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Tegan Waters' WebQuest for EDUC331 - Great Movie, Better Book

Tegan Waters' WebQuest for EDUC331 - Great Movie, Better Book

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    Tegans Web Quest Ppt Tegans Web Quest Ppt Presentation Transcript

    • Links Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Designed by Tegan Waters [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Great Movie, Better Book A WebQuest for 8 th grade English Elective Process Page Two Process Page Three
    • Introduction Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Welcome to Hollywood! This is Tinseltown – the land where dreams are made. As up-and-coming members of the world of filmmaking, you have the tremendous burden before you of adapting a book into a movie. It will not be simple, but with the right tools, and a little bit of creativity, you will be able to come up with some great scenes for your new feature presentation. As producer of your film, I will divide you into groups of three to work on your next big blockbuster. You will each take on an important role in the process – the screenwriter, the cinematographer, or the director. You will learn more about these three crucial roles in a moment. Process Page Two Process Page Three Links
    • The Task Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Of the four novels we have read as a class this semester, you and your teammates, or filmmaking “crew” are going to choose the one that you will use to create a movie. Your ultimate goal is to come up with all the pieces that go into making a great film. You will be implementing knowledge you have learned about how to use Microsoft publisher, and you will also be submitting typed documents. Most importantly however, you will actually be using a digital camera to videotape your scenes. The story is already there for you; you must only choose two meaningful parts to represent. At the end of filming your great new movie, you will share your work with the voting committee of the most prestigious film award of our time – the Waterjug. Title The highly coveted Waterjug Process Page Two Process Page Three Links
    • The Process Links Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] You have already been assigned to your filmmaking crew (or groups of three – you and two other classmates). Together the three of you have decided to create your movie using two meaningful scenes in one of the four novels we have read this semester. Remember, these include: ~ Matilda , by Roald Dahl ~ Tuck Everlasting , by Natalie Babbitt ~ Bridge to Terabithia , by Katherine Paterson ~ Of Mice and Men , by John Steinbeck What about these films stood out to you? Think about the characters, setting, dialogue, etc. What are the similarities between the book and the movie? What are the differences? With these questions in mind, you will each vie for one of the premier roles in the industry – screenwriter, director, or cinematographer. Filmmaking is an intensely collaborative effort, and just like in Hollywood, you and your classmates will work together as a team to create two (2) scenes from this semester’s novel of your choice. Process Page Two Process Page Three
    • The Process Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Take some time to look through the websites on the links slide. These will tell you about the various requirements associated with the jobs in the industry. Using this information, decide whether you want to be a screenwriter, a director, or a cinematographer. (Please bear in mind, you will all be working together as a team, sharing in the responsibilities of this assignment.) In addition to the tasks assigned to all of you in this WebQuest, you will each have one additional responsibility: Screenwriter – you will transcribe (type up) the script you and your classmates create. Turn in a final copy (typed and free of spelling or grammatical errors) to your producer (me) no later than next Friday. Cinematographer – you will sign the sheet to check out a digital camera. You are responsible for getting any additional materials you may need, such as film or a tripod. You must keep the camera safe and turn it back in at the end of your project. Director – Your task is to design the storyboard as you and your classmates discuss ideas about the scenes you will make from your novel. Process Page Two Process Page Three Links
    • The Process Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] All three of you will manage the multitudinous bits and pieces of this assignment together, working as a team. However, use your strengths to your advantage to make your movie the best that it can be. After you have chosen the two scenes you wish to recreate, you must begin to storyboard. Your scenes do not need to flow smoothly together; they can be any important aspect of the novel that you wish to work with. Please print out and use the storyboard template for which you will find a link on the following page. The storyboard will serve as a rough basis for the dialogue that you will put into your script. This is a written version of how you hope your scene will come out after filming. Once you have planned out your scenes, you are ready to find actors! Decide how many people you will need, and what kind of characteristics they must possess to be chosen for a role. Then use Microsoft Publisher to make a flyer advertising your auditions. We will hold auditions the last Friday before the long weekend. All that’s left now is to film and present! Good luck to you, and remember, your producer is available should you have any questions. Process Page Two Process Page Three Links
    • Links Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] http:// www.craftyscreenwriting.com/hook.html http://wikipedia.org/ http://www.hitsquad.com/news/features/interview_with_film_composer_cody_westheimer/ http://www.bottin.it/thesis/ http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-a-cinematographer.htm http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/394107/motion-picture/52246/Role-of-the-cinematographer#tab=active~checked%2Citems~checked&title=motion%20picture%20%3A%3A%20Role%20of%20the%20cinematographer%20--%20Britannica%20Online%20Encyclopedia http://www.ehow.com/how_2138524_adapt-books-scripts.html http://208.64.132.42/blog-entry/Thinking/Adapt-Popular-Book/800031365 http://hhh.gavilan.edu/rbeede/DM140Web/Storyboard_template.jpg http://desktopvideo.about.com/od/glossary/g/Director.htm http://oak.cats.ohiou.edu/~hartleyg/250/freytag.html Process Page Two Process Page Three Links
    • Links Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Process Page Two Process Page Three Beginning 1 Developing 2 Accomplished 3 Exemplary 4 Storyboard The storyboard is either missing (0) or so incomplete as to be irrelevant. There is no supplemental information included to provide aid in completing the WebQuest. Only (1) storyboard is submitted, and it contains all of the important aspects of a scene, including setting, characters, plot points, etc. At least (2) storyboards are submitted - one for each scene. They show some of the important aspects of a scene, including setting, characters, plot points, etc. At least (2) storyboards are submitted - one for each scene. They show all of the important aspects of a scene, including setting, characters, plot points, etc. Audition Flyer Audition Flyer is either missing (0) or so incomplete as to provide little or no help in determining the need for actors. Audition Flyer demonstrates some creativity and includes a basic need for actors, including number, sex, age, physical characteristics, special talents, etc. Audition Flyer is colorful and informative. It describes some of the need for actors, including number, sex, age, physical characteristics, special talents, etc. Audition Flyer is colorful, informative, and complete. It describes the need for actors, including number, sex, age, physical characteristics, special talents, etc. Script The storyboard is either missing (0) or so incomplete as to be irrelevant. There is no supplemental information included to provide aid in completing the WebQuest. Only (1) storyboard is submitted, and it contains all relevant information, including characters, dialogue, directions, props, etc. At least (2) storyboards are submitted - one for each scene. They contain some information, such as characters, dialogue, directions, etc. At least (2) scripts are submitted - one for each scene. They contain all relevant information, including characters, dialogue, directions, props, etc. Mechanics Submitted documents are not typed, or have so many misspellings or grammatical errors that they are illegible. Most of the submitted documents are typed, with a few misspellings or grammatical errors. All submitted documents are typed, with almost no misspellings or grammatical errors. All submitted documents are typed, with no misspellings or grammatical errors. Video Adaptation Video Adaptation is either missing (0) or incomplete to the point that scenes from the novel are not accurately represented. Only (1) scene is represented, with most major characters, plot points, setting clues, themes, dialogue exchanges, etc. that were important to that scene in the novel. (2) separate scenes are represented, with most relevant characters, plot points, dialogue exchanges, etc. that were important in the novel. (2) separate scenes are represented, with all major characters, plot points, themes, dialogue exchanges, etc. important to those scenes in the novel.
    • Conclusions Links Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] You determined the most important aspects of a great story, and then put them into motion using research and technology. You have transformed the written word into moving pictures – no easy feat! You’ve all done an admirable job. Hollywood is ready for you: Audiences are lining up across the nation (or at least the school) to see your groundbreaking film. Sign up for a time slot to share what you have created, and remember to smile! You are all now masters of entertainment. Congratulations! You have successfully taken a novel and made a film! You should be proud of yourselves and all your hard work. You have each been nominated to win the Waterjug, so prepare a brief statement explaining to your colleagues (classmates) why your film deserves this honor. Voting will commence after the film viewing party. Process Page Two Process Page Three
    • Credits & References Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Thanks to the authors of the “Links” page websites for information about filmmaking, and to Longmont High School for the elective class – Great Movie, Better Book that inspired this project. Informational Websites used can be found on the “Links” page of this powerpoint presentation. In addition, http://webquest.org/index.php and http://www.slideshare.net/group/webquest were useful. Film reel machine photo appears courtesy of benjamin.lim from flickr.com – some rights reserved. Noncommercial use, and attribution. http://flickr.com/photos/blim8183/276915005/ Process Page Two Process Page Three Links
    • Great Movie, Better Book A WebQuest for 8 th grade English Elective [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Designed by Tegan Waters [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Process Two
    • Introduction (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This WebQuest is part of the educational technology class at Colorado State University. I got the idea from an elective class at my high school called Great Movie, Better Book, designed to get students more interested in reading. Once they had read the book then they spent a class period watching the movie. I thought that the idea of text and film relating to each other was neat, and so I took it and ran with it. I like to think that students have more fun and a higher level of interest when they get to make things with their own hands and minds. I know the reality for many students is that they dislike reading, so my hope is that they will read more actively and engage more with the text when they know they get to film scenes from one of the novels. It still requires them to discern the most important parts, but it allows for ample creativity and cooperation. I think it is a good way to bring them outside the text. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Process Two
    • Learners (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page I designed this WebQuest with middle school aged students in mind. It relates directly to a language arts (reading/writing) class, but could be paired really well with a technology course to make the movie. The design of the lesson could be applied to any grade based on which novels are adapted. Senior honors English classes could do it with Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness and Apocalypse Now. As long as the students have a basic knowledge of technology, and can follow instructions for using a camera to put together film clips, they should have fun with this assignment. This activity should follow instruction in basic literary devices, as well as a thorough discussion about the similarities and differences between fiction and film. As long as students grasp the necessary components to tell a good story, they can let their imaginations run wild and learn the technology piece of it as they go. It’s a fairly easy thing to work out, and they can relay on one another and help from the teacher if they get confused. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Process Two
    • Curriculum Standards (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
      • Language Arts Standards Addressed
        • Apply thinking skills to reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing.
        • Use information to produce a quality product.
        • Read and recognize literature as a record of human experience.
        • .
      • This lesson addresses many of the language arts standards, because it incorporates reading fiction, analyzing information, doing internet research, putting together a presentation using technology, and giving a presentation to peers and teachers. Students must engage in higher-level thinking to accomplish these tasks, including analyzing fiction, making inferences, using teamwork to develop an idea and follow through with a creatively put-together project, and finally a persuasive statement to argue why their adaptation was the best/most entertaining/whatever and deserves the award.
      Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Process Two
    • The Process (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page The process is detailed in the student process page(s), but it is important to remember that they are trying to make an adaptation of a novel they are familiar with, so they should bear in mind the important aspects of that novel. They must retain some of the original author’s vision, while putting their own creative spin on it. They each have a role to assume, but I just want those to pertain to extra little responsibilities. All three group members should work together to do each of the pieces, and if they argue over roles you can have them draw straws or pick numbers, because the roles are less important to the overall project. When the students choose the scenes they want to adapt, they should be two that are markedly different from each other, but both should tell you something about the novel. It is fine if more than one group chooses the same scene, because they will have varying interpretations. They should start with a storyboard to help them produce their script. Once they have a script they will know what they need as far as actors (I am having my students act in each others’ scenes) and they can make their casting call. Once they have a team together, they can check out a camera and film the scenes. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Process Two
    • The Process (Teacher) – Page II [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson will take several weeks to complete. For my class, they had two weeks to read each of the four novels, and four weeks to do this WebQuest. They will have several days in the computer lab to work, so that no one is stuck needing the software at home. It can apply to only a language arts class, or it can be paired with credit for a technology course, if the instructors collaborate before hand. As “producer” of their movie, I will divide them into groups of my choosing. Then the three of them will choose their roles and select the other students they want as actors. The teacher will need to have a working knowledge of the software being used, (probably moviemaker) so that if the student shave questions or need aid they aren’t alone. Provided that the technology piece works out, this lesson is simple and fun to use, perfect for assessing reading comprehension levels. It can be used by new or experienced teachers, singly or in tandem with others. I would use it in a solo classroom with ample time in a computer lab, but there are many other options. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Process Two
    • Resources (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
      • This assignment requires a lot of use with technology. Lab time should be implemented in case students don’t have access to it at home. Here are some things kids will use:
        • Microsoft PowerPoint
        • Microsoft Word
        • Microsoft Publisher
        • Digital Video Cameras (1 per group of 3 – class set)
      • One teacher should be able to implement this activity, but it would be fun to collaborate with others. The crucial point to involve as many other people as possible, (including other classes – teachers and students, or parents) will be at the end. When the groups present their movies, it will be nice to have an audience to present to, and other teachers will make up the judging board for the Waterjug award.
      Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Process Two
    • Evaluation (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page For the most part, students will have been successful if they were able to visually represent a novel that they read in class. I will be looking for planning materials so that I know they weren’t putting it together at the last minute, but the finished product will really be a demonstration of their creativity and understanding of the text. All submitted written documents should be typed and free of spelling and grammar errors. The film itself should be well edited so that it flows as a scene from a movie. The speech for why they deserve the Waterjug award should be written out and rehearsed so that they can deliver it concisely and clearly. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Process Two
    • Teacher Script (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Teachers should say something like this at each point in the process, so the students know what they should be doing. This is supplemental to the instructional powerpoint, and as always the teacher will have questions that aren’t accounted for here. “ Now that you have been assigned to your groups of three, you should look at the links page and read some of the websites about directors, screenwriters, and cinematographers. Decide which role you would like to play, and make sure that each one is covered in your group. Then choose the novel you want to adapt. Talk about what the most important or meaningful parts of the novel were, and decide which two scenes you would like to represent visually. Make notes about who the characters are in that scene, what they say, what they do, and how they move. Also make note of where they are (setting) or what they are talking about (props) that you might need to show in your film. Draw sketches of these things for your storyboard, including what you want the characters to say. Use the dialogue clues to make your script, and the characters in your scenes to make your audition flyer. Once you select your actors, you are ready to check out a camera and begin filming!” Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Process Two
    • Conclusion (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This WebQuest is difficult and involved, but with the proper scaffolding it can be a lot of fun for students and teachers. It demonstrates an understanding of key literary devices and important aspects of storytelling. It makes students work together and make mutual decisions regarding choices and creations, and they take on roles outside of themselves and outside the classroom so that they may begin to learn about a job in the film industry. Within the class, they are learning about author voice, fact vs. fiction and text vs. film, accuracy and relevancy of info, human experiences and various ways of presenting those, as well as skills with internet research and technology use. It satisfies multiple standards, and can act as an assessment or final project, or simply a fun task to fulfill different components of the curriculum. Whatever choice you make, your students will enjoy it and learn from it, which is the ultimate goal in the long run. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Process Two
    • Credits & References (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Thanks to the authors of the “Links” page websites for information about filmmaking, and to Longmont High School for the elective class – Great Movie, Better Book that inspired this project. Informational Websites used can be found on the “Links” page of this powerpoint presentation. In addition, http:// webquest.org/index.php and http:// www.slideshare.net/group/webquest were useful. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion http://flickr.com/photos/joebenjamin/158358311/ JoeBenjamin => http://flickr.com/photos/fil/3151423/ Phil Moore http://flickr.com/photos/leandropena/2447244818/ <= Leandro Pena