Typing Never Hurt Anyone! Teaching Responsible Citizenship in the Digital Age
 
<ul><li>Digital Access </li></ul><ul><li>Digital Commerce </li></ul><ul><li>Digital Etiquette </li></ul><ul><li>Digital Co...
Dangers in a Digital Society
 
Inappropriate Use
 
Creation of a Responsible Digital Citizen
 
 
Questions <ul><li>How do we change the laize faire attitude of many teens and adults towards acceptable and unacceptable o...
Recommended Readings <ul><li>Borgia, L. G., Myers, J. (2010) Cyber Safety and Children’s Literature: A Good Match for Crea...
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Typing Never Hurt Anyone: Teaching Responsible Citzenship in the Digital Age

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ETL523 Assignment One

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  • Typing Never Hurt Anyone: Teaching Responsible Citizenship in the Digital Age Rapidly changing society has resulted in new way of living, learning, communicating Need to redefine how we interact with others, especially in the virtual world Also how we teach today’s youth has to be reviewed The impact/consequences of these changes are also evolving We need to develop policies, procedures and attitudes that are also flexible
  • What is Digital Citizenship? Definition Thomas Jefferson stated that ‘an informed citizenry is needed for a sound democracy’ This now needs to be extended into the cyber environment as well as beyond national borders Difficult to establish a single definition Some such as Bennett, Wells and Rank see it as a way of engaging the youth of today with politics, social involvement and civics Ribble and Greenhow see it more as a series of behaviours and attitudes and use the 2007 NETS.S definition as a guideline ‘ ability to practice and advocate online behaviour that demonstrates legal, ethical, safe and responsible uses of information and communication technologies’
  • What is Digital Citizenship? What does this mean? Ribble and Bailey have identified 9 elements of digital citizenship Flexibility comes with looking at individual elements Can be tailored to the needs of the school and community Do not have to be all done at once Digital Access Full and equal access to technology Digital Commerce Buying and selling goods online Digital Etiquette Standards of behaviour expected by other digital users Digital Communication Electronic exchange of information Digital Literacy Ability to use digital technology and knowing when and how to use it Digital Law Legal restrictions governing technology use Digital Security Steps taken to ensure both personal and network safety Digital Health and Wellness Physical and psychological well-being Digital Rights and Responsibilities Privileges and freedoms of all digital users and the accompanying behavioural expectations Ultimate goal to is develop an awareness of cyber/digital behaviour and possible consequences
  • Dangers in a Digital Society What does this include? Psychological / Social Placed together as quite often there are overlapping causes and consequences Over-reliance or use of technology can result in a decrease of social skills and face-to-face interactions Roberts highlights the formation of ‘cyber addiction’ Often children with disorders such as ADHD or Asperger’s Syndrome have difficulty reading social cues Cyberspace allows them to ‘connect’ with others and ‘belong’ Cyber bullying Use of technology to torment, threaten, harass, embarrass or humiliate Can be constant, no escape or place of refuge Technology is mobile Role of anonymity in intensifying bullying Feeling of being ‘untouchable’ Predators Lack of supervision in digital world allows for ‘grooming’ from a distance Able to focus on the desires of children Romance Adventure Understanding Sexual information
  • Dangers in a Digital Society How best to protect the youth? Banning/limiting access Usually a ‘knee-jerk’ reaction to an event in the community Offers only narrow protection on school-based networks Does not cover mobile access or educate students Education Allows for good practices to be modelled and mentoring Can be designed specifically for the audience – age, gender, resources Develop coping skills, critical thinking Can include parents and the wider community Supervision Parental monitoring of sites visited and time spent using technology Hardware and network security Teachers use examples/events of misuse as teaching opportunities
  • Inappropriate Use Impact of outside influences Bailey and Ribble have identified that technology abuse has reached epidemic proportions Students exposed to poor role models Attitudes towards technology and consequences Teens more prone to only look at personal consequences See it as easy to ‘justify’ illegal or unethical behaviour Cost Location Behaviour of others
  • Inappropriate Use Ethical and unethical behaviour Behaviour/actions can be hidden from parents Most common behaviours Illegal downloading Cyber bullying Creation of false identity Screen names/identities Can encourage teens to act out fantasies Aggressive Provocative
  • Creation of a Responsible Digital Citizen Roles of parents, students, community Parents Active monitoring of time, sites, behaviour online Needs to be conjunction with school and teachers Require basic knowledge of internet and network security Work towards an improved knowledge Model responsible and ethical behaviour and attitudes Students Be responsible and accept responsibility in their use of the internet and technology Report any negative online experiences Use appropriate privacy settings Develop an awareness of the possible consequences that their behaviour can result in Community Davidson, Martellozzo identify the importance of a police-school partnership Help to create a feeling of comfort for children when dealing with issues
  • Creation of a Responsible Digital Citizen Role of education Educational networks Use to show importance of conducting themselves appropriately Expose students to interactive experiences online Model positive online digital citizenship Digital citizenship needs to become part of the school culture Educate in the day-to-day use of technology Acceptable use policies Built in flexibility to accommodate changing technology Not a list to follow Raise awareness of the importance of having a positive digital footprint Promote involvement in civic life Educating students makes the net a safer place Incorporate critical skills across the curriculum Filtering Choosing Evaluating
  • Rights and Responsibilities Basic human rights are extended into the virtual world Freedom of speech Right to privacy Responsibility Students need to be aware that: This is ethical behaviour What happens online affects others When and when not to use technology Students need to be taught in a way that allows them to make decision and understand the possible consequences Students need to develop the understanding that with the rights and freedoms gained from technology come expectations for their behaviour Can be difficult to define Some online organisations such as Google base their definition around a central value ‘ Do no harm’
  • Questions How do we change the laize faire attitude of many teens and adults towards acceptable and unacceptable online behaviour? Within schools, how do we best protect students from online dangers while still offering them varied and interactive virtual experiences? In a constantly evolving digital landscape, how can the standards of digital citizenship best be monitored?
  • References Bennett, W., Wells, C., &amp; Rank, A. (2009). Young citizens and civic learning: two paradigms of citizenship in the digital age. Citizenship Studies , 13(2), 105-120. doi:10.1080/13621020902731116 Borgia, L. G., &amp; Myers, J. (2010). Cyber Safety and Children&apos;s Literature: A Good Match for Creating Classroom Communities. Illinois Reading Council Journal , 38(3), 29-34. Retrieved from EBSCO host, 16 th March 2011   Brown, M. R. (1999). Make cyber safety a family affair. Black Enterprise , 29(8), 130. Retrieved from EBSCO host, 16 th March 2011. Chisholm, J. F. (2006). Cyberspace Violence against Girls and Adolescent Females. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences , 1087(1), 74-89. doi:10.1196/annals.1385.022 Collier, A. (2009). A Better Safety Net: It&apos;s Time to Get Smart about Online Safety. School Library Journal , 55(11), 36-38. Retrieved from EBSCO host , 16 th March 2011. Coleman, S. (2006). Digital voices and analogue citizenship Bridging the gap between young people and the democratic process. Public Policy Research , 13(4), 257-261. doi:10.1111/j.1070-3535.2006.00451.x Davis, K., Katz, S., Santo, R., &amp; James, C. (2010). Fostering Cross-Generational Dialogues about the Ethics of Online Life. Journal of Media Literacy Education , 2(2), 124-150. Retrieved from EBSCO host, 16 th March 2011 Davidson, J. C., &amp; Martellozzo, E. (2008). Protecting vulnerable young people in cyberspace from sexual abuse: raising awareness and responding globally. Police Practice &amp; Research , 9(4), 277-289. doi:10.1080/15614260802349965 Fantone, L. (2009). Female players from margin to centre: female sociality, digital consumer citizenship and reterritorialisations. Digital Creativity , 20(4), 211-224. doi:10.1080/14626260903290307, p20 Farmer, L. (2010). 21 st Century Standards for Information Literacy, Leadership . 39(4) Retrieved From EBSCO host, 16 th March 2011. Fredrick, K. (2010). Teaching the Rules of the Road Online. School Library Monthly , 26(8), 35-36. Retrieved from EBSCO host , 16 th March 2011 Gardner, W. (2008). Essential survival guide to online safety. Children &amp; Young People Now , 27. Retrieved from EBSCO host , 16 th March 2011. Goddard, C. (2008). Cyber World Bullying. Education Digest , 73(7), 4-9. Retrieved from EBSCO host , 16 th March 2011 Greenhow, C. (2010) New Concept of Citizenship for the Digital Age. Learning and Leading with Technology. 37(6) p24-25. Retrieved from EBSCO host, 16 th March 2011. Janack, J. A. (2006). Mediated Citizenship and Digital Discipline: A Rhetoric of Control in a Campaign Blog1. Social Semiotics , 16(2), 283-301. doi:10.1080/10350330600664862 Lindsay, J., &amp; Davis, V. (2010). Navigate the Digital Rapids. Learning &amp; Leading with Technology , 37(6), 12-15. Retrieved from EBSCO host , 16 th March 2011. Miller, M. J. (2004). Internet Safety Begins at Home. PC Magazine , 23(22), 7-8. Retrieved from EBSCO host , 16 th March 2011 Miller, N. C., Thompson, N. L., &amp; Franza, D. (2009). Proactive Strategies to Safeguard Young Adolescents in the Cyberage. Middle School Journal , 41(1), 28-34. Retrieved from EBSCO host , 16 th March 2011. Miners, Z. (2009). Who&apos;s Keeping Students Safe Online?. District Administration , 45(1), 12. Retrieved from EBSCO host , 16 th March 2011. Ribble, M. (2009). Passport to Digital Citizenship: Journey toward Appropriate Technology Use at School and at Home. Learning &amp; Leading with Technology , 36(4), 14-17. Retrieved from EBSCO host , 16 th March 2011. Ribble, M., Bailey, G.D. CHAPTER 1: The Basics of Digital Citizenship. (2007). Digital Citizenship in Schools (pp. 7-12). International Society for Technology in Education. Retrieved from EBSCO host , 16 th March 2011. Ribble, M., Bailey, G.D. CHAPTER 2: The Nine Elements of Digital Citizenship. (2007). Digital Citizenship in Schools (pp. 13-37). International Society for Technology in Education. Retrieved from EBSCO host , 16 th March 2011. Ribble, M., Bailey, G.D. CHAPTER 6: Foundational Lessons in Digital Citizenship. (2007). Digital Citizenship in Schools (pp. 81-105). International Society for Technology in Education. Retrieved from EBSCO host , 16 th March 2011. Ribble, M. S., Bailey, G. D., &amp; Ross, T. W. (2004). Digital Citizenship: Addressing Appropriate Technology Behavior. Learning &amp; Leading with Technology , 32(1), 6-9,. Retrieved from EBSCO host , 16 th March 2011. Ribble, M. S., &amp; Bailey, G. D. (2004). Monitoring Technology Misuse &amp; Abuse: A Five-Step Plan for Creating a Digital Citizenship Program in Your School. T.H.E. Journal , 32(1), 22. Retrieved from EBSCO host , 16 th March 2011. Roberts, K. J. (2010). Cyber Children: What Parents Need to Know. Exceptional Parent , 40(9), 36-37. Retrieved from EBSCO host , 16 th March 2011. Robertson, M. (2009). Young &amp;quot;Netizens&amp;quot; Creating Public Citizenship in Cyberspace. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education , 18(4), 287-293. Retrieved from EBSCO host , 16 th March 2011. Images Slide 1- Created by genemac110, Retrieved from Flickr, 20 th March 2011 Slide 2 – Created by Kinneidigh Garrett, Retrieved from Flickr, 20 th March 2011 Slide 3- Created by Anthony Gonzalez, Retrieved from www.anthonygonzalez.comsitebuildercontent/sitebui, 20 th March 2011 Slide 4 – Created by evelinachira, Retrieved from Flickr, 20 th March 2011 Slide 5 – Created by Diana Galban, TalkTeens, Retrieved from www,outloud.com/2007/feb2007/images/cyber1.jpg, 20 th March 2011 Slide 6 – Created by banaslug1910, Retrieved from 1225.photobucket.com/albums/dd154/banaslug1910/+ Slide 7 – Created by Kristalyn Bunyan, Retrieved from hilltop.mhc.edu/042604/ProChoiceRally/images/-Ethi Slide 8 – Created by Seb Chan, Retrieved from Flickr, 20 th March 2011 Slide 9 – Created by Education 2020, Retrieved from //education-2020.wikispaces.com/Curriculum, 20 th March 2011 Slide 10 – Created by Mike Wright, Retrieved from www.sunriseseminars.com/Technology/technology.jpg, 20 th March 2011 Slide 11 – Created by krazydad/jbum, Retrieved from Flickr, 20 th March 2011 Slide 12 – Created by Randy Glasbergen, Retrieved from haddadusa.com/Jokes/General/Digital_Age/Pic_01.jpg
  • Typing Never Hurt Anyone: Teaching Responsible Citzenship in the Digital Age

    1. 1. Typing Never Hurt Anyone! Teaching Responsible Citizenship in the Digital Age
    2. 3. <ul><li>Digital Access </li></ul><ul><li>Digital Commerce </li></ul><ul><li>Digital Etiquette </li></ul><ul><li>Digital Communication </li></ul><ul><li>Digital Literacy </li></ul><ul><li>Digital Law </li></ul><ul><li>Digital Security </li></ul><ul><li>Digital Health & Wellness </li></ul><ul><li>Digital Rights & Responsibilities </li></ul>
    3. 4. Dangers in a Digital Society
    4. 6. Inappropriate Use
    5. 8. Creation of a Responsible Digital Citizen
    6. 11. Questions <ul><li>How do we change the laize faire attitude of many teens and adults towards acceptable and unacceptable online behaviour? </li></ul><ul><li>Within schools, how do we best protect students from online dangers while still offering them varied and interactive virtual experiences? </li></ul><ul><li>In a constantly evolving digital landscape, how can the standards of digital citizenship best be monitored? </li></ul>
    7. 12. Recommended Readings <ul><li>Borgia, L. G., Myers, J. (2010) Cyber Safety and Children’s Literature: A Good Match for Creating Classroom Communities. Illinois Reading Council Journal , 38(3), 29-34. Retrieved from EBSCO host, 16 th March 2011. </li></ul><ul><li>Chisholm, J.F. (2006) Cyberspace Violence Against Girls and Adolescent Females. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences , 1087(1), 74-89. doi:10.1196/annals.1385.022 , </li></ul><ul><li>Davidson, J.C., Martellozzo, E. (2008) Protecting Vulnerable Young People in Cyberspace from Sexual Abuse: Raising Awareness and Responsibility Globally. Police Practice & Research 9(4), 277-289. doi:10.1080/15614260802349965 </li></ul><ul><li>Davis, K., Katz, S.J., Santo, R., James, C. (2010)Fostering Cross-Generational Dialogues about the Ethics of Online Life. Journal of Media Literacy Education, 2(2), 124-150. Retrieved from EBSCO host, 16 th March 2011 </li></ul><ul><li>Ribble, M., Bailey, G.D. Chapter 6: Foundation Lessons in Digital Citizenship. (2007) Digital Citizenship in Schools. Pp81-105. International Society for Technology in Education. Retrieved from EBSCO host, 16 th March 2011. </li></ul>

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