Teaching Through                Projects                   Professor:           Sergio Meza Padilla, M.Ed.                ...
“Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember.Involve me and I learn”.Benjamin Franklin
AgendaWorkshop 1 (August 6th/2012)Teaching through Projects1.What is project-based instruction (PBI)?2.Why is PBI importan...
Project-based learningKeeping children engaged and motivated in school is challenging,even for the most experienced teache...
Project-based learningUsing projects is certainly not a new concept; teachers often incorporateprojects into their lesson ...
1. What is project-based                      instruction (PBI)?Project-based instruction is an authentic instructional mo...
1. What is project-based                       instruction (PBI)?Constructivism views learning as the result of mental con...
2. Why is PBI important?PBI helps Ss develop skills for living in a knowledge-based andhighly technological society.IMPORT...
3. Benefits of PBIPBI provides one way to introduce a wider range of learningopportunities into the classroom. It can enga...
3. Benefits of PBI• Increasing motivation. teachers often note improvement in class  participation, and greater willingnes...
3. Benefits of PBI• Increasing social and communication skills.• Increasing problem-solving skills.• Providing opportuniti...
4. Elements of an authentic                      projectThere are a wide range of project types—service learning projects,...
4. Elements of an authentic                   project•   A tangible product that can be shared with an audience.•   Connec...
5. Implementing PBIEssentials for structuring projects effectively:Projects come from different sources and develop in dif...
5. Implementing PBI5.1. Situation or problem: a sentence or two describing the issue orproblem that the project is trying ...
5. Implementing PBIIdentify Learning Goals and/or ObjectivesBefore the project is started, teachers should identify the sp...
5. Implementing PBIBe specific in determining outcomes so the Ss understand exactly what isto be learned.Other things that...
6. Assessment of project                     workAssessing student performance on project work is quite different fromasse...
6. Assessment of project                      workSelecting Assessment Tasks: select tasks that require students todemonst...
7. ConclusionPlanning and implementing effective projects can be challenging at first,but if teachers are given time to pl...
Thank you
Project-Based Instruction
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Project-Based Instruction

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Project-based learning (PBL) is a unique approach to learning that provides pupils with the opportunity to experience working collaboratively. It also helps students use critical thinking skills to solve real-world problems. This presentation aims at demonstrating how projects can help EFL students improve their language skills by developing a series of outside-the-classroom assignments designed to reach a desire collaborative environment where students can interweave speaking, reading, listening and writing in a fun but constructive manner. By working together students can also recycle, review and retain new information given in class.

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Project-Based Instruction

  1. 1. Teaching Through Projects Professor: Sergio Meza Padilla, M.Ed. August 0f 2012¡Formamos profesionales bilingües con Responsabilidad Social!
  2. 2. “Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember.Involve me and I learn”.Benjamin Franklin
  3. 3. AgendaWorkshop 1 (August 6th/2012)Teaching through Projects1.What is project-based instruction (PBI)?2.Why is PBI important?3.Benefits of PBI4.Elements of an authentic project5.Implementing PBI6.Assessment of project work7.Conclusion
  4. 4. Project-based learningKeeping children engaged and motivated in school is challenging,even for the most experienced teachers.Although it is difficult to prescribe a “one-size-fits-all” approach,research shows that there are practices that will generallyencourage students to be more engaged.These practices include moving away from rote learning andmemorization to providing more challenging, complex work; havingan interdisciplinary focus, rather than a departmentalized one; andencouraging cooperative learning.
  5. 5. Project-based learningUsing projects is certainly not a new concept; teachers often incorporateprojects into their lesson plans. Project-based instruction is different: Itis a holistic instructional strategy rather than an add-on.This approach is becoming more meaningful because teachersincreasingly teach groups of children who have different learning styles,cultural and ethnic backgrounds, and ability levels.PBI builds on children’s individual strengths, and allows them to exploretheir interests.
  6. 6. 1. What is project-based instruction (PBI)?Project-based instruction is an authentic instructional model orstrategy in which students plan, implement, and evaluate projectsthat have real-world applications beyond the classroom.Learning activities that are interdisciplinary, long term, and student-centered are emphasized in PBI.Project- based instructional strategies have their roots in theconstructivist approach evolved from the work of psychologists andeducators such as Lev Vygotsky, Jerome Bruner, Jean Piaget and JohnDewey.
  7. 7. 1. What is project-based instruction (PBI)?Constructivism views learning as the result of mental construction; thatis, children learn by constructing new ideas or concepts based ontheir current and previous knowledge.Ss find projects fun, motivating, and challenging because they play anactive role in the entire planning process.
  8. 8. 2. Why is PBI important?PBI helps Ss develop skills for living in a knowledge-based andhighly technological society.IMPORTANT FACT: the old-school model of passively learning facts andreciting them out of context is no longer sufficient to prepare Ss tosurvive in today’s world.Solving highly complex problems requires Ss to have bothfundamental skills and digital age skills. With this combination ofskills, Ss become directors and managers of their learning.
  9. 9. 3. Benefits of PBIPBI provides one way to introduce a wider range of learningopportunities into the classroom. It can engage Ss from diverse culturalbackgrounds because they can choose topics that are related to theirown experiences, and use cultural or individual learning styles as well.IMPORTANT FACT: incorporating projects into the curriculum is neithernew nor revolutionary.Benefits of project-based instruction include:•Preparing children for the workplace. Ss are exposed to a widerange of skills and competencies such as collaboration, project planning,decision making, and time management.
  10. 10. 3. Benefits of PBI• Increasing motivation. teachers often note improvement in class participation, and greater willingness to do class and home work.• Connecting learning at school with reality. Ss retain more knowledge and skills when they are engaged in stimulating projects. With projects, Ss use higher order thinking skills rather than memorizing facts in an isolated context without a connection to how and where they are used in the real world.• Providing collaborative opportunities to construct knowledge. Collaborative learning allows Ss to share their ideas, own opinions, and negotiate solutions, skills that will be necessary in the workplace.
  11. 11. 3. Benefits of PBI• Increasing social and communication skills.• Increasing problem-solving skills.• Providing opportunities to contribute to their school or community.• Increasing self-esteem. Ss take pride in accomplishing something that has value outside the classroom.• Allowing Ss to use their individual learning strengths and diverse approaches to learning.
  12. 12. 4. Elements of an authentic projectThere are a wide range of project types—service learning projects, work-basedprojects, and so forth, but authentic projects all have in common these definingfeatures.•Student-centered, student-directed.•A beginning, middle, and end.•Content meaningful to Ss.•Real-world problems.•Firsthand investigation.•Specific goals related to curriculum and school, district, or statestandards.
  13. 13. 4. Elements of an authentic project• A tangible product that can be shared with an audience.• Connections among academic, life, and work skills.• Opportunity for feedback and assessments from expert sources.• Opportunity for reflective thinking and student self-assessment.• Authentic assessments.
  14. 14. 5. Implementing PBIEssentials for structuring projects effectively:Projects come from different sources and develop in different ways.There is no one correct way to implement a project, but there aresome questions and things to consider when designing effectiveprojects.Outlining Project GoalsIt is very important to clear goals so that the project is planned andcompleted effectively. Teacher and Ss should develop an outline thatexplains the project’s essential elements and expectations for eachproject.
  15. 15. 5. Implementing PBI5.1. Situation or problem: a sentence or two describing the issue orproblem that the project is trying to address.5.2. Project description and purpose: a concise explanation of theproject’s ultimate purpose and how it addresses the situation or problem.5.3. Performance specifications: a criteria or standards the projectmust meet.5.4. List of project participants with roles assigned: include projectteammates, school staff members, and the like.5.5. Assessment: how the student’s performance will be evaluated. InPBI, the learning process and the final product are both evaluated.
  16. 16. 5. Implementing PBIIdentify Learning Goals and/or ObjectivesBefore the project is started, teachers should identify the specific skillsor concepts that the student will learn, form clear academic goals, andmap out how the goals tie into school, state, and/or nationalstandards.Here are five questions to consider when determining learning goals:•What important cognitive skills do I want my students to develop?•What social and affective skills do I want my students to develop?•What metacognitive skills do I want my students to develop?•What types of problems do I want my students to be able to solve?•What concepts and principles do I want my students to be able to apply?
  17. 17. 5. Implementing PBIBe specific in determining outcomes so the Ss understand exactly what isto be learned.Other things that teachers need to consider are as follows:Do the Ss have easy access to the resources they need? Thisis especially important if a student is using specific technology or subject-matter expertise from the community.Do the Ss know how to use the resources? Ss who have minimalexperience with computers, for example, may need extra assistance inusing them.Are Ss clear on the roles and responsibilities of each person in hisgroup?
  18. 18. 6. Assessment of project workAssessing student performance on project work is quite different fromassessing traditional classwork.Purpose of the AssessmentBefore determining what assessment strategies would work best, theteacher needs to determine what the purpose of the assessment is.Achievement: focus on outcomes of student learning to monitorprogress and determine grades.Diagnosis and Improvement: focus on process and look at studentstrengths and weaknesses to identify appropriate programs andstudents’ learning strategies.
  19. 19. 6. Assessment of project workSelecting Assessment Tasks: select tasks that require students todemonstrate specific skills and knowledge.Student Self-Assessment: because PBI is student driven, assessmentshould be student driven as well. Ss can keep journals and logs tocontinually assess their progress. A final reflective essay or log can allowSs and teachers to understand thinking processes, reasoning behinddecisions, ability to arrive at conclusions and communicate what theyhave learned.
  20. 20. 7. ConclusionPlanning and implementing effective projects can be challenging at first,but if teachers are given time to plan, and are supported by theiradministrators, they can make education come alive for their Ss andencourage them to take initiative for their own learning.
  21. 21. Thank you

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