Resources for
youth
transitioning
from foster care
to living on
their own
Partners for Forever Families
Permanency Symposi...
Life’s Transitions Do
Not Happen Overnight
Recommended Reading: Congressional Coalition on Adoption
Institute’s 2012 Foste...
Transition to Young Adulthood for
for a young person with loving,
involved parents
Transition to Young Adulthood
for a foster care youth who “ages out”
Lack of Family Privilege
When the only legal “parent”
you have is the state and federal
government
Foster Care Alumni of America’s
“Culture of Fost...
When the only “parent”
you have doesn’t always
recognize their role
Foster Care Alumni of America’s
“Culture of Foster Car...
Federal Interventions
to Improve Youth Outcomes
What’s an Exit
Plan?
*a.k.a.
• “Discharge/Case-Closing Plan”
• “Self-Sufficiency/Emancipation Plan”
• “Transition Plan”
• ...
Federal Legislation
Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing
Adoptions Act of 2008
Title II, Section 202
• Mandates...
Ohio Administrative Code
• Ninety days prior to the youth’s emancipation
from the agency’s custody, the PCSA or PCPA
shall...
I never knew I had
an Exit Plan
Blindfold Activity
Involving Youth Voice in
Plans for Their Future
Foster Care Alumni of America’s
“Culture of Foster Care”
Postcard Project
Proactive response of the
Ohio Supreme Court
Essential Elements:
“Name That Logo”
What are FUP Vouchers?
Housing Choice Vouchers
• “Youth 18-21 years old who left foster
care after the age of 16 and lack
...
Foster care youth voice
in expanding Ohio Medicaid
until age 21
• Eligibility: Under 21, in foster care on 18th
birthday, received IV-E funding/services prior to
age 18
• Application pro...
• FCASPL 183 (Ind. Living Transition Plans)
• Family, Children, and Adult Services Procedure
Letter No. 183, sent out by D...
Vital Documents:
Prior to the youth’s emancipation from the agency’s
custody, the PCSA or PCPA shall coordinate with the
f...
Life As A Juggling Act
Federal Legislation
John H. Chafee Foster Care Independence Act
Signed into law, December 1999
• Provides for flexible fun...
Educational Training Vouchers:
Definition of an
“Independent Student”
Three categories:
• Student who is an orphan, in foster care, or
a ward of the cour...
John H. Chafee Foster Care
Independence Program
Chafee funding can be used to pay for:
•Housing (up to 30% of allocation)
...
Benefits for eligible
foster care youth
• The ETV program is a federally-funded,
state-administered program that provides
...
Eligibility for
ETV Funds
A current, or former foster youth who:
– Was in foster care on their 18th birthday and aged
out ...
Mission Statement:
Ohio Reach improves post-secondary outcomes
for foster care youth and alumni through
advocacy, leadersh...
Foster Care Alumni of America’s
“Culture of Foster Care”
Postcard Project
Improving Outcomes;
Changing the Odds
Empowering Youth
to Plan for the Future
Federal Legislation
Workforce Investment Act
Signed into law in 1998
Workforce Investment Act (WIA) services support 9 of ...
1998 Workforce Investment Act
WIA funds can be used for:
• One-Stop Centers
• Youth Service Programs (low-income, high
ris...
Workforce Connections:
Connecting the Dots Conference
Suits
For
Success
Resume
Clinic
The Purple Project
Founded by LaTasha Watts
Helping young people develop a
vision for the future
B-E-G-I-N
Consumer Voice in the Process:
1.) Allen
2.) Athens
3.) Cuyahoga
4.) Fairfield
5.) Franklin
6.) Greene
7.) Hamilton
8.) Lorain
9.) Lucas-NW
10.) Mahoning...
TAGyc
Teen Advisory Group
youth council
Interdependence
Recommended Reading: Transitioning Youth: Blending the Worlds of Permanency
and Independent Living. The Ca...
Emerging from foster care to
young adulthood:
1. Level of Preparation
2. Availability of a Safety Net
Who were
the top three
people in
your Safety
Net and
why?
Copyright Lisa Dickson
Permanency Pact:
What exactly
can I rely on you for?
It is critical to the youth’s success to identify those adults
who will continue to pr...
Life Dice
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  • Welcome. We are here today to talk about and explore RESOURCES for youth “aging out” of foster care in their transition to living on their own. What’s the first thing you think of when you see this picture? (allow time for participants to respond) Imagine this young person run-run-running out of foster care and taking the big LEAP out into the sky and into adulthood Our young people are Ready to Launch – but can feel like a free fall Today, we are going to explore RESOURCES that can improve their long-term OUTCOMES
  • Section of the 2012 CCAI's Foster Youth Internship Report titled, " Life's Transitions Do Not Happen Overnight :" *pg. 56 "Life's transitions are a critical part of human development." "The current foster system is designed with the expectation that the transition from adolescence into adulthood can occur overnight." "Autonomy plays a critical role in adolescent development; however... the strict rules and regulations placed on foster youth by the state, foster parents and group home staff limits the amount of independence the youth experience."
  • Transition to adulthood: a.) for a foster care youth vs. b.) for a child with loving, involved parents
  • Transition to adulthood: a.) for a foster care youth vs. b.) for a child with loving, involved parents
  • In attempting to capture this challenge in words, first and foremost is: Lack of family privilege I’m not just a former foster youth – I’m also a stepmother. And, from the moment I was entrusted with my stepdaughters, I took on the charge of being a permanent emotional connection in their lives and preparing them for adulthood. It has been estimated that nearly a quarter of the cost of raising children is now provided after the age of 17. The average parent of 18-34 year olds provides over $2,000/year to support them. Half of young adults ages 18-24 in the U.S.A. live at home with their parents, according Children's Rights . Most young adults in the general population rely upon their families for assistance with a place to live, financial support and other guidance as they transition to adulthood. Meanwhile, the 25,000 young people aging out of foster care each year don't have a parent's basement to live in. They don't have anyone to co-sign for them to rent an apartment. When they go to college, they can't call "mom" and "dad" if they blow their budget and need help, and they don't have a place to spend college breaks, unless their college has taken this need into consideration.
  • Our young people today are the adults of tomorrow. We have the opportunity to positively impact their future, and send them on a trajectory toward a successful young adulthood. Just like with our own children, they might stumble along the way – but with identified means of emotional support, they can make it through the storms of their lives, and continue to soar into their future.
  • FCAA postcard: “I need you to care”
  • Please note – the federal government itself DOES recognize that this is part of their role : Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act – Exit Plan provisions John H. Chafee Foster Care Independence Program – Funding and requirements Workforce Investment Act – Eligibility and pilot expansion
  • Wouldn’t it be great if we planned for these things ahead of time. It’s wise to have an exit strategy. One tool = a 90-day exit plan. Its definition and purpose
  • Preparing youth for the future – this is not an OPTION, this is FEDERAL LAW The Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 outlines federal requirements regarding essential elements to be covered in the development of a 90-day transition plan.
  • STATE LAW The reason that the Youth Developed Discharge Plan is being piloted (in five Ohio counties) is because Ohio youth have reported NOT being provided with / involved in the development of a 90-day transition plan. “ The goal of an exit plan is to identify anticipated service needs for older youth who are in the process of transitioning out of foster care. Youth who have a comprehensive transition plan are better equipped to transition successfully from foster care to self-sufficiency. An unintended consequence of not preparing youth to exit from foster care is the youth becoming homeless.” (Missouri Dept. of Social Services)
  • So….. What good is a plan if nobody knows about it? At the OHIO YAB meeting – July 21, 2011, youth in attendance reported having NO knowledge of any sort of plan for their future by the custodial agency
  • How many of you have children? (teens / young adults) As parents, we know that what matters most in terms of involving the unique voices and insights of our children How likely is a plan for their future to succeed without their input? As “parents,” we know that. Youth need to speak candidly and articulately about what they want for their lives, not just today but for their futures. If given responsibility and adequate support they will be able to create a constructive action plan that will help them reach their goals.  They are the best advocates for themselves and must be a part of the process.
  • OHIO YAB meeting – July 21, 2011
  • The plan shall include information regarding: (WHITEBOARD ACTIVITY) Post-Emancipation Services (if available) Healthcare ; insurance, power of attorney Higher Ed ; secondary, post-secondary Housing ; obtaining, paying for Budgeting ; credit report Selective Services (males must register) Existing Court Fees (preexisting) Existing Benefits ; i.e. Social Security
  • NAME THAT RESOURCE – each logo represents an existing resource OR funding stream 1. Foster Youth Advocacy Center – Capital Law School – identity theft, credit report, existing court fees, power of attorney, referrals for citizenship issues, vital records, steps to expunge delinquency records 2. Ohio Benefit Bank – Taxes, FAFSA, Ohio Universal Youth Transition Plan 3. Medicaid 4. Social Security 5. HUD – FUP vouchers Selective Services (males must register) Existing Benefits ; i.e. Social Security
  • In the interest of time, we are going to focus on exploring FIVE specific funding streams Housing choice vouchers: “Youth 18-21 years old who left foster care after the age of 16 and lack adequate housing.” (Congress, Oct. 2000) Housing Options Dormitories Scattered Site Apartments Supervised Apartments Boarding Houses Host Homes / Adult Roommates Shelters Subsidized Housing *Lighthouse Youth Services: room to grow
  • The Ohio Medicaid program includes health care coverage for youth, who aged out of foster care on their 18th birthdays, until age 21, regardless of income. Eligibility You are under age 21. You were in foster care under the responsibility of the State on your 18th birthday. You received Title IV-E foster care maintenance payments or independent living services furnished by a program funded under Title IV-E, before you reached age 18. Your PCSA or independent living services worker sends a JFS 01958 form and a Medicaid application to the CDJFS to identify you as a Former Foster Care Youth. Steps to Apply Apply for Medicaid Be sure to identify yourself as a former foster care youth Cooperate in establishing eligibility, by providing documents requested by your CDJFS caseworker. Maintaining Coverage Report changes in address, telephone number, etc. to your CDJFS caseworker within a few days of the change
  • The Ohio Medicaid program includes health care coverage for youth, who aged out of foster care on their 18th birthdays, until age 21, regardless of income. Eligibility You are under age 21. You were in foster care under the responsibility of the State on your 18th birthday. You received Title IV-E foster care maintenance payments or independent living services furnished by a program funded under Title IV-E, before you reached age 18. Your PCSA or independent living services worker sends a JFS 01958 form and a Medicaid application to the CDJFS to identify you as a Former Foster Care Youth. Steps to Apply Apply for Medicaid Be sure to identify yourself as a former foster care youth Cooperate in establishing eligibility, by providing documents requested by your CDJFS caseworker. Maintaining Coverage Report changes in address, telephone number, etc. to your CDJFS caseworker within a few days of the change
  • JFS PROCEDURAL LETTER Immunization Record - complete and up to date; •Health Records and Medical Card - allergies, hospitalizations, treatments,medications; list of all past medical exams with diagnoses (if there are any), childhood diseases; Medicaid Resources for Emancipated Foster Youth Since 2007, foster care youth who "age out" of foster care in Ohio are eligible for Medicaid until their 21st birthday.  ODJFS recently obtained data that shows very poor enrollment of these youth in Medicaid.  ODJFS recently provided training to county children service agencies to inform them of the procedures required to transition a child to the adult Medicaid program.  Click here and here for general Medicaid to 21 resources provided at the training.  Below is an overview of the forms required: Enrolling in Medicaid : The child's caseworker must complete three separate forms in order to enroll them into the adult Medicaid program. Referral For Medicaid Continuing Eligibility Review: JFS 01958 Combined Program Application: JFS 07216 Consumer Rights and Responsibilities: JFS 07236 All three forms must be completed in order for the enrollment to be processed. Maintaining Coverage Until Age 21 : If youth don't stay in touch with Medicaid, they will lose services at age 19 or 20. This is because Medicaid eligibility must be verified each year. Therefore, it is vitally important for emancipated youth to notify Ohio Medicaid whenever they change their residence, phone number, and/or email address. For Additional Support, Please Contact: Medicaid Hotline: (800) 324-8680 Medicaid email address: [email_address]
  • Youth Access to Vital Documentation The Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 outlines federal requirements regarding essential elements to be covered in the development of a 90-day transition plan. Both federal law and Ohio Administrative Code require that prior to the youth’s emancipated from foster care, they need to receive ORIGINALS (not copies) of these three documents. What Other Documentation Might Help? Letter of Verification of Dependency Immunization records Free credit report (www.annualcreditreport.com) Tribal information when applicable Death Certificates of parents, when applicable Information on registering to vote Information to males to sign up for the selective services (30 days prior to 18 or 30 days after 18) Information on any existing court fees associated with the youth’s name prior to emancipation.
  • Possibly do balloon activity
  • John H. Chafee Foster Care Independence Program Signed into law in December 1999, The Foster Care Independence Act: 1. Provides for flexible funding for distribution to States through grants for program services for youth. 2. Provides opportunities for States to serve youth who are likely to remain in foster care and those who have aged out of foster care up to 21 years of age. 3. Enables youth to make better choices and accept greater responsibility for their own lives. 4. Enables older youth (18-21) to receive housing assistance if needed. 5. Provides States the option of allowing these young people to remain eligible for Medicaid up to age 21. Since the enactment of the Foster Care Independence Act of 1999, state child welfare agencies have made great strides in implementing independent living programs. However, many gaps in services remain. States, and their individual counties, continue to struggle with the challenge of providing all eligible youth “aging out” of foster care with consistent access to independent living and aftercare services.
  • College Cost Reduction and Access Act It amends the definition of an “independent student” by adding the following three categories:* - Student who is an orphan, in foster care, or a ward of the court, at any time when the student was 13 years of age or older - Student who is an emancipated minor or is in legal guardianship as determined by the court in their state of legal residence - Applicant is verified as an unaccompanied youth who is homeless or at risk of homelessness and self-supporting *Please note, the young person only needs to fit into one of the above categories in order to be eligible to claim independent status. Also, the act does not specify the length of time spent in foster care or the reason for exiting foster care.
  • Signed into Law in December 1999 Each state’s annual allocation is based on number of children in foster care (AFCARS) National Foster Care Coalition has compiled a list of FAQs re: what Chafee funding can be spent on Can Use Chafee Funding to Pay for: All Fees Associated with GED, ACT, SAT, and other Tests All Fees Associated with Post Secondary Enrollment Options (PSEO) Deposits and Application Fees Book Fees for Post Secondary Education Opportunities (PSEO) Tutoring Credit Recovery Summer School School Participation Fees (Sports, Clubs) Can Use Chafee Funding to Pay for: Tuition Housing Transportation Food Medical Childcare Can Use Chafee Funding to Pay for: Uniforms for Jobs (Scrubs, Required Shoes, etc.) Interview Clothing Employment Inventories Resume Writing Job Preparation (Customer Service Training, Word Processing, etc) Mock Interview Preparation/Job Coaching Assistance to Job Sites (Transportation, Hands-On Support, etc.)
  • The ETV Program, is a federally funded, state administered program, that provides grants up to $5000 per year to help former foster youth attend college and vocational training institutions. A U.S. citizen or qualified non-citizen. * ETV funding is a separate allocation from the state’s Chafee Independent Living Program award. Eligibility is determined by the Ohio State Independent Living Coordinator. ETV applications and related forms need to be filled once per year
  • The ETV Program, is a federally funded, state administered program, that provides grants up to $5000 per year to help former foster youth attend college and vocational training institutions. A U.S. citizen or qualified non-citizen. * ETV funding is a separate allocation from the state’s Chafee Independent Living Program award. Eligibility is determined by the Ohio State Independent Living Coordinator. ETV applications and related forms need to be filled once per year
  • Explain FCAA’s national postcard project: This postcard expresses one of the characteristics of the Culture of Foster Care: Having to beat the odds in order to succeed.
  • Explain FCAA’s national postcard project: This postcard expresses one of the characteristics of the Culture of Foster Care: Having to beat the odds in order to succeed.
  • GOOD NEWS = resources exist to change those stats!!! 1. Annie E. Casey Foundation and Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative Connecting foster youth with first-time job experiences IF YOUR STATE IS A “CASEY” STATE States/cities that offer this program include: Baltimore, MD; Hartford, CN; Providence, RI; San Antonio, TX; San Diego, CA and Maine. 2. 1998 Workforce Investment Act WIA funds can be used for: One-Stop Centers Youth Service Programs (low-income, high risk) Residential Training Programs like Job Corps
  • In 1998, Congress passed the Workforce Investment Act  to reform federal job training programs and create a new, comprehensive workforce investment system. The reformed system is intended to be customer-focused, to help Americans access the tools they need to manage their careers through information and high quality services, and to help U.S. companies find skilled workers. The principles of the Workforce Investment Act include: (a.) strong role for Boards and private sector, (b.) state and local flexibility, (c.) streamlined one-stop services, (d.) universal access, (e.) empowering individuals, (f.) connections between school and work.
  • Tapping into and partnering with Workforce Child welfare professionals aren’t always connected with local workforce development programs Youth employment experts are often unfamiliar with the child welfare system – and unaware of the unique challenges that we face when aging out of care Director Colbert’s Connecting the Dots initiative  CROSS-TRAINING Early Employment Exposure – we want our youth to: - Connect with the workplace at a young age - Identify and develop their skills and interests, relating to jobs Participate in h ands-on work experience Be engaged in the local community This is NYTD Requirement now (workforce training, vocational training, employment opps)
  • OHIO YAB meeting – July 21, 2011
  • OHIO YAB meeting – July 21, 2011
  • Stereotypes vs. Reality Who I was THEN vs. who I am NOW
  • Allen Athens Cuyahoga Fairfield Franklin Greene Lorain Lucas (NW) Mahoning Montgomery Stark Summit
  • OHIO YAB meeting – July 21, 2011
  • I like the term "interdependence."Because it's not a question of choosing between permanency and life skills -- our young people need BOTH Goal: To create/maintain meaningful connections for youth (Erikson Stage 6: Intimacy vs. Isolation) Otherwise, youth age out with no reliable adults to advise them or provide emotional support, so when they make a mistake, its life altering, and they nothing to fall back on. A mentor would be nice….
  • We do our work with VISION and we do our work with HOPE I like the term "inter-dependence.” Because it's not a question of choosing between EITHER permanency OR life skills -- our young people need BOTH As parents, do we choose between preparing our sons and daughters for living on their own and providing emotional support for them throughout the course of their lives?
  • What if you try to make the very best plans possible, but something falls apart along the way? If you are going to come hurtling through the sky, then obviously, you will want a SAFETY NET Safety net activity: Choose at least 3 adults that you trust. Fill in the contact information for each person in your safety net.
  • FOSTERING CONNECTIONS ACT Who are the people who helped to make you who you are today? It does take a village: During a youth panel at the 2006 Casey It's My Life conference, young people said that they needed an entire network of connections , and not just one person. It is often up to us to identify those key figures in a child’s life, and to facilitate the building of future relationships. Concurrent Permanency Planning offers caseworkers a structured approach to moving children more quickly from the uncertainty of foster care to the stability and security of a permanent family (having a back-up plan). Historically, caseworkers have been taught to plan in a straight-line, sequential fashion: first to work diligently toward reunification with the biological family; and if after a year—or two or three—reunification looks unlikely, to then switch gears and start planning for adoption or another permanency option. Unfortunately, by this time, the parents have usually become alienated from their child and the case planning process, the child will probably have to be moved from the temporary foster home to a pre-adoptive home, and the child’s length of stay in foster care has been prolonged unnecessarily. Chart the Connections: There are a variety of different ways to map out on paper who the teenager has in their lives and the level of connectedness, and safety related to those connections (timeline, circle, ecomap, genogram, connectedness map) Do not ask the youth to make a Family Tree. DO invite and include youth input. Introduction: “I don't know if you remember her but she remembers you as someone important in her life. As a social worker, I won’t always be around, but I want this information for her We’re worried about what might happen if she leaves foster care with no family connections.” (Ask for photos from childhood!!) Even if they can't parent the youth, they can provide some support to the youth. Tell them, “Your family has some responsibility for her - and here are some ways to help.” (my bio-fam could have been helpful) Reconnecting Can Be Painful Hearing that your biological father asked for a DNA test, for example… CBS interview with Leslie Stahl: Teens reunited with father -- only to discover that he was an alcoholic, their mother had died from a drug overdose and that their father has a total of 10 children, none of whom he had cared for. Imagine if you had built up hopes about your long-lost father. How he would come back into your life with a reason for being gone for so long. He was... abducted by aliens... in the Secret Service... stranded on a desert island. But, all the time he had been thinking of you, right? He had always been thinking of you. In that dream, your father isn't off fathering other children. He's not drowning his sorrows in a bottle. When dreams die, we feel sadness, anger and disappointment. That is a normal reaction to facing the rift between ideal and reality. Teens are idealists; they want adults to display perfection. It is hard to face human frailty, false promises… Preparation for permanency includes grieving the loss of people from their past, continuing to form personal identity, building trust and security through relationships, and developing an openness to forge permanent connections. Pain comes into our lives through relationships – but healing comes that way, too. Paint a realistic picture for the youth: Finding a permanent family is not fast and there is no guarantee of success. Be prepared for the youth to become impatient or discouraged. Prepare for daily questions from the youth about how the search is going. Discuss their expectations. Ask the youth if they would like to bring anything to share with the family, such as art work, crafts or a video. Take it slow: Give the youth details ahead of time, so they can mentally and emotionally prepare. Introduce the youth to the family member or other adult in a supervised setting. Accompany and support them during the visit. Make the first visit short and fun – and, if necessary, shorten visits to minimize stress and anxiety (my father’s birthday). Debrief after: Debrief after the meeting. Don’t minimize the complexity of a youth's post-visit feelings. Listen to and validate youth concerns and reactions, and recognize them as a part of the process. Adults cope with impermanence by building on an accrued sense of self-reliance and by anticipating and planning for a time of greater constancy. Teens in foster care have a backlog of painful memories to fall back on… (vs. RC: secure base)
  • Permanency PactYouth transitioning from foster care are often unsure who they can count on for ongoing support. Many of their significant relationships with adults have been based on professional connections which will terminate once the transition from care is completed. It is critical to the youth’s success to identify those adults who will continue to provide various supports through and beyond the transition from care. Clarifying exactly what the various supports will include can help to avoid gaps in the youth’s safety net and misunderstandings between the youth and the supportive adult(s).Suggested Supports include: a home for the holidays, a place to do laundry, emergency place to stay, food/occasional meals, care package at college, employment opportunity, job search assistance, career counseling, housing hunt, recreational activities, mentor, transportation, educational assistance, relationship counseling, assistance with medical issues, storage, motivation, someone to discuss problems with, a phone to use, a computer to use, clothing, spiritual support, legal advise, etc.Copies of the Permanency Pact for each of the adults who has indicated a willingness to provide support should be made for the youth and placed in the Health and Education Passport, a document distributed to youth when they age out of care.
  • It is critical to the youth’s success to identify those adults who will continue to provide various supports through and beyond the transition from care. Clarifying exactly what the various supports will include can help to avoid gaps in the youth’s safety net and misunderstandings between the youth and the supportive adult(s). Permanency PactYouth transitioning from foster care are often unsure who they can count on for ongoing support. Many of their significant relationships with adults have been based on professional connections which will terminate once the transition from care is completed. It is critical to the youth’s success to identify those adults who will continue to provide various supports through and beyond the transition from care. Clarifying exactly what the various supports will include can help to avoid gaps in the youth’s safety net and misunderstandings between the youth and the supportive adult(s).Suggested Supports include: a home for the holidays, a place to do laundry, emergency place to stay, food/occasional meals, care package at college, employment opportunity, job search assistance, career counseling, housing hunt, recreational activities, mentor, transportation, educational assistance, relationship counseling, assistance with medical issues, storage, motivation, someone to discuss problems with, a phone to use, a computer to use, clothing, spiritual support, legal advise, etc.Copies of the Permanency Pact for each of the adults who has indicated a willingness to provide support should be made for the youth and placed in the Health and Education Passport, a document distributed to youth when they age out of care.
  • Report out – White Board Life is made up of both choice and chance. The things we plan, and the unexpected. What we can/can’t control. We are responsible for our CHOICES re: how to respond. (“No pity” slide – no victims in this room, this room is filled with survivors) Youth will have a chance to cut out and assemble Life Dice during break Share my answers…
  • 2013 resources for transitional youth

    1. 1. Resources for youth transitioning from foster care to living on their own Partners for Forever Families Permanency Symposium, 2013
    2. 2. Life’s Transitions Do Not Happen Overnight Recommended Reading: Congressional Coalition on Adoption Institute’s 2012 Foster Youth Internship Report
    3. 3. Transition to Young Adulthood for for a young person with loving, involved parents
    4. 4. Transition to Young Adulthood for a foster care youth who “ages out”
    5. 5. Lack of Family Privilege
    6. 6. When the only legal “parent” you have is the state and federal government Foster Care Alumni of America’s “Culture of Foster Care” Postcard Project
    7. 7. When the only “parent” you have doesn’t always recognize their role Foster Care Alumni of America’s “Culture of Foster Care” Postcard Project
    8. 8. Federal Interventions to Improve Youth Outcomes
    9. 9. What’s an Exit Plan? *a.k.a. • “Discharge/Case-Closing Plan” • “Self-Sufficiency/Emancipation Plan” • “Transition Plan” • “Personalized Transition Plan”
    10. 10. Federal Legislation Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 Title II, Section 202 • Mandates that 90 days prior to emancipation from foster care, “a caseworker on the staff of the State agency, and, as appropriate, other representatives of the child provide the child with assistance and support in developing a transition plan that is personalized at the direction of the child, includes specific options on housing, health insurance, education, local opportunities for mentors and continuing support services, and work force supports and employment services, and is as detailed as the child may elect.”
    11. 11. Ohio Administrative Code • Ninety days prior to the youth’s emancipation from the agency’s custody, the PCSA or PCPA shall work with the youth to develop a final transition plan. • The plan shall be youth-driven and as detailed as the youth chooses.
    12. 12. I never knew I had an Exit Plan
    13. 13. Blindfold Activity
    14. 14. Involving Youth Voice in Plans for Their Future Foster Care Alumni of America’s “Culture of Foster Care” Postcard Project
    15. 15. Proactive response of the Ohio Supreme Court
    16. 16. Essential Elements:
    17. 17. “Name That Logo”
    18. 18. What are FUP Vouchers? Housing Choice Vouchers • “Youth 18-21 years old who left foster care after the age of 16 and lack adequate housing.” (Congress, Oct. 2000) • Requires local partnership between public housing authorities and public child welfare agencies.
    19. 19. Foster care youth voice in expanding Ohio Medicaid until age 21
    20. 20. • Eligibility: Under 21, in foster care on 18th birthday, received IV-E funding/services prior to age 18 • Application process: Caseworker submits a JFS 01958 form and Medicaid application OR youth reached out to Medicaid, identifying themselves as a former foster youth. • Maintaining coverage: Emancipated youth must report any changes in address, telephone number and email address to Ohio Medicaid Connecting and reconnecting foster care youth/alumni with Medicaid benefits
    21. 21. • FCASPL 183 (Ind. Living Transition Plans) • Family, Children, and Adult Services Procedure Letter No. 183, sent out by Director Lumpkin on October 5, 2009 • The plan must include a completed Medicaid application Ohio Policy and Procedure
    22. 22. Vital Documents: Prior to the youth’s emancipation from the agency’s custody, the PCSA or PCPA shall coordinate with the following agencies, to obtain necessary documents: • an original birth certificate • an original social security card • a current state identification card *OAC 5101:2-42-19: “Requirements for the provision of independent living services to youth in custody”
    23. 23. Life As A Juggling Act
    24. 24. Federal Legislation John H. Chafee Foster Care Independence Act Signed into law, December 1999 • Provides for flexible funding for distribution to States through grants for program services for youth • Provides opportunities for States to serve youth who are likely to remain in foster care and those who have aged out of foster care up to 21 years of age. • Provides States the option of allowing these young people to remain eligible for Medicaid up to age 21. • Enables older youth (18-21) to receive housing assistance if needed.
    25. 25. Educational Training Vouchers:
    26. 26. Definition of an “Independent Student” Three categories: • Student who is an orphan, in foster care, or a ward of the court, at any time when the student was 13 years of age or older • Student who is an emancipated minor or is in legal guardianship as determined by the court in their state of legal residence • Applicant is verified as an unaccompanied youth who is homeless or at risk of homelessness and self-supporting 2007 College Cost Reduction and Access Act
    27. 27. John H. Chafee Foster Care Independence Program Chafee funding can be used to pay for: •Housing (up to 30% of allocation) •College Textbooks •Transportation •Credit Recovery •All fees associated with GED, SAT, ACT •All fees associated with Post Secondary Education Enrollment •And more….
    28. 28. Benefits for eligible foster care youth • The ETV program is a federally-funded, state-administered program that provides grants up to $5,000 per year to assist former foster youth pursing higher education. • This includes college and vocational training institutions. • Funds can be used for: Tuition, books, textbooks, and living expenses. • To learn more, visit: ohio@statevoucher.org
    29. 29. Eligibility for ETV Funds A current, or former foster youth who: – Was in foster care on their 18th birthday and aged out at that time; OR – Was adopted from foster care with the adoption finalized AFTER his/her 16th birthday; OR – Will have his/her foster care case closed between the ages of 18 and 21. • At least 18, but younger than 21, to apply for the first time. • Already accepted or enrolled in a degree, certificate or other accredited program at a college, university, technical, vocational school. • To remain eligible for ETV funding, students must show progress toward a degree or certificate. • Students remain eligible for ETV up to age 23 if they received ETV funding prior to their 21st birthday.
    30. 30. Mission Statement: Ohio Reach improves post-secondary outcomes for foster care youth and alumni through advocacy, leadership, networking and empowerment.
    31. 31. Foster Care Alumni of America’s “Culture of Foster Care” Postcard Project Improving Outcomes; Changing the Odds
    32. 32. Empowering Youth to Plan for the Future
    33. 33. Federal Legislation Workforce Investment Act Signed into law in 1998 Workforce Investment Act (WIA) services support 9 of the 14 general categories that states are required by NYTD to support. Eligibility for Youth, Between Ages 14-21 • Deficient in basic literacy skills • Homeless • School Dropout • Ex-Offender • Runaway • Foster Child • Pregnant or Parenting
    34. 34. 1998 Workforce Investment Act WIA funds can be used for: • One-Stop Centers • Youth Service Programs (low-income, high risk) • Residential Training Programs like Job Corps
    35. 35. Workforce Connections:
    36. 36. Connecting the Dots Conference Suits For Success Resume Clinic
    37. 37. The Purple Project Founded by LaTasha Watts
    38. 38. Helping young people develop a vision for the future
    39. 39. B-E-G-I-N
    40. 40. Consumer Voice in the Process:
    41. 41. 1.) Allen 2.) Athens 3.) Cuyahoga 4.) Fairfield 5.) Franklin 6.) Greene 7.) Hamilton 8.) Lorain 9.) Lucas-NW 10.) Mahoning 11.) Montgomery 12.) Stark 13.) Summit
    42. 42. TAGyc Teen Advisory Group youth council
    43. 43. Interdependence Recommended Reading: Transitioning Youth: Blending the Worlds of Permanency and Independent Living. The Casey Center for Effective Child Welfare Practice. “The blending of the worlds of permanency and independent living Is imperative if our youth are ever to be adequately prepared for life, love and work in adulthood.”
    44. 44. Emerging from foster care to young adulthood: 1. Level of Preparation 2. Availability of a Safety Net
    45. 45. Who were the top three people in your Safety Net and why?
    46. 46. Copyright Lisa Dickson
    47. 47. Permanency Pact:
    48. 48. What exactly can I rely on you for? It is critical to the youth’s success to identify those adults who will continue to provide various supports through and beyond the transition from care. Clarifying exactly what the various supports will include can help to avoid gaps in the youth’s safety net and misunderstandings between the youth and the supportive adult(s). • A home for the holidays • A place to do laundry • An emergency place to stay • Care packages while in college • Storage • Someone to discuss problems with • A phone or computer to use
    49. 49. Life Dice
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