0
Why should that interface be accessible?
How would we make that accessible?
To whom should it be accessible?
• blind
• low-vision
• hearing
• mobility/dexterity
• cognitive
• speech
erceivable
perable
nderstandable
obust
P
O
U
R
w3.org/WAI
P O U R
Focuses on user needs, not technology.
Web Accessibility is a Design Tool
Derek Featherstone
feather@simplyaccessible.com
@feather
Accessibility is part of User Experience.
extremes extremes
Accessibility is not binary, all-or-nothing,
black and white. We have every shade of grey
in between. How you view this po...
The checklist is a
starting point,
not an end
point.
Just because something is compliant,
doesn’t mean it will be easy to use.
How can we get beyond the checklist?
Great design, technical excellence, the
right content and functionality.
Great design, technical excellence, the
right content and functionality.
PRINCIPLE 1
Start with content
Content specific to people with disabilities?
PRINCIPLE 2
Move from what to why.
Overlapping Map Polygons: Non-visual access
Different method to get the same information
(Fictitious) proposed boundary changes, City of Ottawa
Does this change affect...
PRINCIPLE 3
Out of sight, out of mind.
GROUP CLOSELY RELATED ITEMS
Layout: Proximity for Low-vision users
Layout: Proximity for Low-vision users
Use layout to create the right "chunks"
Use layout to create the right "chunks"
PRINCIPLE 4
Design for Quick Consumption
Front-loaded
content
USE HEADINGS
FOR QUICK CONSUMPTION
PRINCIPLE 5
Keyboard.Keyboard.Keyboard.
PRINCIPLE 6
Design for forgetfulness.
Summary and Field-level errors
These principles help
make better, more accessible
designs for everyone.
simplyaccessible.com/newsletter
Derek Featherstone
feather@simplyaccessible.com
@feather
Accessibility consulting, strategy and assessments
Accessible development and remediation services
Training courses, works...
Derek Featherstone: Web Accessibility (Webdagene 2013)
Derek Featherstone: Web Accessibility (Webdagene 2013)
Derek Featherstone: Web Accessibility (Webdagene 2013)
Derek Featherstone: Web Accessibility (Webdagene 2013)
Derek Featherstone: Web Accessibility (Webdagene 2013)
Derek Featherstone: Web Accessibility (Webdagene 2013)
Derek Featherstone: Web Accessibility (Webdagene 2013)
Derek Featherstone: Web Accessibility (Webdagene 2013)
Derek Featherstone: Web Accessibility (Webdagene 2013)
Derek Featherstone: Web Accessibility (Webdagene 2013)
Derek Featherstone: Web Accessibility (Webdagene 2013)
Derek Featherstone: Web Accessibility (Webdagene 2013)
Derek Featherstone: Web Accessibility (Webdagene 2013)
Derek Featherstone: Web Accessibility (Webdagene 2013)
Derek Featherstone: Web Accessibility (Webdagene 2013)
Derek Featherstone: Web Accessibility (Webdagene 2013)
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Derek Featherstone: Web Accessibility (Webdagene 2013)

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Transcript of "Derek Featherstone: Web Accessibility (Webdagene 2013)"

  1. 1. Why should that interface be accessible?
  2. 2. How would we make that accessible?
  3. 3. To whom should it be accessible?
  4. 4. • blind • low-vision • hearing • mobility/dexterity • cognitive • speech
  5. 5. erceivable perable nderstandable obust P O U R w3.org/WAI
  6. 6. P O U R Focuses on user needs, not technology.
  7. 7. Web Accessibility is a Design Tool
  8. 8. Derek Featherstone feather@simplyaccessible.com @feather
  9. 9. Accessibility is part of User Experience.
  10. 10. extremes extremes
  11. 11. Accessibility is not binary, all-or-nothing, black and white. We have every shade of grey in between. How you view this point frames everything that you learn and do about accessibility.
  12. 12. The checklist is a starting point, not an end point.
  13. 13. Just because something is compliant, doesn’t mean it will be easy to use.
  14. 14. How can we get beyond the checklist?
  15. 15. Great design, technical excellence, the right content and functionality.
  16. 16. Great design, technical excellence, the right content and functionality.
  17. 17. PRINCIPLE 1 Start with content
  18. 18. Content specific to people with disabilities?
  19. 19. PRINCIPLE 2 Move from what to why.
  20. 20. Overlapping Map Polygons: Non-visual access
  21. 21. Different method to get the same information (Fictitious) proposed boundary changes, City of Ottawa Does this change affect you? Use our Postal Code lookup: Postal code: Search
  22. 22. PRINCIPLE 3 Out of sight, out of mind.
  23. 23. GROUP CLOSELY RELATED ITEMS
  24. 24. Layout: Proximity for Low-vision users
  25. 25. Layout: Proximity for Low-vision users
  26. 26. Use layout to create the right "chunks"
  27. 27. Use layout to create the right "chunks"
  28. 28. PRINCIPLE 4 Design for Quick Consumption
  29. 29. Front-loaded content
  30. 30. USE HEADINGS FOR QUICK CONSUMPTION
  31. 31. PRINCIPLE 5 Keyboard.Keyboard.Keyboard.
  32. 32. PRINCIPLE 6 Design for forgetfulness.
  33. 33. Summary and Field-level errors
  34. 34. These principles help make better, more accessible designs for everyone.
  35. 35. simplyaccessible.com/newsletter
  36. 36. Derek Featherstone feather@simplyaccessible.com @feather
  37. 37. Accessibility consulting, strategy and assessments Accessible development and remediation services Training courses, workshops and conferences simplyaccessible.com feather@simplyaccessible.com @feather on twitter Derek Featherstone
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