Safety shoes and boots 47
    48. 48. Delivering Safety Results  Occupational Health and Safety  Special Hazardous Considerations         Confined space entry Hazardous energy sources Adverse weather conditions Lone and isolated workers Slippery walking or working surfaces Emergency response - containment and control Contractor safety – safe work permit Workplace violence 48
    49. 49. Delivering Safety Results  Community Health and Safety Strategies         Water quality and availability Structural safety of infrastructure Life and fire safety Traffic safety – on-site and off-site Transport of hazardous material or waste Disease prevention – communicable and vectorborne diseases Emergency preparedness and response Recreational and off-duty activities 49
    50. 50. Delivering Safety Results  Construction and Decommissioning     Environmental impact – noise, odor, vibration, soil erosion, public and traffic impedances, ambient air quality, solid waste, hazardous materials, and waste water discharges Construction materials and surface coatings Occupational health and safety issues Community-based health and safety issues 50
    51. 51. Delivering Safety Results  Product Stewardship Strategy  Product Life Cycle (PLC) or Extended Product Responsibility (EPR)      Designers Manufacturers Retailers Consumers Waste management and disposers 51
    52. 52. Delivering Safety Results  Product Stewardship Strategy        Rethink products and market innovations Review relationships in the supply chain Provide customers with more value and less environmental impact Reduce use of toxic substances – heavy metals Design reuse and recyclables Create incentives and take back programs Implement reuse, recycle, and reduction of waste 52
    53. 53. Delivering Safety Results  Product Stewardship Strategy  Examples:       Collect and manage Ni-Cd batteries Remove of mercury-containing products Limit types of plastics and labeling them Return spent computer printer cartridges Utilize post-consumer materials into packaging Evaluate energy efficiency cost 53
    54. 54. Delivering Safety Results  Business Value       Drive business growth Increase market valuation by leveraging EHS stewardships Improve risk management Reduce legal liability and risk for financial disaster Uncover hidden operational risks Protect and enhance corporate and brand image 54
    55. 55. Delivering Safety Results  Business Value       Gain regulatory flexibility for compliance Avoid supply chain surprises Simplify customer responses for data requests Reduce third-party assurance costs Cut annual reporting costs Improve financial performance through metrics for quality, accuracy, timeliness, consistency, and customer satisfaction 55
    56. 56. Delivering Safety Results  Business Value       Automate workflows that mirror work process Set annual achievable objectives and goals Measure and monitor all levels of performance Automatically track and respond to EHS outliers Re-evaluate objectives to minimize risks Continue to upgrade organization for sustainable future 56
    57. 57. Delivering Safety Results  Platform/Dashboard for EHS Sustainability  Internal and External Audits   Verifiable trail…assures compliance reduces management costs…simplifies audits Compliance Manager  Assures regulatory compliance…reduces management costs…boots business performance 57
    58. 58. Delivering Safety Results  Platform/Dashboard for EHS Sustainability  Air Compliance   Automates reporting…performs complex calculations…increases data accuracy…reduces time and effort Water Compliance  Simplifies compliance process…increases report accuracy…improves data consistency 58
    59. 59. Delivering Safety Results  Platform/Dashboard for EHS Sustainability  Waste Compliance   Assures and improves compliance…increases reporting accuracy…avoids manifest errors and shipment returns Chemical Inventory  Tracks hazardous materials…centralizes data storage...supports enterprise best practices 59
    60. 60. Delivering Safety Results  Platform/Dashboard for EHS Sustainability  Incidence Awareness   Reduces risk of future accidents…collects and manages incident data…ranks and prioritizes threats Industrial Hygiene  Assists risk evaluation…enables exposure monitoring…communicates monitoring results 60
    61. 61. Delivering Safety Results  Platform/Dashboard for EHS Sustainability  MSDS Management   Streamlines MSDS process…accesses most current data…standardizes content…aids OSHA compliance Emergency Management  Enables management solutions to near miss and reportable incidents….tracks daily operation and real-time response 61
    62. 62. Delivering Safety Results EHS Goals Progress through 2008 Reduce environmental incidents by 50% Reduced by 32% Reduce energy usage by 20% indexed to revenue Reduced 18% indexed to revenue Reduce green house gas emissions by 20% Reduced 21% indexed to revenue Reduce total waste 30% indexed to revenue Reduced 11% indexed to revenue Reduce water usage 20% indexed to revenue Reduced 26% indexed to revenue Baxter Sustainability Report 62
    63. 63. Delivering Safety Results Product Stewardship Progress through 2008 Apply product sustainable On target for completion in review (PSR) to product 2010 development process (PDP) Implement electronic takeback program Completed program for EU and launched customer “responsibility” program Develop program to eliminate hazardous materials in products and packaging Partner with stakeholders to incorporate requirements into new designs Baxter Sustainability Report 63
    64. 64. Delivering Safety Results Occupational Health/Safety Progress through 2008 Reduce WC cases with days lost to 0.16 Achieved 0.19 in 2008 as compared to 0.30 in 2005 Reduce work-related days lost to 3.98 Achieved 4.23 in 2008 as compared to 7.08 in 2005 Reduce recordable rate to 1.25 Achieved 1.29 in 2008, reduced from 1.52 in 2005 Implement case management Implemented 82% of review in 80% of facilities facilities in 2008 Baxter Sustainability Report 64
    65. 65. Delivering Safety Results Industrial Hygiene Progress through 2008 Ensure 95% industrial sites have IH risk assessments and monitoring plans 90% of industrial sites have IH risk assessments and monitoring plans in-place. Evaluate hearing conservation program and reduce need for hearing protection by 25% Evaluated hearing conservation programs by ACGIH and EU standards. Program completion by 2010 Evaluate respirators and engineering/administrative controls to reduce usage by 25% Exposure sampling resulted in 324 employees no longer needing use of a respirator. 39% reduction Baxter Sustainability Report 65
    66. 66. Delivering Safety Results Questions ? 66

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