Success Beyond 18
A National Campaign of the
Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative
2
AT ISSUE
Choices we make about foster care today could deny young
people their best chance for a strong start at adultho...
3
THE CHALLENGE
Every year, 26,000 young people “age out” of foster care without
permanent families or supports.
Negative ...
4
THE OPPORTUNITY
Recent adolescent brain research shows we have a second
chance to help young people overcome adversity a...
5
States are expanding their services for young people beyond
age 18.
Now is the time to help them do it right and ensure ...
6
THE TIME IS RIGHT
FOR A CALL TO ACTION
The campaign’s three policy and practice goals:
1.  Young people are not on their...
7
EXTENDING CARE:
DOING IT RIGHT
Extending the availability and enhancing the quality of foster
care beyond age 18
•  Coll...
8
STATES THAT HAVE
EXTENDED FOSTER CARE
Approved Title IVE Plans
Alabama Arkansas California Illinois
Indiana Maine Maryla...
9
OUR SOLUTION
Success Beyond 18 will improve outcomes for young people
transitioning from foster care by:
1.  Increasing ...
10
OUR SUCCESSFUL APPROACH
Since 2001, the Jim Casey Initiative has built a movement.
We help achieve success for young pe...
11
JIM CASEY INITIATIVE
STATES
PARTNERSHIPS
CONNECTICUT DELAWARE FLORIDA
GEORGIA HAWAII INDIANA
IOWA MAINE MICHIGAN
MISSIS...
12
THE TIME IS NOW
“Every young person needs an opportunity to look up in the
stands and see somebody cheering for them.”
...
For more information, please contact:
[Lynn Tiede at ltiede@jimcaseyyouth.org
Fostering Connections:
Advocating for Improved
Outcomes for Older Youth
Nebraska and Pennsylvania
July 8, 2013
Setting the Context
Nebraska
•  State-administered
•  In 2011 served:
–  3,762 state wards
(1,261 of those in-home)
–  2,1...
Policy Issues
Nebraska
•  Gaps in existing
programs
•  Omaha pilot showed
good outcomes, but
additional health care,
housi...
Policy Issue – Pennsylvania
Options
PA
Pre-FCA
FCA
Options
De-Link Income Eligibility for Adoption Subsidy X X
Extend Adop...
NE – Communications
Message Box
Values: Nebraska is a state where we
take care of our kids and want them to
have a real op...
NE – Communications
•  Surveys and focus groups ! “Bridging the
Gap” report
•  Press conferences and youth lobby days
•  F...
PA – Communications
– Detailed fiscal analysis (Finance Project)
•  Use of state and local foster care and
payment data
• ...
PA – Fiscal Analysis
– Broad stakeholder group – involved youth
– Small working group to conduct analysis
– Cost Assumptio...
NE – Fiscal Analysis
•  Data from NE HHS
•  Broad stakeholder group decided program design options
•  Mainspring developed...
Questions?
•  Where do things stand in your state on this issue?
•  Is your state’s situation similar to NE or PA, or
some...
NE – Mobilization
•  Young people were the champions!
•  Partnership between NCFF/PE and
Appleseed
•  Jim Casey Youth Oppo...
PA – Mobilization
– Administration supportive but some counties
skeptical of fiscal analysis
– Juvenile Law Center and the...
NE – Government Affairs
•  NE HHS
–  Partnered in the fiscal analysis, but disputed
aspects of the legislative fiscal note...
PA – Government Affairs
– Gubernatorial advocacy – platform
– Convincing Administration – Program
Revision Request develop...
Questions?
•  What (tapped or untapped) champions exist in
your state?
•  How are young people involved?
•  What are the p...
NE – Resources
•  Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative
•  Nebraska Children & Families Foundation
•  Mainspring Consul...
PA – Resources
•  William Penn Foundation – Fiscal analysis
•  Casey Family Programs
•  Annie E. Casey Foundation –
Commun...
NE – Challenges and Successes
•  Successes: youth advocacy, stakeholder
involvement, strong partnerships, background
data,...
PA – Challenges and Successes
•  Navigating legislators interested in the
change…or who had already introduced
legislation...
Implementation
•  Key questions to consider:
–  Beyond creating eligibility to extend – what is the
combination of program...
Implementation
•  Implementation is equally important as the
statutory change and is an ongoing process.
•  A next frontie...
Advancing the Field
•  Change underscores the importance
government should place on ensuring the
long-term success of yout...
Advancing the Field – SPARC
•  Can provide the space for advocates to
dialogue and figure out the best strategies
to advan...
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Fostering Connections: Advocating for Improved Outcomes for Older Youth

  1. 1. Success Beyond 18 A National Campaign of the Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative
  2. 2. 2 AT ISSUE Choices we make about foster care today could deny young people their best chance for a strong start at adulthood. Let’s bring leaders together to help young people build better adult lives. We can build a state where all kids are safe, have a family, and have a chance to reach their potential.
  3. 3. 3 THE CHALLENGE Every year, 26,000 young people “age out” of foster care without permanent families or supports. Negative outcomes include: •  Homelessness •  Dropping out of high school •  Criminal involvement •  Unplanned pregnancies Estimated cost to taxpayers = $8 billion
  4. 4. 4 THE OPPORTUNITY Recent adolescent brain research shows we have a second chance to help young people overcome adversity and begin to thrive. The Fostering Connections Act makes it easier than ever for states to help young people have a strong start to adulthood. The time is right to build a better path
  5. 5. 5 States are expanding their services for young people beyond age 18. Now is the time to help them do it right and ensure that these young people are getting the same opportunities for success as their peers. THE OPPORTUNITY The time is right to build a better path
  6. 6. 6 THE TIME IS RIGHT FOR A CALL TO ACTION The campaign’s three policy and practice goals: 1.  Young people are not on their own at 18 without families or supports. 2.  Young people have a meaningful voice and say in their future. 3.  Greater accountability for their well-being leads to more positive outcomes. Doing it right has the power to change lives.
  7. 7. 7 EXTENDING CARE: DOING IT RIGHT Extending the availability and enhancing the quality of foster care beyond age 18 •  Collaborate with young people in designing extended care •  Leverage federal funding •  Take advantage of federal options (supervised independent living, allow for re-entry, voluntary agreements, direct stipends to young people) •  Maximize participation of young people in extended care (inclusive eligibility) •  Align extended care with approaches to case planning and oversight
  8. 8. 8 STATES THAT HAVE EXTENDED FOSTER CARE Approved Title IVE Plans Alabama Arkansas California Illinois Indiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Nebraska New York N. Dakota Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Washington W. Virginia Wash, DC Enacted legislation Delaware Florida Hawaii Missouri Nebraska Virginia
  9. 9. 9 OUR SOLUTION Success Beyond 18 will improve outcomes for young people transitioning from foster care by: 1.  Increasing public understanding of their needs. 2.  Mobilizing communities to take action to support them. 3.  Promoting improved policies and practices to increase their chances for success in adulthood. Leadership will pay off and things will get better .
  10. 10. 10 OUR SUCCESSFUL APPROACH Since 2001, the Jim Casey Initiative has built a movement. We help achieve success for young people leaving foster care through: •  Youth engagement •  Partnerships and resources •  Research, evaluation, and communications •  Public will and policy •  Increased opportunities for young people
  11. 11. 11 JIM CASEY INITIATIVE STATES PARTNERSHIPS CONNECTICUT DELAWARE FLORIDA GEORGIA HAWAII INDIANA IOWA MAINE MICHIGAN MISSISSIPPI NEBRASKA NEW MEXICO N. CAROLINA RHODE ISLAND TENESSEE
  12. 12. 12 THE TIME IS NOW “Every young person needs an opportunity to look up in the stands and see somebody cheering for them.” – Crystal, 25, Jim Casey Initiative Young Fellow Together, we can create a better path.
  13. 13. For more information, please contact: [Lynn Tiede at ltiede@jimcaseyyouth.org
  14. 14. Fostering Connections: Advocating for Improved Outcomes for Older Youth Nebraska and Pennsylvania July 8, 2013
  15. 15. Setting the Context Nebraska •  State-administered •  In 2011 served: –  3,762 state wards (1,261 of those in-home) –  2,164 non-court (291 of those out-of-home) •  CW privatization and JJ reform •  New HHS leadership •  “Front end” focus Pennsylvania •  County-administered •  In 2012 served: –  22k children in FC –  164k children in-home •  New administration •  Revenue-neutral public policy environment •  FCA passed in 2012
  16. 16. Policy Issues Nebraska •  Gaps in existing programs •  Omaha pilot showed good outcomes, but additional health care, housing and support needs Pennsylvania •  Had a financial disincentive to permanency – extended foster care to 21 under certain circumstances but subsidies ended at age 18 •  Could do more to promote youth permanency and successful transition from foster care •  Not maximizing new federal revenue
  17. 17. Policy Issue – Pennsylvania Options PA Pre-FCA FCA Options De-Link Income Eligibility for Adoption Subsidy X X Extend Adoption Subsidies from 18-21 X Guardianship Subsidies from 0-17 (relatives/kin) X X Extend Guardianship Subsidies from 18-21 (relatives/kin) X Re-entry into Foster Care from 18-21 X Extend Foster Care 18-21 when: •  Completing High School or GED X X •  Enrolled in Post-Secondary Education X X •  Participating in Employment Program X •  Employed for at Least 80 Hours a Month X •  Have Medical Condition X X
  18. 18. NE – Communications Message Box Values: Nebraska is a state where we take care of our kids and want them to have a real opportunity to be productive, healthy, and engaged members of the community as adults. Vision: Young people will have the support they need to be successful as they transition to adulthood. Ask: Take the opportunity under federal law to remove barriers for youth transitioning from foster care to adulthood by passing LB 216 and implementing the services and support program. Youth Voice
  19. 19. NE – Communications •  Surveys and focus groups ! “Bridging the Gap” report •  Press conferences and youth lobby days •  Fact sheets and packets •  Graphic and postcards •  Action alerts and social media •  Videos and profiles •  Radio, TV & print media/op-eds Find info at: neappleseed.org/children#lb216 (check out our prezi!)
  20. 20. PA – Communications – Detailed fiscal analysis (Finance Project) •  Use of state and local foster care and payment data •  County survey to inform assumptions •  Calculated youth and fiscal impact •  Find info at: http://bit.ly/c5zKW1 – White paper, op-eds, and e-advocacy •  Youth and families shared their stories in key districts – how they would benefit – Key messages: Existing disincentive, maximizing FCA will support better outcomes and is cheaper for the state and counties
  21. 21. PA – Fiscal Analysis – Broad stakeholder group – involved youth – Small working group to conduct analysis – Cost Assumptions: • Number of extended subsidies • Number served in care ages 18-20 with current and expanded eligibility • Number re-entering care • Costs for administration, case management, legal representation, and placement settings • Cost savings due to increased permanency • Costs if PA doesn’t enact FCA
  22. 22. NE – Fiscal Analysis •  Data from NE HHS •  Broad stakeholder group decided program design options •  Mainspring developed projections of: –  Net fiscal impact of extending care in NE based on the cost assumptions (estimates based on design options) –  Potential state savings –  Expected new IV-E revenue (where NE could draw down for current investments) –  Assumptions: caseload, placement, case management, case review, supportive services, extended guardianship and adoption subsidies, and revenue •  Estimated new state cost: $2.7 - 3.1 million in 2013 growing to $4.4 - 5.9 in 2017, depending on design option* •  Other cost avoidance * Note that the age of majority is 19 in NE
  23. 23. Questions? •  Where do things stand in your state on this issue? •  Is your state’s situation similar to NE or PA, or something different? •  What challenges or successes has your state experienced? •  Were you surprised that PA’s program was estimated to generate revenue and produce a cost savings? (Yes, you heard that correctly!)
  24. 24. NE – Mobilization •  Young people were the champions! •  Partnership between NCFF/PE and Appleseed •  Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative and Mainspring Consulting •  Older youth stakeholder group
  25. 25. PA – Mobilization – Administration supportive but some counties skeptical of fiscal analysis – Juvenile Law Center and the Administration were key partners – Previous advocacy of youth helped pave way – youth sign-on to the administration – Worked closely with champions – Mobilized organizations/counties to communicate support – Resource family and youth sign-on – E-advocacy message to legislature
  26. 26. NE – Government Affairs •  NE HHS –  Partnered in the fiscal analysis, but disputed aspects of the legislative fiscal note (which was based on the fiscal analysis) –  Testified in opposition at committee hearing (based on cost but acknowledging the program as a best practice) •  Limited state general fund dollars for the floor and competing priorities •  Multiple amendments
  27. 27. PA – Government Affairs – Gubernatorial advocacy – platform – Convincing Administration – Program Revision Request development to support Gov s budget development – Administration was on lookout for cost- savings ( waste, fraud and abuse ) – Fine tuning of analysis/proposal – penetration rate – Shepherding the budget proposal – Champion in appropriations
  28. 28. Questions? •  What (tapped or untapped) champions exist in your state? •  How are young people involved? •  What are the political dynamics?
  29. 29. NE – Resources •  Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative •  Nebraska Children & Families Foundation •  Mainspring Consulting •  The Sherwood Foundation •  William and Ruth Scott Family Foundation •  Other partners: Foster Care Review Office, Court Improvement Project, CASA, providers and other advocates, judges, senators and legislative staff, and NE HHS
  30. 30. PA – Resources •  William Penn Foundation – Fiscal analysis •  Casey Family Programs •  Annie E. Casey Foundation – Communications strategy and KIDS COUNT •  Finance Project/Mainspring Consulting •  FCA National Resource Center •  PPC s Leadership Council •  Hornby-Zeller Associates
  31. 31. NE – Challenges and Successes •  Successes: youth advocacy, stakeholder involvement, strong partnerships, background data, effective communications •  Remaining challenges: implementation, rules and regs, other reforms, broadening eligibility •  Implementation: Before Jan. 1, 2014 NE HHS creates rules and regs Oct. 15, 2013 NE HHS submits SPA Within 60-90 days of SPA approval (not before Jan. 1, 2014) Program takes effect July 1, 2013 Advisory Committee formed Oct. 1, 2013 Advisory Committee makes initial recommendations
  32. 32. PA – Challenges and Successes •  Navigating legislators interested in the change…or who had already introduced legislation. •  Keeping proposal under wraps so Governor would get the credit •  Fiscal analysis – effective but difficult •  Strong proposal – No strong opposition •  State commitment to go further than FCA
  33. 33. Implementation •  Key questions to consider: –  Beyond creating eligibility to extend – what is the combination of programming, practice and philosophy that might encourage youth to take advantage of FCA? •  Beyond connecting youth to concrete services to meet basic needs – how can the program help youth connect to supportive relationships and permanency, and to effective transition services so the program doesn’t simply extend the cliff to age 21? –  How can you broaden the placement options and continuum for young adults? –  How can you relax certain policies to allow for age- appropriate freedoms and responsibilities? –  Is there a need for a culture shift related to the professionals and implementing FCA?
  34. 34. Implementation •  Implementation is equally important as the statutory change and is an ongoing process. •  A next frontier in PA is broadening the definition of supervised independent living settings to draw down new funds under FCA and create a broader continuum of placement options. •  The next frontier in NE involves fleshing out the program, training, outreach and oversight.
  35. 35. Advancing the Field •  Change underscores the importance government should place on ensuring the long-term success of youth transitioning to permanency and from care. •  Provides the opportunity to consider a different way of serving young adults in foster care. •  Incorporates brain development research
  36. 36. Advancing the Field – SPARC •  Can provide the space for advocates to dialogue and figure out the best strategies to advance and implement FCA in their respective jurisdictions. •  Can serve as a source and conduit of information and technical assistance. •  Can create peer opportunities between state advocates who are engaged in similar work to advance FCA and other issues.

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