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Active reading social reading
Active reading social reading
Active reading social reading
Active reading social reading
Active reading social reading
Active reading social reading
Active reading social reading
Active reading social reading
Active reading social reading
Active reading social reading
Active reading social reading
Active reading social reading
Active reading social reading
Active reading social reading
Active reading social reading
Active reading social reading
Active reading social reading
Active reading social reading
Active reading social reading
Active reading social reading
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Active reading social reading

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  • 1. Active reading & reading-to-learn skills in the digital age : Moving toward social reading ? NGUYEN Van ToanFebruary 21, 2012 toan.fle@gmail.com
  • 2. Active reading & reading-to-learn skills in the digital ageTheoretical framework Moore (1989). Three types of interaction Learner – content interaction Learner – teacher interaction Learner – learner interaction« The first type of interaction is interaction between the learner and the content orsubject of study. This is a defining characteristic of education. Without it therecannot be education, since it is the process of intellectually interacting with contentthat results in changes in the learners understanding, the learners perspective, orthe cognitive structures of the learners mind. » 2
  • 3. Active reading & reading-to-learn skills in the digital ageTheoretical framework • Levy & Muranne (2004) « […] students must be able to read expertly, think critically, and communicate effectively through writing and reading » • Zywica & Gomez (2008) « With decoding and other basic skills in place, most learner use reading as the most fundamental tool in learning » 3
  • 4. Active reading& reading-to-learn skills in the digital age Know-how How to interact with material ? 4
  • 5. Active reading & reading-to-learn skills in the digital age How to do ? How to read actively and efficiently ? using annotation « By using approaches like annotation, students learn to read more effectively and learn content area topics more deeply » Zywica & Gomez (2008)« You didn’t truly own a book (spiritually, intellectually) until you had marked it up » 5
  • 6. Active reading & reading-to-learn skills in the digital ageAnnotation is the reading data Annotation may involve:  circling important points  underlining key sentences  rephrasing the authors language into your own words  raising questions  defining key words, or words that are difficult  jotting down doubts and criticisms  writing down observations about the tone or structure of the text…  summarizing important passages 6
  • 7. Active reading& reading-to-learn skills in the digital age 7
  • 8. Active reading& reading-to-learn skills in the digital age 8
  • 9. Active reading& reading-to-learn skills in the digital age 9
  • 10. Active reading and reading-to-learn skills Moving toward social reading ? Photo : Luc-Legay 10
  • 11. Active reading and reading-to-learn skills Moving toward social reading ?How to support online active reading ? Collaborative annotation tools, such as http://diigo.com http://www.mystickies.com/ http://students.open.ac.uk/annotate/expand the concept of social bookmarking by allowing readers notonly to share bookmarks but also digitally annotate web pages. 11
  • 12. Active reading and reading-to-learn skills Moving toward social reading ?How to support online active reading 12
  • 13. Active reading and reading-to-learn skills Moving toward social reading ? 13
  • 14. Active reading and reading-to-learn skills Moving toward social reading ?How does it work, digital annotation ?Digital annotation tools require  Registration and plug-in installed  Superimposition of a «layer » over any web page /content.  This layer stores comments, highlighting and notes…and can be seen only by those who have permitted 14
  • 15. Active reading and reading-to-learn skills Moving toward social reading ?Why is it significant for the reader ?The activity of adding reflections as marginalia moves student from being passiveconsumer to active reader who interact with material to work collaborately to find, and evaluate information,The tool offers new way for students to share ideas and create knowledge, to save and manage all referencesCollaborative annotation facilitate the incremental growth of information as usersreview others’ thoughts on a resource before adding their own. 15
  • 16. Active reading and reading-to-learn skills Moving toward social reading ?Where is it going ? Moving toward Social reading ? 16
  • 17. Active reading and reading-to-learn skills Moving toward social reading ?What are the implications for learning and teaching ?  Social active reading is important for learner  Knowledge is created through social interaction  Gifted students’ reading comprehension needs - critical thinking - metacognition process But using annotation and « making text is something readers do outside of school; it is what we need to do with students in school, too. » Porter-O’Donnell (2004) 17
  • 18. Active reading and reading-to-learn skills Moving toward social reading ?What are the implications for learning and teaching ? For the social reading, what do we have to do to get there ?We should teach students to apply higher order thinking skills as digital annotation  manipulate content (interact with contents)  internalize meaning in order to  share / publish their thoughts, ideas, comments, questions  collaboratively generate new meaning  annotate texts and material 18
  • 19. Active reading and reading-to-learn skills Moving toward social reading ?So, do these changes and developments provokeanxiety or opportunity ? It depends on YOU 19
  • 20. ReferencesAdler, M.J. and van Doren, C. (1972). How to Read a Book. Simon and Schuster, New York, NY.Chambers, J (2008). Using Diigo Annotation Tools for Intensive Language Feedbackhttp://www.utechtips.com/2008/11/17/using-diigo-annotation-tools-for-intensive-language-feedback/Educause (2009). Seven things you should know about : collaborative annotation.Lohmann, S. Thalmann, S. Harrer, A et Maier, R (2008). Learner-Generated annotation of learning resources- Lessons from experiments on tagging. International Conference on Knowledge Management I-KNOW 08,Graz, Austria.Moore M-G. (1989). Editorial : Three types of interaction. American Journal of Distance EducationMack, H & Ojalvo, H.E (2011). Briefly Noted : Practicing useful annotation strategies. The Newyork Times.Marton, F., Hounsell, D. and Entwistle, N., (eds.) The Experience of Learning: Implications for teaching andstudying in higher education. 3rd (Internet) edition. Edinburgh: University of Edinburgh, Centre for Teaching,Learning and Assessment. pp. 106-125.Porter-O’Donnell, C (2004). Beyond the yellow highlighter : Teaching annotation skills to improve readingcomprehension. English journal, Vol 93, No 5.Zywica, J & Gomes, K (2008). Annotating to support learning in the content areas : Teaching and learningscience. Journal of Adelescent & Adult Literacy 52(2). 20

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