Comparatives

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Comparatives

  1. 1. Comparatives and Superlatives
  2. 2. Adjective form <ul><li>Only one syllable, ending in E. Examples: wide, fine, cute </li></ul><ul><li>Comparative </li></ul><ul><li>Add -R: wider, finer, cuter </li></ul><ul><li>Superlative </li></ul><ul><li>Add -ST: widest, finest, cutest </li></ul>
  3. 3. Adjective form <ul><li>Only one syllable, with one vowel and one consonant at the end. Examples: hot, big, fat </li></ul><ul><li>Comparative : Double the consonant, and add -ER : hotter, bigger, fatter </li></ul><ul><li>Superlative : Double the consonant, and add -EST : hottest, biggest, fattest </li></ul>
  4. 4. Adjective form <ul><li>Only one syllable, with more than one vowel or more than one consonant at the end. Examples: light, neat, fast Comparatives </li></ul><ul><li>Add -ER: lighter, neater, faster </li></ul><ul><li>Superlatives </li></ul><ul><li>Add -EST : lightest, neatest, fastest </li></ul>
  5. 5. Adjective form <ul><li>Two syllables, ending in Y. Examples: happy, silly, lonely Change Y to I, then add </li></ul><ul><li>Comparative: </li></ul><ul><li>-ER: happier, sillier, lonelier </li></ul><ul><li>Superlative : </li></ul><ul><li>-EST: happiest, silliest, loneliest </li></ul>
  6. 6. Adjective form <ul><li>Two syllables or more, not ending in Y. Examples: modern, interesting, beautiful </li></ul><ul><li>Use MORE before the adjective: more modern, more interesting, more beautiful </li></ul><ul><li>Use THE MOST before the adjective: most modern, most interesting, most beautiful. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Comparatives <ul><li>Comparatives are used to compare two things. You can use sentences with THAN, or you can use a conjunction like BUT. Examples: </li></ul><ul><li>Jiro is taller than Yukio. </li></ul><ul><li>Yukio is tall, but Jiro is taller. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Superlatives <ul><li>Superlatives are used to compare more than two things. Superlative sentences usually use THE, because there is only one superlative. Examples: </li></ul><ul><li>Masami is the tallest in the class. </li></ul><ul><li>Yukio is tall, and Jiro is taller, but Masami is the tall est . </li></ul>
  9. 9. Irregular : comparatives/superlatives <ul><li>good-better-the best </li></ul><ul><li>well-better-the best </li></ul><ul><li>bad-worse-the worst </li></ul><ul><li>far-further-the furthest </li></ul><ul><li>little – less-the least </li></ul>
  10. 10. Adverbs vs adjectives: <ul><li>more slowly/ slower </li></ul><ul><li>more quickly / quicker </li></ul>
  11. 11. The more...the more... <ul><li>The more he does it the more I like it </li></ul><ul><li>The more difficult it seems the harder you must try </li></ul><ul><li>The more the better </li></ul><ul><li>The more the merrier </li></ul>
  12. 12. Comparisons of equality <ul><li>When two things that are the same are compared … the pattern used is: as + adjective + as or as + adverb + as . </li></ul><ul><li>George isn't as patient as Kevin. </li></ul><ul><li>My mother drives as carefully as my father. </li></ul>
  13. 13. More examples <ul><li>George is two years older than Kevin. </li></ul><ul><li>George is happier than Kevin. </li></ul><ul><li>Alice is a sweeter person than Marilyn. </li></ul>
  14. 14. More examples <ul><li>George is more impatient than Kevin. </li></ul><ul><li>Alice is a more patient person than Marilyn. </li></ul><ul><li>Kevin speaks more slowly than George. </li></ul>

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