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Project Based Learning
Project Based Learning
Project Based Learning
Project Based Learning
Project Based Learning
Project Based Learning
Project Based Learning
Project Based Learning
Project Based Learning
Project Based Learning
Project Based Learning
Project Based Learning
Project Based Learning
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Project Based Learning

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EDUC6751 Lecture 5

EDUC6751 Lecture 5

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  • 1. EDUC6751 Knowledge and Communication Technologies
  • 2. The Design Process and Project Based Pedagogies LECTURE FIVE Robert J Parkes, PhD
  • 3. What is Project Based Learning? <ul><li>Project learning is a dynamic approach to teaching in which students explore real-world problems and challenges. </li></ul><ul><li>Project based learning is organized around a ‘rich task’ or a series of projects. </li></ul>
  • 4. Defining Features of PBL <ul><li>PBL projects should be complex tasks, based on challenging questions or problems, that involve students in design, problem-solving, decision making, or investigative activities; </li></ul><ul><li>Give students the opportunity to work relatively autonomously over extended periods of time; & </li></ul><ul><li>Culminate in realistic products or presentations. </li></ul>
  • 5. According to the research literature, a well-crafted PBL project must: <ul><li>Engage and build on student interests and passions </li></ul><ul><li>Provide a meaningful and authentic context for learning </li></ul><ul><li>Immerse students in complex, real-world problems that don’t have a predetermined solution </li></ul><ul><li>Allow students to take the lead, making critical choices and decisions </li></ul><ul><li>Require students to develop and demonstrate essential skills and knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Draw on multiple disciplines to solve problems and deepen understanding </li></ul><ul><li>Build in opportunities for reflection and self-assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Result in useful products that demonstrate what students have learned </li></ul><ul><li>Culminate in exhibitions or presentations to an authentic (public, peer & expert) audience </li></ul>
  • 6. Benefits of PBL <ul><li>With this type of active and engaged learning, students are inspired to obtain a deeper knowledge of the subjects they're studying. </li></ul><ul><li>Overcomes the dichotomy between knowledge and thinking, helping students to both &quot;know&quot; and &quot;do.&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>Supports students in learning and practicing skills in problem solving, communication, and self-management. </li></ul><ul><li>Encourages the development of habits of mind associated with lifelong learning, civic responsibility, and personal or career success. </li></ul><ul><li>Integrates curriculum areas, thematic instruction, and community issues. </li></ul><ul><li>Assesses performance on content and skills using criteria similar to those in the work world, thus encouraging accountability, goal setting, and improved performance. </li></ul><ul><li>Creates positive communication and collaborative relationships among diverse groups of students. </li></ul><ul><li>Meets the needs of learners with varying skill levels and learning styles. </li></ul><ul><li>Engages and motivates bored or indifferent students. </li></ul>
  • 7. PBL Video Interlude <ul><li>http://educ6751.ning.com/page/lecture-5 </li></ul>
  • 8. Designing a Project <ul><li>PBL projects are central, not peripheral to the curriculum . </li></ul><ul><li>PBL projects are focused on compelling questions or ill-defined problems that “drive” students to encounter (and struggle with) the central concepts and principles of a discipline </li></ul><ul><li>PBL projects involve students in a constructive investigation </li></ul><ul><li>PBL projects are student-driven to a significant degree </li></ul><ul><li>PBL projects are realistic rather than rarefied. </li></ul>
  • 9. Practical Interlude <ul><li>Design a PBL project of your own using the five principles </li></ul>
  • 10. The Design Process: Structuring the Project <ul><li>DESIGN Phase [Pre-production] </li></ul><ul><li>MAKE Phase [Production & Post-Production] </li></ul><ul><li>EVALUATE Phase [Distribution] </li></ul>
  • 11. The Role of the Teacher <ul><li>The Guide on the Side </li></ul><ul><li> vs </li></ul><ul><li>The Sage on the Stage </li></ul>
  • 12. Important Tips <ul><li>20% Overrun Buffer </li></ul><ul><li>Frequent Checkpoints </li></ul><ul><li>Involve students in project and rubric design </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid making decisions for students </li></ul><ul><li>Teachable Moments </li></ul><ul><li>Use examples of professional work </li></ul><ul><li>Just-in Time Instruction </li></ul><ul><li>Make sure technology is crucial or don’t use it </li></ul>
  • 13. What’s On Next? <ul><li>Coming Up: Multiliteracies as Pedagogy </li></ul><ul><li>Thomas, JW 2000, A review of research on project-based learning. California: The Autodesk Foundation. [Available online]: http:// www.bie.org/tmp/research/researchreviewPBL.pdf </li></ul>

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