Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit

1,417

Published on

Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit

Canada: Accessible Parks Toolkit

Published in: Design, Travel, Technology
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,417
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
61
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit Appendices A-E
  • 2. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 About the Toolkit The Accessible Parks and Trails Toolkit offers an easy-to-follow process for assessing the accessibility of parks and trails. The Toolkit complements the Report on Accessible Parks and Trails in British Columbia that was completed by a diverse group of stakeholders that included parks, park users, disability organizations and others. The Toolkit includes everything necessary to assess all elements of a park and its trails. The purpose of this Guide is to help parks organizations to make better strategic decisions about managing and upgrading accessibility in their parks. The Toolkit includes a step-by-step guide for conducting an assessment, Accessible Parks and Trails Inventory (APTI) spreadsheet, Accessibility Standards and a Glossary of Terms. Start with the Guide and spreadsheet and follow the steps described below. Who is this for? When should it be used? What is being assessed? Assessors and those making After strategic objectives Assets, links, services, strategic decisions have been set and parks to information and business be assessed have been practices determined Page 2
  • 3. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 Appendix A: Step-by-Step Guide for Conducting the Assessments 1. Establish Visitor Use Pattern Step one of the assessment can be completed on a basic park map. The idea is to annotate a basic visitor’s experience and circulation pattern on the park map. A day visit, overnight camper visit or multiple day visit can be included. The map will help to define where to concentrate the park assessment and ensure that the key areas of the park are included in the assessment. Think about how someone would spend the day at the site. They would likely park (at their campsite or at the site of their chosen park activity), go down to the lake for a picnic, go to the playground, use the washroom etc. In the example below from Alice Lake Provincial Park, the diagram shows the key assets of the site circled (thick line) including the accessible campground, washroom, amphitheatre, beach, playground, picnic area, gatehouse and group camping area. The paths linking these assets are also important to assess (shown by dotted arrows). The diagram can also include either different colours or shapes to indicate the importance of the feature. Since there are designated “accessible campsites” in this park (sites 17 and 18), it is helpful to start the assessment from these sites. If there are no designated accessible campsites, start the assessment from key assets in the park (parking or washrooms) to determine where the most convenient accessible campsite could be located. This initial process will help to focus the assessment to efficiently identify site specific assets and paths that will provide the most impact if improved. Step 1- Initial assessment Page 3
  • 4. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 2. Fill in Basic Information Once determining where the assessment will occur within the park, fill in the basic information about the park being assessed. Each park will require its own file and should be labelled with the park name and assessment date (i.e. Alice Lake-2008-06-29.xls). Accessible Parks and Trails Inventory (APTI) Name of Park Region Nearest Community Park Manager Date of Assessment Assessor(s) Page 4
  • 5. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 3. Conduct Inventory To begin the assessment, using the APTI spreadsheet, start by identifying all the key assets and trails that will be assessed based on Step 1. Input these details in the left hand rows (see #3 on Figure below). Assign status levels (how important something is to a park with 0 being critical, 1 being very important, 2 moderately important and 3 not very important) to each asset and trail (see #4 on Figure below). Utilizing the Worksheet templates provided on the tabs at the bottom of the spreadsheet, ensure there is a column to place input for each instance of each asset and trail. If there are multiple washrooms, add a column to the right of the questions to input results. The following is a list of all the assets for which standards have been developed (Appendix D): Common Measures Cabins Garbage/Recycling Clear space Kayak Campsite Fountain/Faucet Cross slope Hook-ups Dock Entrances Pedestal Grill Fishing Pier Hand Controls Firepits/Fireplace Boardwalk Barriers Firewood area Laundry Facilities Hazards Restaurants Knee Clearance Amenities Benches Stairs Parking Rest Stops Ramps Washrooms Playground Surfaces Showers Park Kiosk Signage Signage Picnic Areas Information/reception Picnic Shelter Camping Kitchen Facilities Features Tent Sites Telephone Beach access Drive-in Sites Pay Station Outdoor theaters Viewing Areas Page 5
  • 6. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 4. Assess Assets and Links Using your Step 1 map and inventory list, go into the field and conduct the assessment on the assets and trails. Remember to start from a key asset such as an accessible campsite. Each tab contains pre-defined questions and assessment values based on the answers to the questions in the spreadsheet. Features that are not accessible will get a rating of 0, basic access 1, intermediate access 2, and universal access 3. Place the final ratings in the Summary tab. If, during the process of assessing, additional assets or trails are identified, add a column in the appropriate tab and record the results. These values will be used to assign a final assessment value to that asset. COMMON MEASURES Site A Site B Site C Photo No. Requirements for Basic Access Common Measures 1 Clear space- Is there 760 X 1200 mm clear space to approach an object head on? Easy to operate hand controls- controls operable with one hand (preferably closed fist) without tight grasping or 2 twisting of wrist 3 Operating height- beween 380 mm and 1200 mm No barriers- no objects (natural or built) that reduces path widths to less than 920 mm or no gaps greater than 13 mm 4 wide or threshold greater than 13 mm high, or no gaps greater than 6mm if running parallel to direction of travel 5 No hazards- warnings provided for hazards 6 Surface- firm, stable (could a person ride a narrow tired bicycle without making ruts?) WASHROOM Site A Site B Site C Site D Photo No. Requirements for Basic Access Entrance to Washroom 1 1 Is there at least one accessible path to the washroom? 2 Is the door at least 810 mm wide (760 mm for single occupancy toilet)? 2 3 Are door handles and locks easy to operate ? 3 4 Can the door be opened with a minimal amount of force ? 2 5 Is the doorway free of barriers and a threshold less than 13 mm high? 6 Is there a 1.5 m X 1.5 m clear space in front of door? View the Accessibility Standards Appendix D to see all the standards for all assets and links. As you conduct assessments, estimate the cost of upgrading the asset or trail if possible. The cost of upgrading will vary according to what level of access will be achieved. For an inaccessible asset (access level = 0), an asset could be upgraded to 1 (to basic access), 2 (to intermediate access) or 3 (to universal access levels). Assign values for each level upgrade (1 = maintenance cost; 2 = short-term capital upgrade; and 3 = long-term capital upgrade). For upgrades not possible (i.e. an asset already at intermediate access, there is only 1 upgrade level possible), assign a value of 99 which will highlight that such an upgrade is not applicable. Insert the cost levels onto the spreadsheet (see #8-10 on Figure above). 5. Review and Rethink A key part in terms of these assessments is to provide solutions and alternatives to site situations that are not easily altered to improve accessibility. At Alice Lake, for example, the slopes from the accessible campsite to the main assets of the site, the lake, beach, picnic area, and amphitheatre are too steep for a wheelchair user, and cannot be easily altered. These paths are noted with X’s on the figure below. During the site visit, alternatives should be investigated. Page 6
  • 7. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 Step 5a - Problem links In response to these grade challenges during the assessment it would be helpful to determine if there is another campsite alternative that would work better with grades and the key assets of this park site. At Alice Lake, for example, campsites 77 and 78 provide a good alternative to campsites 17 and 18 for access. These sites are adjacent to an accessible washroom building and are close to the road. The road provides an accessible link to key park assets without steep grades. As a result of this analysis, the assessment should now include sites 77, 78, the washroom building and additional links. Page 7
  • 8. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 5b - Propose Alternatives 6. Assess Trails Similar to the asset/link assessment, a conceptual visitor trail experience map should be identified. Trails that are essential to the experience at the park, including interpretive trails, trails to key viewpoints, popular walks, trails that are not too steep, link to parking etc. should be identified as candidates for assessment. Step 6a- Identify key trails Page 8
  • 9. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 With this initial review map, trail assessments are focussed on key trails. The standards for trails are outlined in Appendix D. Alternative routes for trails may also be identified during the assessment. Trails that are not suitable for upgrades due to difficult slopes, other significant site conditions, extreme cost or environmental or cultural issues should be noted on the review map. Step 6b- Eliminate trails not suitable for upgrades 7. Assess Services, Information and Business Practices Independently, you can assess the services, information and communications and business practices that the park employs. See list below for examples. Recreation Services • Swimming-life guard • Fishing • Boating • Horseback Riding Other Services • Interpretive Services • Outreach/Education Programs • Interpreter Services • Translators • Event Services • Transit to and from park Page 9
  • 10. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 Information • Web • Maps • Publications-marketing • Signage • Wayfinding • Spoken Word • A/V Presentations • Face-to-face communications Business Practices • Training • Hiring • Orientation • Security • Emergency • Policies 8. Analysis After the field assessment is complete, data should be inputted into the APTI Spreadsheet and copies made of any maps or diagrams filed. Analysis will be conducted on assets and trails individually and together to better determine how well connected the accessible park experience is for users. The Summary Tab on the APTI will be used to collect all relevant data used in the analysis. Asset and Trails Analysis Page 10
  • 11. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 Explanation of Columns Asset/Trail Name Unique name of asset (.ie. Lake Washroom, Campground A Washroom, Trail Washroom). For Trails include origin and terminus. Access Level Final access rating for that asset or trail 0 = not accessible 1 = basic 2 = intermediate 3 = universal Status Subjective importance of that asset based on objectives and relative to that park High Status Park Features: accessible campsite, accessible showers, accessible washrooms, key trails, parking, other washrooms, key viewpoints) 0 = critical 1 = high status 2 = moderate status 3 = low status Cost 1, Cost 2, Cost 3 Estimated cost to upgrade an asset or trail 1, 2 or 3 access levels. 1 = within maintenance budget 2 = short-term capital upgrade 3 = long-term capital upgrade 99 = not possible (i.e. if an asset is already universally accessible, it cannot be upgraded) Factor The factor number is a subjective multiplier of the importance of a particular measure. The default values are 2 for access, 5 for status, 5 for upgrade of 1 access level cost (i.e 1 to 2), 3 for an upgrade of 2 access levels (i.e. 1 to 3) and 2 for an upgrade of 3 access levels (i.e. 0 to 3) Totals The totals reflect a sum of scores (i.e. Total 1 = Access Score (Access * Factor) + Status Score (Status * Factor) + Cost 1 Score (Cost 1 * Factor). The totals can be used to rank order accessibility decisions with the lower scores being the most important. A low score reflects “low hanging fruit”. These are assets and trails that have high status, low current access and low cost to upgrade. To highlight this, cells are colour coded (red for most important, yellow for moderately important and green for least important) based on a subjective range. In this case a total score less than 19 was given high importance and a score above 22 a low importance. To efficiently arrive at these conclusions, it is suggested that subjective status levels are assigned prior to field assessment and cost estimates are done after a feature’s access level is determined while still in the field. Page 11
  • 12. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 9. Making Decisions In the end, the assessment will provide data that allows park managers to make more informed decisions as to where their accessibility efforts should be focussed and some estimates on the cost of these decisions. Decisions need to be made relative to the strategic objectives laid out during the strategic planning process. Page 12
  • 13. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 Appendix B: Inventory Spreadsheet - sample pages COMMON MEASURES Site A Site B Site C Photo No. Requirements for Basic Access Common Measures 1 Clear space- Is there 760 X 1200 mm clear space to approach an object head on? Easy to operate hand controls- controls operable with one hand (preferably closed fist) without tight grasping or 2 twisting of wrist 3 Operating height- beween 380 mm and 1200 mm No barriers- no objects (natural or built) that reduces path widths to less than 920 mm or no gaps greater than 13 mm 4 wide or threshold greater than 13 mm high, or no gaps greater than 6mm if running parallel to direction of travel 5 No hazards- warnings provided for hazards 6 Surface- firm, stable (could a person ride a narrow tired bicycle without making ruts?) WASHROOM Site A Site B Site C Site D Photo No. Requirements for Basic Access Entrance to Washroom 1 1 Is there at least one accessible path to the washroom? 2 Is the door at least 810 mm wide (760 mm for single occupancy toilet)? 2 3 Are door handles and locks easy to operate ? 3 4 Can the door be opened with a minimal amount of force ? 2 5 Is the doorway free of barriers and a threshold less than 13 mm high? 6 Is there a 1.5 m X 1.5 m clear space in front of door? Page 13
  • 14. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 Appendix C: Glossary of Terms ADA- Americans with Disabilities Act- is a comprehensive federal civil-rights statute protecting the rights of people with disabilities. It affects access to employment; state and local government programs and services; access to places of public accommodation such as businesses, transportation, and non-profit service providers; and telecommunications Alternate Formats - Individuals with print-based disabilities often benefit from texts available in alternate formats, including digital electronic text, digital audio narration, Braille, large print, or sometimes even combinations of these Assessment Value – level of accessibility determined by the assessment criteria Assets – built and naturally occurring features in a park; also known as a node Business Practices – the underlying policies, procedures and programs that help a park and its resources function Cost – estimated cost for upgrading a park feature which can be an absolute value, if known, or along a relative scale with 0 being no work required, X being the highest cost required and X-Y being a value between the lowest and highest values CSA- Canadian Standards Association (develop standards that address needs, such as enhancing public safety and health) Firm surface- not noticeably distorted or compressed by wheelchair wheels Information – information about the features and services a park has in any and all formats including face-to-face communications Links – the general term for all paths and trails within a park Paths- provide access to elements within a picnic, camping or recreational area where site modifications are intended for visitor convenience and comfort. Paths are mainly for circulation purposes. Priority rating – the subjective value (1 = low 3 = high) given for the importance of an asset to that park; instances of the same asset types might receive different values (i.e. day use washroom might get a 2 priority versus a 3 priority for camp washrooms) Services –activities offered in a park that may or may not include customer service Slip resistant- not slippery under wet or dry conditions Stable surface- not permanently affected by normally occurring weather conditions and able to sustain normal wear and tear between planned maintenance cycles Trails- are usually recreational or scenic routes that may go to viewpoints, or connect to other trails. Page 14
  • 15. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 Appendix D: Accessibility Standards The standards outlined below are a combination of standards/best practices from a variety of sources. Based on the principles of universal design, these standards are intended to maximize accessibility for park users in an efficient and effective manner. The standards explained below set out the minimal values required to reach a specific level. Each higher level requires all the attributes of the level below plus additional values, except where denoted. Because certain measures are duplicated often, they are provided in the Common Measures section. Basic Access Basic access ensures that someone with limited mobility or using a wheelchair can get to and/or inside a facility or feature (including main entrances and public washrooms, if available). Some people may require assistance to access all features (trails, beaches etc.) Intermediate Access Intermediate access builds on basic access by providing safe access throughout facilities and use of amenities for both people with mobility and visual impairments. Trails are negotiable by most wheelchair users. Universal Access Universal access ensures full access to all aspects of a facility or feature, as it relates to the following aspects of ability. • Cognitive/developmental • Partial/Full sight loss • Partial/Full hearing loss • Coordination/Agility (upper or lower extremities) • Finger dexterity • Stamina • Reliance on mobility aids • Extreme of size and weight (Diagrams below adapted from Timesaver Standards for Landscape Architects; Universal Access to Outdoor Recreation: A Design Guide. 1993. PLAE Inc; The Building Access Handbook. Illustrated commentary on Access Requirements in the 1998 BC Building Code. 1998. Crown Publications, British Columbia; Design Guidelines for Accessible Outdoor Recreation Facilities. 1994. Parks Canada; California State Parks Accessibility Guidelines 2005. Accessibility Section. Acquisition and Development Division; US Department of Agriculture Accessibility Guidebook for Outdoor Recreation and Trails. May 2006) Page 15
  • 16. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 Assets Words in italics refer Basic Access Intermediate Access Universal Access to common measures Common Measures Clear Space to • 760 mm X 1200 mm • 760 mm X 1200 mm required in either direction approach object required to approach so wheelchair user can approach object from (Fig. 1) object (trash can, front or side. (min area 1200 mm X 1200 mm) vending machine etc.) Cross Slope • Maximum cross slope 2% (1:50) in any direction (Up to 3% in areas for (Fig. 2) drainage requirements (1:33)) • Max 3% on paths and trails (up to 5% for drainage if necessary) Entrance • Doors and gates must be minimum 810 mm wide (Fig. 3) • Easy to operate door handle (lever style) • Door requires minimal force to open (8lbs max) • Accessible path and no barriers to access door • No threshold over 13 mm high, where over 6mm high should be bevelled at a slope of 1:2 • 1500 mm X 1500 mm space in front of all doors with 600 mm clearance beside • Clear signage indicating accessible entrance if not principal entrance Easy to operate hand • Controls should be operable with one hand (preferably closed fist) without controls tight grasping or twisting the wrist (Fig. 4) • Operating heights 380 mm- 1200 mm Figure 1. Minimum Clear Space Figure 2. Maximum Cross Slope Figure 3. Entrance Figure 4. Easy to operate handles and universal operating height Page 16
  • 17. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 Words in italics refer Basic Access Intermediate Access Universal Access to common measures No barriers • Any object (natural or built) that reduces the path of travel to less than 920 (Fig. 5) mm wide or has a gap over 13 mm wide or threshold greater than 13 mm • No gratings running parallel to travel path unless less than 6 mm apart No hazards • There is adequate • All ground level hazards are protected (Fig. 6,7) warning for hazards • No hazards exist hanging 2000 mm from above (signage) • Objects should not protrude into the path more than 300 mm with a maximum of 680 mm above the ground Knee clearance • Clearance under counters/objects 680 mm high X 760 mm wide X 480 mm (Fig. 8) deep Stairs • Handrails and stair details as per figures (BC • Detectable warning (Fig. 9-11) Building Code) surfaces to warn of • No open risers upcoming stair in • Slip resistant surface urban settings and • Handrail 865-965 mm in height, extends 300 mm high use areas. past top riser and continues one tread depth • If used, should be plus 300 mm parallel to floor past bottom riser used consistently • Handrail continuously graspable along entire throughout site length at least on one side Figure 5. No barrier Figure 6. Protection from overhead hazard Figure 7. Protection from protruding hazards Figure 8. Knee clearance Page 17
  • 18. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 Figure 9. Stair Nosing Figure 10. Handrails and warning strip Page 18
  • 19. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 Words in italics refer Basic Access Intermediate Access Universal Access to common measures Ramps • Maximum 1:12 rise • Handrails required • Edge protection is (Fig. 12) (8.33%) on both sides of provided if drop off • Minimum 920 mm ramp if slope greater is greater than 600 wide than 1:20 mm • Maximum cross slope • Handrails not 2% to ensure required if ramp rise drainage is less than 150 mm • Landings 1500 mm in • Handrails continuous length by width of the full length of the ramp required at ramp, 860-965 mm top, bottom and at above ramp surface changes of direction in ramp, as well as for every 910 mm vertical rise Surface • Firm, stable (Could a person ride a narrow tired bicycle without making ruts?), with an accessible cross slope • Examples of surfaces include finely crushed aggregate, reinforced grass, paving, compacted wood chip surfaces, paving • Stairs, ramps, docks should have slip resistant surfaces Signage • 24 point font with • Alternate formats • Alternate formats at high contrast exist at entrance of entrance of all between foreground key buildings and buildings and and background) amenities amenities • Minimal glare and • Signage should be • Signage uses simple reflection observable from language or symbols seating or standing positions (centre of sign 1170-1575 mm above grade Fig. 27) Figure 11. Railing Figure 12. Ramp detail (max 8.33%) Page 19
  • 20. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 Words in italics refer Basic Access Intermediate Access Universal Access to common measures Camping Tent Sites • At least one • Site connected to • Wheelchair (Fig. 13) accessible site per accessible path accessible tent park • Accessible sites are platforms, if • Accessible surface unmarked and provided, should be • Provide min 1200 mm reserved on request 430-485 mm above clear space around • Within 30m of grade tent pad and other nearest accessible • Variety of locations fixed elements washroom, 60 m of accessible tent • Picnic tables allow within common sites for knee clearance in facilities (water at least one spot etc.) • No barriers or hazards • Within 60 m of accessible washroom Drive-in Sites • 4800 mm wide X 6000 mm long parking space • An accessible RV (5000 min long for cars, 6000 mm long for RVs) with a lift may require a 6000 mm wide parking spot Cabins/Lodging • Accessible entrance • clear space beside • Clear space under • Corridors min 1500 bed the bed 180 mm high mm X 760 mm deep to store mobility aids Kayak Campsite • Tent site with an • A pit toilet should accessible surface be provided closest should be provided as to the tent site as near to the high tide possible along an mark as possible accessible path • A 1500 mm wide • In more developed route of travel sites, an accessible cleared of barriers path should link the (logs, boulders) beach to the should be provided accessible tent site. from the kayak beach site to the accessible tent site Figure 13. Tent site clear space Page 20
  • 21. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 Words in italics refer Basic Access Intermediate Access Universal Access to common measures Hook-ups • Clear space in front of feature • No barriers • Easy to operate hand controls • Accessible surface Pedestal grill • Accessible surface • Cooking surface • Adjacent horizontal (Fig. 14) with 1200 mm clear 750– 900 mm above surface, at grill free draining ground ground with 680 mm height, at least 200 space around ring knee clearance mm wide on which to place hot objects Fire Pits/Fireplace • Accessible surface • 450 - 600 mm high (Fig. 14,15) with 1200 mm clear ring for safety, max free draining ground 600 mm deep space around ring • grate heights on fireplaces 420 – 475 mm above ground • Fire building surface 230 mm from ground Firewood • Wood bins should have a 920 mm clear opening for wheelchair access • No barriers to access wood Figure 14. Pedestal grill and fireplace Figure 15. Fire place/fire pit Page 21
  • 22. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 Words in italics refer Basic Access Intermediate Access Universal Access to common measures Amenities Parking • At least 1 designated accessible spot per 100 • 4.7 m wide spot (Fig. 16) spaces that are 3.7 m wide, 7.5 m deep, required for vans including a 1.2 m wide walkway with lifts • Accessible spots and drop off zones should be • Bus drop off areas located as close as possible to entrance/feature should be connected • Accessible path to connect parking to entrance, to an accessible amenity or feature (no barriers-curb cut path, with a provided) maximum curb • Accessible surface height of 200 mm to • Accessible parking spaces should be clearly allow for the marked with an upright sign(1.5m from ground operation of to bottom of sign) or pavement sign standard lifts Washrooms including • Accessible entrance • Sink has knee • Insulated pipes pit toilets • 1500 X 1500 mm clearance and clear under basin to (Fig. 17) space within stall space prevent leg contact • Stall door opens • Toilet is 400 mm – • Urinal mounted with outward 460 mm high rim max 500 mm • Accessible cross • Grab bar behind above floor with no slope around pit toilet (fig 17a) barriers toilet structure • Clear signage, • Where mirrors are • Easy-to-operate hand Braille, or raised provided, at least controls on faucets, lettering outside one mounted with toilets, stall doors, washroom bottom edge 1000 soap and dispensers mm above the • Grab bar on wall finished floor or is beside toilet tilted to allow for viewing from seated position Figure 16. Parking Layout Figure 17. Washroom layout Page 22 Figure 17a. Grab Bars
  • 23. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 Basic Access Intermediate Access Universal Access Showers • Accessible entrance • Shower head for low • Roll-in shower (indoor/outdoor) to shower stall and rinsing shower (shower chair (Fig. 18,19) building mounted 1220-1350 available) • Slip resistant surface mm, 1830 mm for • Clear space in front standing shower of shower for • Easy to operate hand manoeuvring controls • Chair available to sit • Permanent bench to on while using transfer within reach shower of shower controls • Grab bars mounted 750 mm above ground (bottom edge) along two walls if possible Picnic Areas • Accessible surface • Some picnic tables • All picnic tables (Fig. 20) • Minimum of 1200 mm should be connected accommodate clear space around to an accessible path wheelchairs the picnic table • Accessible tables • No barriers to table situated in variety of pad or picnic shelter picnic settings (some • Knee clearance is in shaded areas) provided to at least • Accessible pedestal one spot at picnic grills adjacent to table accessible tables • Picnic table or picnic • Located 200 m from shelter reached by parking, toilets and accessible path water if possible Figure 19 Outdoor Shower Figure 18. Indoor shower Figure 20 Picnic area Page 23
  • 24. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 Words in italics refer Basic Access Intermediate Access Universal Access to common measures Kitchen Facilities • Accessible entrance • Clear space in front • Knee clearance under • Accessible path of utility sinks counters leading to facility • Easy to operate hand controls Telephone • Located on an • Instructions meet signage standards Pay Stations accessible path • Clear space in front of feature • Easy to operate hand controls • Knee clearance Garbage/Recycling • Receptacles set back 300 mm from paths • Easy to operate hand • Openings less than 1 m high controls (unless bear • Clear space, accessible surface proof receptacles • No barriers required) • Instructions meet signage standards Drinking Water • 750-900 mm from ground to spout outlet Fountain or Water • Accessible surface with clear space in front adjacent to accessible path Faucet • No hazards, barriers (Fig. 21) • Easy to operate hand controls • Knee clearance Figure 21. Water faucet Page 24
  • 25. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 Words in italics refer Basic Access Intermediate Access Universal Access to common measures Dock • Access to the dock • Dock heights within • Dock edges should be (Fig. 22,23) area should be from 450 – 600 mm of the emphasized with a an accessible path water level allow colour contrasting • Accessible ramps easier access to strip that is a • No barriers or boats minimum of 50 mm hazards • If provided, edge wide • Min 1500 mm wide protection 75 mm • Tiered transfer high platforms can be used to access water from dock • Extended rail support is helpful for added stabilization when entering boat Fishing Pier • Accessible surface • In developed sites, • If fish cleaning tables (Fig. 24) • Integrated with a 75 mm high curb provided, a section accessible path edge should be of table should be • A 1200 mm X 1200 provided provided for mm area is required • safety rail of at wheelchair users for one angler. least 800 mm in with knee clearance • 1200 mm space height for seated • Washrooms, parking behind the anglers users and 1070 mm within 200 m if for unrestricted for standing anglers possible pedestrian • Top rail slants circulation towards angler for armrest (Fig 24) • Shade, shelter and seating provided Figure 22. Boat access Figure 23. Example of universal access to water Figure 24. Fishing pier Page 25
  • 26. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 Words in italics refer Basic Access Intermediate Access Universal Access to common measures Boardwalks • No barriers or • Curb edge not less hazards than 75 mm high, if • Accessible surface in provided transition from • Maximum 5% slope path/trails to boardwalks • Min 1500 mm wide Laundry Facilities • Provide clear space • Access to at least one of each type of machine to machine installed for public use • Easy to operate hand controlsl Restaurants • Accessible entrance, path to accessible table • Menus are available • Knee clearance at tables/counters in alternate formats Benches • The height of the • Benches with back support are preferable (Fig. 25) front edge of the • Armrests either in the centre or on one end of seating surface the bench assist people in rising should be between 430-480 mm above grade, with a depth of 500-600 mm Rest Stops • Provided where pedestrians must walk long distances, spacing depends on (Fig. 26) trail difficulty (see trail standards) • Rest areas should be set back 600 mm from the trail or path • Accessible surface to and around bench • Clear space for wheelchair beside bench Figure 25. Accessible bench Figure 26. Rest stop Page 26
  • 27. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 Words in italics refer Basic Access Intermediate Access Universal Access to common measures Playground • CSA standard for fall • Continuous • Follows CSA-Z614 surfacing and accessible path Annex H Guidelines accessibility (ie. no throughout play for Playground pea gravel or sand) area, connecting equipment • Curb cut/ramp into accessible activities • Seating areas play areas and seating provided with clear • Playground • Min 1500 mm wide space beside benches equipment meets path • Shade CSA –Z614 Standards Park Kiosk Signage- • Meets basic signage • Significant grade changes identified on maps Park Map (Fig. 27) requirements • Enough information provided so users can • All restrooms, decide whether to attempt trail (distance, drinking water, trail grade, cross slope, etc.) lengths and elevation • Rest areas and distance between indicated gain marked on map • “you are here” identified • Accessible path to kiosk/sign, Sign within 1800 mm of path edge Information/reception • Accessible section in counter if counter more desk/concession than 2 m long • Counter less than 900 mm above floor with knee clearance • Pens and paper available for communication • Menu in alternative format Figure 27. Park kiosk signage Page 27
  • 28. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 Basic Access Intermediate Access Universal Access Features Beach access • Accessible path to • Accessible path • Access path extends (Fig. 28,29) the sand/water provided to water’s 900 mm beyond the viewing area edge with surfaces water’s edge (high including: flexible tide or average water rubber runners, level in a lake) beach mats, • Path does not exceed boardwalk, snow to a water depth fencing greater than 750 • Surfaces can be mm. Dock access used seasonally acceptable. where severe winter • Dry/level place (1200 conditions prevail X 1200 mm) to park/leave mobility aids adjacent to water’s edge • If beach wheelchairs are provided, signage should be posted to indicate availability Outdoor Theatres • Accessible entrance • Captioning available • Access on to the (Fig. 30) • Accessible path to or alternate stage is barrier free seats communication • Stage edge marked • At least two options upon with colour accessible seating request contrasted strip (900 X 1200 mm) • Provide variety of • At least 600 mm wide spaces with adjacent seating locations, aisles provided for companion seating including seats easier ambulatory • Clear sightlines where wheelchair access without obstructing users can transfer view for others Figure 28. Example of beach matting Figure 29. The pathway/boardwalk should extend 900 mm beyond the water’s edge at high tide (or average water level in a river) Figure 30. Outdoor theatre seating Page 28
  • 29. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 Viewing Areas • Located on an • Guard rails, if • If a telescope or (Fig. 31, 32) accessible path required, are 1070 periscope is • Clear space at mm high max provided, at least viewing area (allows for visibility one must be useable • No barriers or from seated from a seated and hazards position) standing position or • Vertical rails spaced have a moveable arm less than 100 mm with easy to operate apart provide good hand controls visibility through a • Clear signage higher guardrail Figure 31. Visibility at guardrail Figure 32. Viewing scope usable from seated position Page 29
  • 30. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 Links Paths- (Accessible paths ensure universal access connecting main park elements, and must be continuous and free from obstructions. They should be the main path of travel for the general public to the maximum extent feasible) Slope • 5% slope (1:20) or less, unlimited distance (max slope 5% on boardwalk) • From 5.1% to 8.3% (1:12) for maximum distance of 15 m • From 8.34% for maximum distance of 9 m • No slopes greater than 10% permitted Cross Slope • Cross slope not to exceed 3% (5% maximum if necessary for proper drainage) Surface • Firm, stable Resting areas • Provided every 15 m for slopes between 1:20 and 1:12, every 9 m for (Fig. 33) slopes between 1:12 and 1:10 • 1500 m in length by width of path • Distances may be increased between areas depending on site conditions Width • Minimum 920 mm (1500 m minimum for boardwalk) (Fig. 34) • Width can be reduced to 810 mm for a distance of 600 mm maximum • Where route less than 920 mm, passing spaces 1500 X 1500 mm should be provided every 60-90 m. • A t intersection in a path can also be used as a passing space Barriers/Hazards • No hazards or barriers (See Common Measures) Edge protection • If provided, should have a height of 75 mm (used at least on one side if (Fig. 35) drop from path is greater than 75 mm) • If drop from trail exceeds 600 mm, a railing should be provided Figure 33. Resting areas along path Figure 34. Passing spaces along narrow trail Figure 35. Edge protection with a 500 mm min shoulder cleared of vegetation. Page 30
  • 31. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 Trails- (Trails are usually recreational or scenic routes that may go to viewpoints, other trails, or are simply circle routes. Trails enhance the visitors’ experience of natural and cultural features of a site allowing a varied levels of access). Based on Kananaskis Standards, Alberta. Universal Intermediate Access Basic Access Class (for all users) (for most users) (for some users) Length of Trail- (accessibility 0-3 km 1-5 km 3+ km also depends on terrain, endurance level of individual) Width 1.2-1.5 mm 1.2-1.5 mm <920 mm • Same as path Surface • Paved (asphalt, • Compacted • Packed dirt concrete) crushed • Compacted wood • Boardwalk aggregate chips (small gauge, • Compacted • Reinforced grass well compacted) crushed • Surface firm in all • Crushed gravel aggregate (6 mm weather (1/4”) • Surface firm in all weather Max grade (running slope) 1:16 (6%) 1:10 (10%) 1:8 (12%) Max grade X length before 1:16 for 15 m 1:16 for 50 m 1:16 for 100 m resting area required 1:10 for 4 m 1:10 for 20 m (Fig. 36,37) 1:8 for 8 m Figure 36. Measuring grade with a hand level Figure 37. Measuring grade with a digital level. A detailed universal trail assessment process that uses a clinometer and digital inclinometer to measure grade and cross slope has been developed by Beneficial Designs (a US based firm) www.beneficialdesigns.com Page 31
  • 32. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 Universal Intermediate Access Basic Access Class (for all users) (for most users) (for some users) Shoulder No drops Minimal drops variable Cross slope 2% max 3% max 3.0% max Use frequency (ie. demand for Med-heavy Medium Light-med use of a particular trail)) Trail access Paved parking Paved parking, other From roadway trail Rest stop/benches 1 per 200m 1 per 400 m optional Edge condition • 75 mm curb • 75 mm curb at • 75 mm curb at provided where difficult or difficult or the vertical drop hazardous hazardous locations from the trail locations exceeds 75 mm • Curb also offers “shoreline” for visually impaired users Barriers • No barriers • No barriers • May find some obstacles Feature • A trail that goes past a prominent feature should provide basic access at least to the feature unless there is a significant environmental barrier Page 32
  • 33. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 Services, Information and Communications and Business Practices Basic Access Intermediate Access Universal Access Services Recreation • All recreational • Adapted equipment • Adapted equipment activities made is is available for rent available to people with permitted/available for appropriate disabilities for use with activities activities Programs • All programs made available to people with disabilities Event Services • all events made • Programs take into consideration of the needs available to people with of people with disabilities disabilities Transit Services • If transit services are • Accessible transit services are available to and available, drop-off and from the park pick-up areas are accessible Information Web • Website is W3C Compliant • Information about park-specific accessibility is provided Maps • Maps show accessibility • Maps are available features in large font versions Publications • Publications are available in large (14) point font Signs • Map readability- 24 • Signs should be • Graphic information point type size, sans setback 450-600 mm is accessible to all serif from pathways including those with • Signage should be • The international mobility, learning observable from seating symbol of and visual or standing positions accessibility should impairments. (centre of sign 1170- be displayed at • Raised or routed 1575 mm above grade accessible parking letters are helpful for wall mounted sign) spaces, loading for visually impaired, zones, accessible as are raised relief restrooms, and maps accessible site and • Where possible, facility entrances signage that are not the complemented by primary entrance informational brochures can provide more detailed information Page 33
  • 34. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 Basic Access Intermediate Access Universal Access Wayfinding • Warning signs directing people away from barriers and hazards • Includes simple graphics, landmarks, and colour to enhance orientation • Symbols and diagrams are preferred over text Audio-Visual • Alternate audio and visual formats should be provided when audio or visual services are provided Face-to-Face • Disability sensitive • Awareness of disability specific needs should be (Customer Service) communications should applied when providing park information always be used Business Practices Recruitment & • People with disabilities are actively recruited Hiring Orientation & • Staff training includes • Staff orientation and communications include Training general disability park-specific accessibility awareness awareness training Emergency • Emergency procedures consider people with disabilities and are embedded Procedures into regular training Universal Design • Principles of universal design are considered for all developments • Feedback from park users is actively sought Page 34
  • 35. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 Appendix E: References and Links The references listed below provide sources for sources/references for more detailed accessibility information. Web links provided are good sources for the most up to date access information. • Annex H CAN/CSA-Z614 Children’s Playspaces and Equipment Standards. • Barrier Free Guidelines Design Manual Vol 3. 1996. Ontario Parks. • Boulder Area Accessible Trails and Natural Sites. 2006. Boulder Parks and Recreation Expand Program. • California State Parks Accessibility Guidelines 2005. Accessibility Section. Acquisition and Development Division. • Design Guidelines for Accessible Outdoor Recreation Facilities. 1994. Parks Canada. • Designing Sidewalks and Trails for Access. 1999. US Department of Transportation. • Guidelines for Accessibility in Outdoor Spaces. 2003. City of Kelowna. • Kananaccess. Barrier Free Design for Trails, Pathways and Facilities in Kananaskis Country. 1990. Alberta. • National Centre on Accessibility. www.ncaonline.org • Recommendations for Accessibility Guidelines: Recreation Facilities and Outdoor Developed Areas. 1994. US Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. • The Accessibility Checklist. An Evaluation System for Buildings and Outdoor Settings. Users Guide, Survey Forms. Second Edition. 1993. Mig Communications. • The Building Access Handbook. Illustrated commentary on Access Requirements in the 1998 BC Building Code. 1998. Crown Publications, British Columbia http://www.housing.gov.bc.ca/building/handbook/index.htm • Timesaver Standards for Landscape Architects • Universal Access Standards. 2004. Capital Regional District. • Universal Access to Outdoor Recreation: A Design Guide. 1993. PLAE, Inc. • US Department of Agriculture Accessibility Guidebook for Outdoor Recreation and Trails. May 2006. www.fs.fed.us/recreation/programs/accessibility/ • US Forest Service Outdoor Recreation Accessibility Guidelines. FSORAG. May 22, 2006. Page 35
  • 36. Accessible Parks and Trails Assessment Toolkit 2008 Additional Standards Reach (persons in wheelchairs, canes, standing) BC Building Code Eye level for wheelchair user is between 1100 and 1300 mm from the ground. Page 36

×