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Middlesex University T&L Conference 2012

Middlesex University T&L Conference 2012

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  • Quick overview of our aims
  • 2.05-2.10 onto flip chart or type onto slide2.10-2.15 drawing out main questions – making sure we respond to those during the session
  • Middlesex University has a strong international profile. With over 10,000 students studying on Middlesex programmes across the world, two international campuses and 23 % of our students in the UK coming from overseas, ensuring a global curriculum is vital to us. But in addition, our commitment to the employability of our graduates, wherever in the world they seek employment, means that we have a particular interest in developing appropriate curricula for this purpose. In doing so, we have engaged with the need to tackle issues of the recognition of qualifications across the world, and of finding ways to deal with the sensitive matter of local cultural variations in professions while at the same time pursuing high standards and common outcomes for the learners.In the healthcare field, we have been active in a number of ways in pursuing the task of developing trans-national approaches to education. Much of this work started from encouraging the mobility of staff and students through exchanges. We have a long history of student and staff exchanges. These have been mainly with European countries, encouraged with financial support from the European Union. Not only has the EU funded student and staff mobility, but it has also supported development of the curriculum with particular emphasis on developments that would lead to enhanced mobility of the work force across national borders within the Union. Middlesex University, St Martins, LancasterTromso NorwayRed Cross University College: Stockholm, SwedenSatakunta Polytechnic: Pori, FinlandUniversity of Madrid: Madrid, Spain – then MalagaUniversity of Athens: Athens, GreeceJagiellonian University: Krakow, Poland
  • 2.20In view of new direction, not new, also integral to what we do and a USPDevelop global perspectivesJohn to add in info on current MU outgoing studentsInternational experiences are valued by employers, and we alsoOur outgoing International Student mobility has dropped across the UKIncoming we have many International studentsNeed to look at ways of developing this – The leuven agenda 2020 EHEA Europena Higher Education Association) aims to improve employability, and by 2020 we have an EU target that 20% of graduating students will have undertaken a placement or study period in another country.
  • There is evidence that study abroad and/or work placement brings other benefits to students, including a better degree classification, improved key skill competences, enhanced confidence and potentially also better employment prospects, as employers look favourably on graduates with what is perceived to be added value in relation to potential recruitment. Students studying abroad and the EHEA: Briefing for students’ unions (NUS 2009, p.7): http://resource.nusonline.co.uk/media/resource/studentsabroad.pdf.Look at top 10 UK institutions for outgoing students – Russell Group dominated which speaks for itself – they see the value, and we could maximise upon our excellent reputation for exchange with our many EU partners
  • The European dimension and mobility Mobility is central to the Bologna Process and presents a challenge to UK HEIs. The Leuven Communiqué 2009 declared that “mobility shall be the hallmark of the European Higher Education Area” and agreed that “in 2020 at least twenty per cent of those graduating in the European Higher Education Area should have had a study or training period abroad”. This is known as the Leuven 20/2020 target11.In order to achieve this target it is vital to establish a culture of mobility, in which a study abroad experience and/or a work placement abroad becomes the norm. Successful creation of a mobility culture is necessary in order to counter the tendency towards an inward looking and insular mentality among a substantial proportion of the home student population, in contrast to the increasingly diverse and international context in which their careers may unfold, given the wider trends in the global economy and its impact on the local environment. An essential first step is to promote the benefits of mobility.
  • The European dimension and mobility Mobility is central to the Bologna Process and presents a challenge to UK HEIs. The Leuven Communiqué 2009 declared that “mobility shall be the hallmark of the European Higher Education Area” and agreed that “in 2020 at least twenty per cent of those graduating in the European Higher Education Area should have had a study or training period abroad”. This is known as the Leuven 20/2020 target11.In order to achieve this target it is vital to establish a culture of mobility, in which a study abroad experience and/or a work placement abroad becomes the norm. Successful creation of a mobility culture is necessary in order to counter the tendency towards an inward looking and insular mentality among a substantial proportion of the home student population, in contrast to the increasingly diverse and international context in which their careers may unfold, given the wider trends in the global economy and its impact on the local environment. An essential first step is to promote the benefits of mobility.
  • 20% mobility target for student mobility extended to Doctoral candidates with the merger of the European Research Area with the European Higher Education Area. Increased support for mobility of doctoral candidates and junior researchers will come with the new ERASMUS FOR ALL programme starting in 2014.

Transcript

  • 1. Enhancing our students’ experiences with a student exchange
  • 2. Aims of session:• Recognise the value of incorporating an option for outward mobility into our degree programmes• Advise Middlesex students on how to access the exchange programme• Explore a student’s experience of an overseas exchange
  • 3. Making exchanges part of ouracademic practice…• What do you know about exchange and mobility, and what are the grey areas ?• To what extent do you think promoting exchanges may be part of your academic role ?• How would you develop an exchange/partnership – and are there areas you are considering ?• What would be the advantages for your subject/programme ?
  • 4. Strong history of student and staff mobility: • In 1980’s Middx marketed as “Middlesex, The European Polytechnic” • The then Director, Ray Rickett, was one of the original members of the UK ERASMUS Council. • Across the University opportunities for study abroad on most programmes: 130 partners • Erasmus supported exchange scholarships for students and staff and some curriculum development
  • 5. STUDENT EXCHANGES OVERSEASOur partners abroad No. of No. of Other No. of Erasmus Country institutions Erasmus Country institutions Country institutionsAustria 6 Lithuania 1 Australia 4Belgium 1 Malta 1 Brazil 2Bulgaria 1 The Netherlands 6 Chile 1Cyprus 1 Norway 2 China 2Croatia 1 Poland 2 Dubai 1Czech Republic 3 Portugal 3 Israel 1Denmark 4 Romania 1 Japan 2Estonia 1 Slovak Republic 1 Mauritius 1Finland 8 Slovenia 1 Russia 1France 9 Spain 11 South Korea 1Germany 10 Sweden 5 United States 13Greece 4 Switzerland 1 West Indes 1Hungary 2 Turkey 5Iceland 1Italy 8 TOTAL 100 TOTAL 30
  • 6. Funding• Who goes ?• Is there a ‘profile’ or a demographic of the ‘Erasmus’ student ?
  • 7. Added value…• Employability and benefits of exchange: 65% of international employers indicate that having overseas professional work experience makes graduates more employable. (CIHE 2008)• Exchange a Middlesex USP for our ‘New Direction’ ?• Top 10 UK Institutions for outgoing Student No’s 2010/111. University of Nottingham 6. University of Exeter2. University of Bristol 7. University of Edinburgh3. University of Leeds 8. University of Bath4. University of Manchester 9. University of Warwick5. University of Sheffield 10. UCL
  • 8. YEAR ERASMUS INTERNATIONAL Term Term Full 1 2 Year Total Term 1 Term 2 Full year Total2005-6 6 16 1 23 5 14 1 202006-7 16 20 8 44 6 16 1 232007-8 9 8 11 28 5 13 9 272008-9 13 9 18 40 6 4 22 32 562009-10 7 20 29 (+5*) 9 7 5 21 452010-11 4 7 34 (+1*) 4 16 15 35
  • 9. Challenges• decline in language studies;• cultural inertia, lack of interest in languages (lazy assumption that ‘everyone speaks English’);• absence of institutional strategic commitment, aversion to incurring costs in setting up and managing exchange links, or managing incoming students;• lack of interest at departmental level and inflexible curricula; difficulty matching study abroad to home modules, especially where ‘long thin’ modules are interrupted half way to allow a semester abroad;• student perceptions of added costs;• part-time students with external or family commitments; part-time employed students reluctant to give up jobs;• placements: difficulty in getting students with little or no foreign language skills to pass interviews and gain sufficient foreign language competence;• placement employers’ reluctance to undertake perceived costs, risks and responsibilities.• London specific – nature of London students – home, job, etc
  • 10. Key points (The Leuven Agenda)• Greater stress on employability, learner centred learning, increased student involvement in University governance.• By 2020, all Universities should have achieved the objective of 20% of graduating students having taken part in a placement or study period in another country (does not have to be an EHEA country) as part of their programme in the University.• NB: Students transferring in from another country do not count (even if the programme there is a MU franchised programme). This 20% mobility should be achieved in both first (Bachelor) and second (Master) cycles.
  • 11. A student’s story…
  • 12. Questions ?
  • 13. ReferencesCommission Communication – ‘Erasmus for All’:http://ec.europa.eu/education/erasmus-for-all/doc/com_en.pdfEurope 2020: http://ec.europa.eu/europe2020/index_en.htmHorizon 2020:http://ec.europa.eu/research/horizon2020/index_en.cfm?pg=home&video=noneAgenda for the Modernisation of Europe’s higher education institutions:http://ec.europa.eu/education/higher-education/agenda_en.htmLeuven Communiqué:http://www.ond.vlaanderen.be/hogeronderwijs/bologna/conference/documents/leuven_louvain-la-neuve_communiqu%C3%A9_april_2009.pdfBucharest Communiqué:http://www.ehea.info/Uploads/%281%29/Bucharest%20Communique%202012.pdfMobility strategy for the EHEA:http://www.ehea.info/Uploads/(1)/Mobility_Strategy_DRAFT%20FOR%20ADOPTION.pdfBologna Process Implementation report (2012):http://eacea.ec.europa.eu/education/eurydice/documents/thematic_reports/138EN.pdfStudents studying abroad and the EHEA: Briefing for students’ unions (NUS 2009,p.7): http://resource.nusonline.co.uk/media/resource/studentsabroad.pdf.