Using PMCDF to      Advance Ones CareerPresented by: George Jucan, MSc PMP MPM  Core Team member for PMCDF Second Edition ...
PMI StandardsProjects• A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide)- Fourth Edition• Practice Standa...
Alignment with PMI Standards                                     PMBOK® Guide                                      Third E...
PMCDF - Second EditionVision:We provide the basis forindividuals and organizationsto raise their competence inProject Mana...
Target Audience•   Project Managers•   Managers of project managers•   Members of a Project Management Office•   Managers ...
PMCDF Overview• Provide support to individuals and organizations• Provide guidance for the assessment of Project  Managers...
Project Management    Competence
What is “Competence”?• Merriam-Webster : The quality or state of […] having requisite  or adequate ability or qualities.• ...
PMCDF DefinitionsProject management competence is the demonstratedability to perform activities within a project environme...
Dimensions of PM Competence• Knowledge - what the project manager knows about the  application of processes, tools and tec...
Knowledge Competence• What a person knows about project management  discipline and how projects should be planned,  execut...
PMCDF Competencies                     12
Performance Competence
Performance Competence• What is the person able to do by applying their project  management knowledge• Project manager’s p...
Structure                         5 Units                       34 Elements               131 Competence CriteriaOne to on...
AlignmentUnits: Defined by PMP Examination Specification(Performance Domains)Elements: Aligned with the PMP Examination Sp...
Units of Performance CompetenceInitiating: authorize and define the scope of a new project.Planning: define and mature the...
Performance Competence Elements                                                                                 Monitoring...
Criteria and Evidences                                   Element        High level risks, assumptions and constraints are ...
Personal Competence
Personal Competence• Personal Competencies are those behaviors, attitudes  and core personality characteristics that contr...
Structure                          6 Units                       30 Elements                134 Competence CriteriaOne to ...
AlignmentUnits: Derived from 2003 PMCDF, Code of Ethics andProfessional Conduct and PMP Examination SpecificationElements:...
Units of Personal CompetenceCommunicating: Effectively exchanges accurate, appropriate andrelevant information with stakeh...
Personal Competence Elements                               25
Criteria and Evidences                            Element      Actively listens, understands and responds to stakeholders ...
Developing Competence As A Project Manager
PMCDF Competencies
Supporting Competencies• PMI Standards are “applicable to most projects most of  the time”, so they must be generic• PM al...
Competence Development Process                                 30
Competence Assessment• Performed by the individual or by the organization (e.g.  by PMO or management)• Based on evidences...
Assessment Rigor• Low Rigor – typically involves casual self-assessment,  or informal assessment against the competence cr...
Assessment Example                    Personal Competencies                               ScoreCommunicating              ...
Assessment Example              Personal Competencies                       Score     Communicating                       ...
Assessment Example   Element 6.1:              Actively listens, understands, and responds to stakeholders  Performance Cr...
Development Plan• Individual strengths and areas to be addressed• Prioritized development areas• Using different methods: ...
Development Plan Example                           37
Execute PlanThe project manager needs to execute this plan just asa project manager would execute any project plan.• Plan ...
Development Plan Example                           39
Evaluate Plan• Iterative process to develop competence as a  project manager• Each iteration of the Competence Development...
Evaluate PlanQuestions that need to be asked include:  – Was the plan suitable?  – Did the plan deliver the outcomes neede...
A Guide to the Top
Career Path                                                                       E x e c u tiv e   P M O M anager        ...
Project Assistant         Performs routine tasks like updating the schedule, monitoring people’s availability,        cent...
Project Coordinator Without extensive experience and usually without formal project management training, aproject coordina...
Project Leader A technical expert that might have no formal project management training, able to delivergood products but ...
Project ControllerWith formal training in project management and/or specific areas (mostly scheduling, cost and risks) per...
Junior Project ManagerTypically having formal project management training but not extensive experience, a junior  project ...
Project Manager  Even if "all scope, in time and within budget" target remains sometimes out of reach, aproject manager ha...
Senior Project Manager Manage complex projects based on sound methodological knowledge as well as advanced people skills, ...
Project DirectorCoordinates a number of projects (and their corresponding project managers), usually acting  on behalf of ...
SME Project Manager Typically part of a PMO, has advanced overall project management knowledge (PMP) anddemonstrated exper...
PMO ManagerCombining organizational and project management knowledge the PMO Manager ensuresdevelopment, application and a...
Program Manager  As typically considered still a tactical role it requires solid project/program management  knowledge, bu...
Portfolio ManagerMostly concerned with business performance analysis, authorizing or not projects initiationor continuance...
Summary
The Framework• The PMCD Framework defines the Performance and  Personal Competencies required for a competent  project man...
The Process• Identify the target and specific competencies  required for that position.• Assess current level of competenc...
Career Path                                                                       E x e c u tiv e   P M O M anager        ...
Questions?               George Jucan      gjucan@opendatasys.com                               60
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George Jucan: Using PMCDF to Advance One's Career

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George Jucan

George Jucan is a well known in the project management community as a successful IT project management consultant, speaker at public events, trainer and author of high-impact project management articles.

George is an experienced Project Manager Professional (PMP) with 20 years of technical and management experience in complex environments, both in public and private sector. He provides consulting services in methodology definition and capability assessment, business reengineering and organizational restructuring, projects audit and recovery, as well as hands-on management of projects.

George Jucan is currently a member of the Core Team for the upcoming PMBOK® Guide 5th Edition.
Moreover, George is currently the Vice-Chair of the Canadian Advisory Committee for the upcoming ISO 21500 project management standard. He is also the Chair of PMI Information Systems SIG, as well as a Board member of PMI Southern Ontario Chapter.

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George Jucan: Using PMCDF to Advance One's Career

  1. 1. Using PMCDF to Advance Ones CareerPresented by: George Jucan, MSc PMP MPM Core Team member for PMCDF Second Edition South Western Ontario Chapter - Symposium 2011 Project Management: A Global Perspective
  2. 2. PMI StandardsProjects• A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide)- Fourth Edition• Practice Standard for Project Risk Management• Construction Extension to the PMBOK® Guide Third Edition• Government Extension to the PMBOK® Guide Third Edition• Practice Standard for Earned Value Management• Practice Standard for Project Configuration Management• Practice Standard for Work Breakdown Structures- Second Edition• Practice Standard for SchedulingPrograms• The Standard for Program Management- Second EditionPeople• Project Manager Competency Development Framework - Second EditionOrganizations• Organizational Project Management Maturity Model (OPM3®)- Second Edition• The Standard for Portfolio Management- Second Edition 2
  3. 3. Alignment with PMI Standards PMBOK® Guide Third Edition PMP® Role Delineation Study and PMCD Framework Career Framework First Edition Project Manager Competency Program/ Portfolio Development Combined Management Standards Framework Standards Glossary/ PM Lexicon PMP® PMI Code of Examination Specification Professional Conduct OPM3® 3
  4. 4. PMCDF - Second EditionVision:We provide the basis forindividuals and organizationsto raise their competence inProject Management andraise the level ofprofessionalism within PMI 4
  5. 5. Target Audience• Project Managers• Managers of project managers• Members of a Project Management Office• Managers responsible for establishing and developing Project Manager competence• Educators teaching project management and other related subjects• Trainers developing project management educational programs• Consultants in project/program management• Human Resource teams• Senior Management 5
  6. 6. PMCDF Overview• Provide support to individuals and organizations• Provide guidance for the assessment of Project Managers who: – Demonstrated necessary project management knowledge by passing a suitable exam (e.g. PMP) – Are able to provide evidence of performance and personal competence – Have 3-4 years of project management experience• Based on a generic project manager (industry agnostic)• Supported by data from PM Role Delineation Study 6
  7. 7. Project Management Competence
  8. 8. What is “Competence”?• Merriam-Webster : The quality or state of […] having requisite or adequate ability or qualities.• Cambridge: Having the skills or knowledge to do something well enough to meet a basic standard.• Oxford: The quality or extent of […] having the necessary skill or knowledge to do something successfully.• Wikipedia: Competence is a standardized requirement for an individual to properly perform a specific job. It encompasses a combination of knowledge, skills and behaviour utilised to improve performance. More generally, competence is the state or quality of being adequately or well qualified, having the ability to perform a specific role. 8
  9. 9. PMCDF DefinitionsProject management competence is the demonstratedability to perform activities within a project environmentthat leads to expected outcomes based on defined andaccepted standards.A competent project manager consistently applieshis/her knowledge, skills and personal characteristics todeliver projects that meet stakeholders’ requirements. 9
  10. 10. Dimensions of PM Competence• Knowledge - what the project manager knows about the application of processes, tools and techniques to project activities.• Performance - how the project manager applies project management knowledge to meet the project requirements.• Personal - how the project manager behaves when performing activities within the project environment; their attitudes and core personality characteristics. 10
  11. 11. Knowledge Competence• What a person knows about project management discipline and how projects should be planned, executed and controlled• Required knowledge is defined by the PMP® Examination Specification• A project manager demonstrates knowledge by passing an appropriately credentialed assessment (e.g. PMP®) 11
  12. 12. PMCDF Competencies 12
  13. 13. Performance Competence
  14. 14. Performance Competence• What is the person able to do by applying their project management knowledge• Project manager’s performance can be demonstrated by assessing project related outcomes• The ultimate evidence is successful delivery of projects• A competent project manager can provide evidence of compliance with defined performance criteria 14
  15. 15. Structure 5 Units 34 Elements 131 Competence CriteriaOne to one mapping between Competence Criteria and Evidences 15
  16. 16. AlignmentUnits: Defined by PMP Examination Specification(Performance Domains)Elements: Aligned with the PMP Examination Specification(outcomes the PM should deliver)Criteria: Defined by the PMCDF update team using the 2003document and the PMP Exam Spec (specific actions toachieve desired outcomes)Evidences: Defined by the PMCDF update team (materialresults of PM actions) 16
  17. 17. Units of Performance CompetenceInitiating: authorize and define the scope of a new project.Planning: define and mature the project scope, develop the projectmanagement plan, and identify and schedule the project activities.Executing: performing the work defined in the projectmanagement plan to accomplish the project objectives under theproject scope statement.Monitoring and Controlling: compare actual performance withplanned performance, analyze variances, assess trends to effectprocess improvements, evaluate possible alternatives andimplement appropriate corrective action as needed.Closing: formally terminate a project and transfer the completedproduct to operations or to close a cancelled project. 17
  18. 18. Performance Competence Elements Monitoring & Initiating a Project Planning a Project Executing a Project Closing a Project Controlling a Project Project outcomesProject aligned with Project scope agreed Project goals Project tracked and accepted by allorganization objectives to address project achieved through status communicated to stakeholdersand customer deliverables effective project plan relevant stakeholdersneeds execution Project formally Project schedule Change is managed closedScope statement reflects developed Project stakeholders’organization and expectations managed Quality controlled Project resources customer needs and Cost management plan successfully releasedexpectations developed Risks managed to Human resources ensure minimized StakeholderHigh level risks/ Project Team identified available when impact on project perceptionsassumptions/ with agreed roles and required outcomes measured andconstraints responsibilitiesare understood Tasks successfully Project team managed analyzed Communication completed as plannedKey stakeholders activities approved Sellers managedneeds are understood Quality managed Quality plannedDraft project charter Material resources available Risk plan approved available as requiredProject charter approved Change management processes established Materials procured Approved project plan 18
  19. 19. Criteria and Evidences Element High level risks, assumptions and constraints are understood Performance Criteria Types of evidence .1 Establishes the project’s high Documented assumptions level assumptions and and constraints Constraints Documented list of .2 Identifies and analyses analyzed high level risks the project’s high level risks reviewed with key stakeholders Performance Criteria Types of Evidence
  20. 20. Personal Competence
  21. 21. Personal Competence• Personal Competencies are those behaviors, attitudes and core personality characteristics that contribute to a person’s ability to manage projects.• Personal competence enable the project manager to effectively use knowledge and performance competencies• Demonstrated by how the person behaves while delivering the project 21
  22. 22. Structure 6 Units 30 Elements 134 Competence CriteriaOne to many mapping between Competence Criteria and Evidences 22
  23. 23. AlignmentUnits: Derived from 2003 PMCDF, Code of Ethics andProfessional Conduct and PMP Examination SpecificationElements: Derived from 2003 PMCDF, PMBOK, PMP ExamSpecification, Code of Ethics and Professional ConductCriteria: Defined by the PMCDF update team using the 2003document, PMBOK, PMP Exam Spec and Code of Ethics andProfessional ConductEvidences: Defined by the PMCDF update team (materialresults that demonstrate, alone or in conjunction with otherevidences, the presence of the desired behavior) 23
  24. 24. Units of Personal CompetenceCommunicating: Effectively exchanges accurate, appropriate andrelevant information with stakeholders using suitable methods.Leading: Guides, inspires and motivates team members and otherproject stakeholders to manage and overcome issues to effectivelyachieve project objectives.Managing: Effectively administers the project through deployment anduse of human, financial, material, intellectual and intangible resources.Cognitive Ability: Applies an appropriate depth of perception,discernment and judgment to effectively direct a project in a changingand evolving environment.Effectiveness: Produces desired results by using appropriate resources,tools and techniques in all project management activities.Professionalism: Conforms to an ethical behavior governed byresponsibility, respect, fairness and honesty in the practice of projectmanagement 24
  25. 25. Personal Competence Elements 25
  26. 26. Criteria and Evidences Element Actively listens, understands and responds to stakeholders Survey results from stakeholders Documented observations 1 Actively listens from communication Documented feedback on empathy and understanding towards others point of view Performance Criteria Types of Evidence
  27. 27. Developing Competence As A Project Manager
  28. 28. PMCDF Competencies
  29. 29. Supporting Competencies• PMI Standards are “applicable to most projects most of the time”, so they must be generic• PM also needs technical skills that are particularly relevant to that industry or covered by specific domain, regulatory or legal requirements• To be successful in an organizational context the PM also needs to understand the corporate culture, environment, politics etc. 29
  30. 30. Competence Development Process 30
  31. 31. Competence Assessment• Performed by the individual or by the organization (e.g. by PMO or management)• Based on evidences against the PMCD Framework performance criteria• Could use different levels of detail for each competence area (unit, element or criteria)• The organization may prescribe qualitative, quantitative and interpretative methods to be used• When using a holistic approach, strength in one area could obscure one or more gaps in other areas 31
  32. 32. Assessment Rigor• Low Rigor – typically involves casual self-assessment, or informal assessment against the competence criteria.• Medium Rigor – more detailed, usually done by a manager or peer, adding external feedback to individual’s perspective to create a 360º view.• High Rigor – in-depth assessment, usually performed by qualified independent assessors, involving analysis of several recent projects to gather relevant evidence. 32
  33. 33. Assessment Example Personal Competencies ScoreCommunicating 8.00Leading 7.00Managing 5.00 Builds and maintains the project team 5.00 Plans and manages for project success in an organized manner 7.00 Resolves conflict involving project team or stakeholders 3.00Cognitive Ability 7.00Effectiveness 4.75 Resolves project problems 8.00 Maintains project stakeholder involvement, motivation and support 4.00 Changes at the required pace to meet project needs 5.00 Uses assertiveness when necessary 2.00Professionalism 9.00 33
  34. 34. Assessment Example Personal Competencies Score Communicating 8.00 Leading 7.00 Managing 5.00 Cognitive Ability 7.00 Effectiveness 4.75 Professionalism 9.00 Communicating 10 8 6 Professionalism Leading 4 2 0 Effectiveness Managing Cognitive Ability 34
  35. 35. Assessment Example Element 6.1: Actively listens, understands, and responds to stakeholders Performance Criteria Types of Evidence Status Comments.1 Actively listens Survey results from stakeholders medium no complaints, but no positive feedback either Documented observations from communication good not interrupting others while speaking, nodding to show understanding Documented feedback on empathy and low often focused on the words, missing the emotions understanding towards others point of view reflected by the voice.2 Understands explicit Documented observations from communication medium rephrasing stakeholders messages to demonstrateand implicit content of understanding typically generates agreementcommunication Documented confirmation that messages were very good almost no situation when a stakeholder needed to received and understood repeat the message to clarify misunderstandings.3 Responds to and acts Documented responses to issues important to good issue log maintained accurate and timelyupon expectations, others (i.e. Issues Log)concerns and issues Change requests very low no documentation on change requests, their analysis and results Survey results from stakeholders medium no complaints, but no positive feedback either 35
  36. 36. Development Plan• Individual strengths and areas to be addressed• Prioritized development areas• Using different methods: – Mentoring – Coaching – Peer to peer – Role playing – On the job training – Formal training – PMI Education programs 36
  37. 37. Development Plan Example 37
  38. 38. Execute PlanThe project manager needs to execute this plan just asa project manager would execute any project plan.• Plan owned by the PM• Medium and long term goals• Targets and milestones• In parallel with project work• Engage support from others• Monitor progress and take corrective actions 38
  39. 39. Development Plan Example 39
  40. 40. Evaluate Plan• Iterative process to develop competence as a project manager• Each iteration of the Competence Development Plan should be treated as a project in itself.• As with any project there needs to be a formal review of plan’s success• Lessons learned and action items 40
  41. 41. Evaluate PlanQuestions that need to be asked include: – Was the plan suitable? – Did the plan deliver the outcomes needed? – Was there sufficient support for the development plan? – Were there activities that should have provided better outcomes? – Can others now use the same plan? 41
  42. 42. A Guide to the Top
  43. 43. Career Path E x e c u tiv e P M O M anager P o r tfo lio M a n a g e r M anagem ent S M E P r o je c t M anager P rogram M anager P ro je c t D ir e c to r O rg a n iz a tio n a l S r . P r o je c t M a n a g e r M anagem ent O rg a n iz a tio n a l P r o je c t M a n a g e r M anagem ent J r . P r o je ct M a n a g e r P r o je c t C o n tr o lle r T e c h n ic a l P r o je c t L e a d e r P ro je c t C o o r d in a to r L e a d e rs A d m in sta ff P r o je c t A ssista n t 43
  44. 44. Project Assistant Performs routine tasks like updating the schedule, monitoring people’s availability, centralize and monitor costs and so on. Usually evolves in a project coordinator role. • Responsibility: Performance Competence Initiating – Collects and archives project forms (NDAs, copyright, technical setup etc) 10 – Collects and centralizes regular status reports, time sheets, expenses etc. 5 – Maintains project documents repository Closing Planning 0 – Other project administration tasks • Authority: Monitoring and Executing – Always under the guidance and supervision of the Project Manager Controlling – Can initiate recurring tasks of pre-defined repetitive activities (e.g. call for status reports, timesheets or expenses) Personal Com petence Communicating 10 – Cannot take decisions without the Project ManagerProfessionalism 5 Leading • Competence: – General exposure to Project Management principles 0 – Organized, detail oriented Effectiveness Managing – Good communication skills for interaction with team members Cognitive Ability 44
  45. 45. Project Coordinator Without extensive experience and usually without formal project management training, aproject coordinator handles sub-projects or simple independent projects under supervision, mostly acting in a facilitation and reporting capacity. • Responsibility: Performance Competence – Coordinates and monitors tasks execution and progress Initiating 10 – Provides consolidated status reports to the PM – Facilitates work by resolving minor team member issues 5 Closing Planning – Escalates to the PM risks and issues with potential significant impact 0 – Monitors project costs and resource usage • Authority: Monitoring and Controlling Executing – Activates under the supervision of a project or organizational manager – Manages detailed activities in sub-projects or small projects – Assigns tasks to team members and require progress reports Personal Com petence Communicating – Can implement corrective actions for small project deviations 10 • Competence:Professionalism 5 Leading – General knowledge of Project Management principles and methodology 0 – Knowledge of project scheduling and monitoring tools – Understanding of quality and cost control processes Effectiveness Managing – Ability to organize the work for self and others Cognitive Ability – Good communication skills for interaction with team members 45
  46. 46. Project Leader A technical expert that might have no formal project management training, able to delivergood products but not always achieve project success – in most cases because deficiencies in the interaction with stakeholders leads to scope creep or gold-plating. • Responsibility: Performance Competence – Participates in project planning and estimating Initiating 10 – Coordinates and monitors tasks execution and progress – Provides consolidated status reports to the PM 5 Closing Planning – Provides technical support to team members 0 – Escalates to the PM risks and issues with potential significant impact • Authority: Monitoring and Controlling Executing – Activates under the supervision of a project or organizational manager – Has autonomy in managing end-to-end sub-projects or small projects – Has authority to assign tasks to team members and require progress reports Personal Com petence Communicating – Can implement corrective actions for small project deviations 10 • Competence: Professionalism Leading 5 – Expert level in the project technical area 0 – General understanding of Project Management principles – Knowledge of work estimating techniques Effectiveness Managing – Ability to organize the work for self and others Cognitive Ability – Basic leadership and general management skills – Basic communication and negotiation capabilities 46
  47. 47. Project ControllerWith formal training in project management and/or specific areas (mostly scheduling, cost and risks) performs a monitoring and control function of specific project perspective(s). • Responsibility: Performance Competence – Collects, analyses and interprets performance data Initiating 10 – Monitors tasks execution and progress – Provides consolidated status reports to the PM 5 Closing Planning – Escalates to the PM risks and issues with potential significant impact 0 • Authority: – Activates under the supervision of a project manager Monitoring and Controlling Executing – Ensures collection, processing and approval processes – No direct authority over project staff Personal Com petence • Competence: Communicating 10 – General knowledge of Project Management principles and methodology – Knowledge of project scheduling and monitoring toolsProfessionalism 5 Leading – Understanding of quality and cost control processes 0 Effectiveness Managing Cognitive Ability 47
  48. 48. Junior Project ManagerTypically having formal project management training but not extensive experience, a junior project manager handles autonomously small independent projects, usually under the guidance or mentorship of a more senior project manager. • Responsibility: Performance Competence – Performs overall project planning based on predefined Charter Initiating 10 – Defined, estimates and schedules project work to achieve the scope Coordinates and monitors tasks execution and progress 5 Closing Planning – Provides consolidated status reports to stakeholders 0 – Takes corrective actions as required to keep the project on track • Authority: Monitoring and Controlling Executing – Reports to a project executive or sponsor, normally mid or high management – Has autonomy over project team within chartered boundaries – Can negotiate scope, resources and schedule changes with stakeholders Personal Com petence Communicating 10 – Assigns tasks to team members and manages work – Implements corrective actions for small project deviationsProfessionalism 5 Leading • Competence: 0 – Knowledge of Project Management principles and methodology Effectiveness Managing – Knowledge of project scheduling and monitoring tools – Understanding of quality and cost control processes Cognitive Ability – Stakeholders management through negotiation and conflict resolution – Good communication skills for interaction with team members 48
  49. 49. Project Manager Even if "all scope, in time and within budget" target remains sometimes out of reach, aproject manager has the tools, knowledge and experience to drive the project toward project success by applying appropriate techniques and behaviors. • Responsibility: Performance Competence – Performs overall project planning based on predefined Charter Initiating 10 – Defined, estimates and schedules project work to achieve the scope – Manages, monitors and forecasts project execution 5 Closing Planning – Takes corrective actions as required to keep the project on track. 0 – Ensures effective communication with internal and external stakeholders – Projects lifecycle improvement through lessons learned, project archives, etc. Monitoring and Controlling Executing • Authority: – Manages end-to-end tactical projects of various size – Has authority over the project team as defined in the project charter Personal Com petence Communicating 10 – Reports to a project executive or sponsor, normally mid or high management – Has autonomy within project boundariesProfessionalism 5 Leading – Can negotiate scope, resources and schedule changes with stakeholders 0 • Competence: – In-depth knowledge of PM methodology, tools and techniques Effectiveness Managing – Leadership and general management skills Cognitive Ability – Stakeholders communication, negotiation, influencing, persuasion, etc – Consistent professional behavior in all activities 49
  50. 50. Senior Project Manager Manage complex projects based on sound methodological knowledge as well as advanced people skills, seeking project’s alignment to business needs even beyond chartered scope statement and realistically adjusting predefined organizational processes and policies. • Responsibility: Performance Competence – Involved in projects initiation and strategic project alignment Initiating 10 – Guides, mentors and/or performs project planning for all knowledge areas – Takes corrective actions as required to deliver complete scope, at desired 5 Closing Planning quality, in time and within budget 0 – Process and methodological improvement • Authority: Monitoring and Controlling Executing – Manages end-to-end strategic projects, large in scope, budget and team – Reports to an organizational manager or a program/portfolio manager. – Coordinates project leaders or coordinators assigned to deliver subproject of Personal Com petence Communicating a complex project managed by the senior project manager 10 – Proposes changes to the PM methodology, framework or best practicesProfessionalism 5 Leading • Competence: 0 – Expert knowledge of PM methodology, tools and techniques (typically PMP) – Advanced leadership and general management skills Effectiveness Managing – Advanced communication, negotiation, conflict resolution capabilities – Understanding of organizational environment and project’s alignment to Cognitive Ability corporate objectives 50
  51. 51. Project DirectorCoordinates a number of projects (and their corresponding project managers), usually acting on behalf of an executive or project sponsor, or of the client or user community group. Typically focused on feasibility and efficiency, also requires significant PM knowledge • Responsibility: Performance Competence – Projects initiation and strategic project alignment Initiating 10 – Guides, mentors and/or coordinates project managers – Ensures alignment with business objectives and needs 5 Closing Planning – Process and methodological improvement 0 • Authority: – Coordinates multiple projects from a strategic perspective Monitoring and Controlling Executing – Reports to an executive or a program/portfolio manager. – Ensures stakeholders expectations management, including contractual negotiations and performance Personal Com petence Communicating – Proposes changes to the PM methodology, framework or best practices 10 • Competence:Professionalism 5 Leading – Demonstrated understanding of organizational environment and projects’ 0 alignment to corporate objectives – Advanced leadership and general management skills Effectiveness Managing – Advanced communication, negotiation, conflict resolution capabilities Cognitive Ability – Knowledge of PM methodology, tools and techniques 51
  52. 52. SME Project Manager Typically part of a PMO, has advanced overall project management knowledge (PMP) anddemonstrated expertise in one or more specialized areas such as methodologies, cost control, scheduling, projects and processes quality improvement. • Responsibility: Performance Competence – Guides, mentors and/or coordinates project managers Initiating 10 – Process and methodological improvement – Participates in organizational process improvement 5 Closing Planning 0 • Authority: – Defines and/or approves changes to the PM methodology, framework or Monitoring and Controlling Executing best practices – Approves methodology adjustments for specific projects Personal Com petence Communicating 10 • Competence: – Advanced knowledge of PM methodology, tools and techniquesProfessionalism 5 Leading – Expertise in one or more knowledge areas 0 – Ability to coach, mentor, train other project managers Effectiveness Managing Cognitive Ability 52
  53. 53. PMO ManagerCombining organizational and project management knowledge the PMO Manager ensuresdevelopment, application and advancement of project management principles, methodology and framework throughout the enterprise. • Responsibility: Performance Competence – Manages members of the PM Office Initiating 10 – Guides, mentors and/or coordinates project managers – Negotiates with executives the role and responsibilities of PMO in 5 Closing Planning organization 0 – Participates in organizational process improvement • Authority: Monitoring and Controlling Executing – Time and activities assignment of PMO members – Endorses or approves projects initiation – Approves changes to the PM methodology, framework or best practices Personal Com petence Communicating – Approves methodology adjustments for specific projects 10 • Competence:Professionalism Leading 5 – Organizational management abilities 0 – Advanced knowledge of PM methodology, tools and techniques – Ability to manage, coach, mentor, train other project managers Effectiveness Managing – Advanced communication skills in negotiation, influencing, persuasion Cognitive Ability etc 53
  54. 54. Program Manager As typically considered still a tactical role it requires solid project/program management knowledge, but also the ability to understand the business objectives that program has to achieve, and its alignment within the overall organizational strategy Performance Competence • Responsibility: Initiating – Ensure alignment of subordinated projects with business objectives 10 – Prioritization and assignment of shared resources to program components 5 – Assessment and monitoring of projects business and financial performance Closing Planning – Monitors program components relationships and dependencies, as well as 0 overall integration and issues resolution • Authority: Monitoring and Controlling Executing – Coordinates the PMs delivering individual projects within the program – Has autonomy within the program boundaries, under the guidance of an organizational executive or of a portfolio manager Personal Com petence Communicating – Negotiates scope and schedule adjustments within reporting structure 10 – Process and methodological tailoring to better fit programs particularitiesProfessionalism 5 Leading • Competence: 0 – Expert knowledge of project and program management methodology, tools and techniques Effectiveness Managing – Strong tactical planning and leadership skills Cognitive Ability – Strong communication, negotiation, conflict resolution capabilities – Advanced understanding of corporate environment and objectives 54
  55. 55. Portfolio ManagerMostly concerned with business performance analysis, authorizing or not projects initiationor continuance at predefined phase gates, efficient distribution of organizations resources to achieve maximum results in terms or strategic achievements. Performance Competence • Responsibility: Initiating – Strategic management of portfolio components (projects and programs) 10 – Assessment and monitoring of business and financial performance 5 – Authorizes and manages portfolio components relationships and Closing Planning dependencies, as well as overall integration and issues resolution 0 – Ensures distribution of organizational resources between components. • Authority: Monitoring and Controlling Executing – Coordinates project, program and line managers within the portfolio area – Has autonomy with portfolio limits, reporting to an executive committee – Negotiates projects initiation based on performance and resources Personal Com petence Communicating 10 – Institutes adequate controls for underlying programs and projects – Proposes enhancements to portfolio management methodology/frameworkProfessionalism Leading 5 • Competence: 0 – Project, program and portfolio management methodology and framework – Business acumen with strong strategic visioning and tactical planning Effectiveness Managing – Objective decision-making ability, based on strategic objectives priority, Cognitive Ability business performance analysis and resources availability – Strong communication, negotiation and influencing capabilities 55
  56. 56. Summary
  57. 57. The Framework• The PMCD Framework defines the Performance and Personal Competencies required for a competent project manager.• The PMCDF-Second Edition was developed to provide both individuals and organizations with guidance on how to assess, plan and manage the professional development of a Project Manager• Each person or organization should customize the framework to its own specific needs. 57
  58. 58. The Process• Identify the target and specific competencies required for that position.• Assess current level of competence, identify gaps, plan development, execute the competence development plan and then repeat the process.• Use of the framework will provide a structured approach to the continuing journey of competence development for individuals as well as organizations. 58
  59. 59. Career Path E x e c u tiv e P M O M anager P o r tfo lio M a n a g e r M anagem ent S M E P r o je c t Good M anager P rogram M anager P ro je c t D ir e c to r luck! O rg a n iz a tio n a l S r . P r o je c t M a n a g e r M anagem ent O rg a n iz a tio n a l P r o je c t M a n a g e r M anagem ent P J r . P r o je ct M a n a g e r P r o je c t C o n tr o lle r M C T e c h n ic a l L e a d e rs P r o je c t L e a d e r P ro je c t C o o r d in a to r D F A d m in sta ff P r o je c t A ssista n t
  60. 60. Questions? George Jucan gjucan@opendatasys.com 60
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