Who for tom's i pad

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  • You or the people you rely on make hiring mistakes. WSJ named this topic (HIRING) THE most important topic in business. Collins popularized the ideal that “Who” decisions are more important that “what” decisions. Want you to walk away with 20 or more take-aways. What do other successful business owners & entrepreneurs do? Who problems are preventable.
  • Who not what
  • Art Critic When it comes to judging art, going on gut instinct sometimes works just find. A good art critic can make an accurate appraisal of a painting within minutes. With executive hiring though, people who think they are naturally equipped to “read” people on the fly are setting themselves up to be fooled big time. The Prosecutor Many managers act like the prosecutors they see on TV. They aggressively question candidates, attempting to trip them up with trick questions and logic problems. Chatterbox This technique has a lot in common with the “la-di-da” interview. The conversation goes something like “How about them Broncos.” You grew up in California? Me too...
  • The Suitor Rather than rigorously interviewing a candidate, some spend all of the energy selling the applicant on the opportunity. Suitors are more concerned with impressing candidates than assessing their capabilities. The spend all of their time talking and virtually no time listening. Fortune teller: Like to ask their candidates to look into the future regarding the job at hand by asking hypothetical questions “What would you do? How would you do it? Could you do it?” Fifty years of academic literature on interview methods make a strong case against using these types of questions. “If you were going to resolve a conflict with a co-worker, how would you do it?” Trickster: There are interviewers who use gimmicks to test for certain behaviors. They might throw a wad of paper on the floor, for example, to see if a candidate is willing to clean it up, or take him to a party to see how he interacts with other partygoers.
  • Psyc tester: Would you rather be at a cocktail party or at work on a Friday night? is not useful though it is an actual question on popular psych tests. Aptitude: Should never become the sold determinant in a hiring decision. Use of screening but do not use in isolation. The Sponge A common approach among busy managers is to let everybody interview a candidate. The goal of this sponge-like behavior is to soak up information by spending as much time with people as possible. Unfortunately, managers rarely coordinate their efforts leaving everyone to ask the same, superficial questions.
  • Geoff Smart’s book NY Times Best Seller “Who Solve Your #1 Problem” and the #1 ranked best seller on Amazon.
  • You can’t outsource this activity. You can’t delegate this.
  • I work too hard. I have too much urgency for results.
  • Only use Topgrading interview as the heavy artillery for the last 2 people.
  • Only use Topgrading interview as the heavy artillery for the last 2 people.
  • Who for tom's i pad

    1. 1. Solving Your #1 Problem Tom Krekel
    2. 2. The ability to make good decisions regarding people represents one of the last reliable sources of competitive advantage, especially since so few organizations are good at it.Peter Drucker
    3. 3. NY Times Best Selling book “Who: Solve Your #1 Problem, Geoff Smart and Randy Street.Based on interviews with 20 billionaire and 30 CEOs of multi-billion dollar companies80 CEOs of large and entrepreneurial companies, Private equity investors,Experience with 15,000 hiresUniversity of Chicago did largest-ever statistical study
    4. 4. Who mistakes happen when managers:Are unclear about what is needed in a jobHave a weak flow of candidatesDo not trust their ability to pick out the right candidate from a group of similar looking candidatesLose candidates they really want to join their team
    5. 5. The art critic The prosecutor Chatterbox
    6. 6. The Fortune TellerThe Suitor The Trickster
    7. 7. The Aptitude Tester The SpongeThe Psyc Tester
    8. 8. The “A” Method
    9. 9. The “A” MethodDocument exactly whatyour want a person toaccomplish in a role
    10. 10. The “A” MethodGenerating a flow of theright candidates
    11. 11. The “A” Method Structured interview to gather the relevant facts to rate a scorecard and make an informed hiring decision
    12. 12. The “A” MethodAn approach forpersuading candidates
    13. 13. SCORECARD Mission Outcomes Culture
    14. 14. SCORECARD Ninja tip: “look for specialists, not generalists”
    15. 15. SOURCE What is the NUMBER 1 method of finding great people?
    16. 16. Awww, really, that’s it?
    17. 17. Sourcing ChallengeSeeking referrals• “Who are the most talented people you know that I should consider hiring?”• I will commit to calling at least one of these contacts a week until I have called them all. (yes/no)Recruiting Bounty• I will consider offering employees a referral bounty for recruiting of $___ and make a go/no decision by (date).Deputize Friends• I will consider offering external Recruiting Deputies $___ for recruiting viable candidates by (date).
    18. 18. Sourcing ChallengeSeeking referrals• “Who are the most talented people you know that I should consider hiring?”• I will commit to calling at least one of these contacts a week until I have called them all. (yes/no)Recruiting Bounty• I will consider offering employees a referral bounty for recruiting of $___ and make a go/no decision by (date).Deputize Friends• I will consider offering external Recruiting Deputies $___ for recruiting viable candidates by (date).
    19. 19. SELECT Screening Topgrading Focused Reference
    20. 20. T O R C truth serum • Threat • Of • Reference • Check
    21. 21. The Screening Interview1. What are your career goals?2. What are you really good at professionally? • Please give me some examples.1. What are you not good at or not interested in? • Please give me some examples.1. Who were your last 5 bosses, and how will they each rate your performance when we talk with them? (1-10)? Why?
    22. 22. What are you not good at or notinterested in? What’s a weakness? Don’t let them off. •Re-frame •Re-phrase •Re-ask •Just shut up at wait
    23. 23. The Topgrading Interview®• Education (5 minutes)• For each job in the past 15 years (20-30 minutes per job) 1. What were you hired to do? 2. What accomplishments are you most proud of? 3. What were some low points during that job?
    24. 24. The Topgrading Interview® 4. Who were the people you worked with? Specifically: A. Bosses: What was your boss’s name? How do you spell that? What was it like working with him/her? What we he or she say were your biggest strengths? Areas for improvement? A. Teams: How would you rate the team you inherited on an A, B, C scale? 5. Why did you leave that job?• What are your career goals for the future? (10 minutes)
    25. 25. Some push back on doing a three hour Topgrading interview3 hours on average, 5 hours for a CEOFor every hour in the Topgrading Interview you save hundreds of hours by not dealing with C players. The return on your time is staggering.
    26. 26. How do you know if an accomplishment a person tells you is great, good or OK or lousy? The three P’s Clarifying questions.How did your performance compare to the previous year’s performance?How did your performance compare to the plan?How did it compare to that of peers?
    27. 27. Push versus pullPush “it was mutual”It was time for me to leaveMy boss and I were not getting alongPull: My biggest client hired meMy old boss recruited me to a bigger job.The CEO asked me to take a double promotion
    28. 28. SELL Fit Family Freedom Fortune Fun
    29. 29. Reference InterviewFirst question is a conversation starterThe next two questions are exactly the same as the screening interview.The 3rd question is more powerful when you add: BACK THEN.They liberate a reference to talk about weaknesses that existed in the past.Surely, they might assume, the person has corrected those weaknesses.At least they can tell themselves they aren’t being critical of the candidate in the present tense.
    30. 30. Questions:Can Candidates really get their former bosses to talk?YES Since 1990 when candidates arrange the interview 90% of the references are will to talk.Definition of a high performerTop 10%, B’s are next 25% and C’s are bottom 65%
    31. 31. People aren’t mutual funds.Past performance really is an indicator of future success.
    32. 32. RED FLAGS: The candidate…..does not mention past failuresexaggerates his or her answerstakes credit for the work of otherspoorly of past bossesCan’t explain past job movesSeems more interested in compensation and benefits than the job itselfTries too hard to look like an expert
    33. 33. Questions: Turned to someone around you here that you don’t know and share your best guess“What is the cost of the average hiring mistake in terms of the employee’s base salary?”“What percentage of new hires turn out to be high performers?” (25%)Would you enthusiastically rehire everyone on your team?
    34. 34. An A player top 10% of talent available,At the given comp levelIn that specific company, with a certain organizational structureIn that particular industryIn that locationWith specific accountabilitiesWith available resourcesReporting to a specific person
    35. 35. Jay Jordan, CEO of the JordanCompany hired a guy who looked great on paper.While terminating the fellow asked why..“I hired your resume. But unfortunately what I go was you.”

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