2012 Ohio CASA Conference

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OHIO Youth Advisory Board presentation on “Awareness of Resources to Support Foster Care Teens & Youth Preparing to Emancipate from Care” shared during the 2012 Ohio CASA Conference.

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  • Introductions: NameCounty / Agency you represent What does this picture make you think of?
  • Wouldn’t it be great if we planned for these things ahead of time. It’s wise to have an exit strategy. One tool = a 90-day exit plan. Its definition and purpose
  • Preparing youth for the future – this is not an OPTION, this is FEDERAL LAW The Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 outlines federal requirements regarding essential elements to be covered in the development of a 90-day transition plan.
  • STATE LAW The reason that the Youth Developed Discharge Plan is being piloted (in five Ohio counties) is because Ohio youth have reported NOT being provided with / involved in the development of a 90-day transition plan. “ The goal of an exit plan is to identify anticipated service needs for older youth who are in the process of transitioning out of foster care. Youth who have a comprehensive transition plan are better equipped to transition successfully from foster care to self-sufficiency. An unintended consequence of not preparing youth to exit from foster care is the youth becoming homeless.” (Missouri Dept. of Social Services)
  • Youth Access to Vital Documentation The Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 outlines federal requirements regarding essential elements to be covered in the development of a 90-day transition plan. Both federal law and Ohio Administrative Code require that prior to the youth’s emancipated from foster care, they need to receive ORIGINALS (not copies) of these three documents. What Other Documentation Might Help? Letter of Verification of Dependency Immunization records Free credit report (www.annualcreditreport.com) Tribal information when applicable Death Certificates of parents, when applicable Information on registering to vote Information to males to sign up for the selective services (30 days prior to 18 or 30 days after 18) Information on any existing court fees associated with the youth’s name prior to emancipation.
  • Youth Access to Vital Documentation The Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 outlines federal requirements regarding essential elements to be covered in the development of a 90-day transition plan. Both federal law and Ohio Administrative Code require that prior to the youth’s emancipated from foster care, they need to receive ORIGINALS (not copies) of these three documents. What Other Documentation Might Help? Letter of Verification of Dependency Immunization records Free credit report (www.annualcreditreport.com) Tribal information when applicable Death Certificates of parents, when applicable Information on registering to vote Information to males to sign up for the selective services (30 days prior to 18 or 30 days after 18) Information on any existing court fees associated with the youth’s name prior to emancipation.
  • Youth JFS PROCEDURAL LETTER Immunization Record - complete and up to date; •Health Records and Medical Card - allergies, hospitalizations, treatments,medications; list of all past medical exams with diagnoses (if there are any), childhood diseases; Medicaid Resources for Emancipated Foster Youth Since 2007, foster care youth who "age out" of foster care in Ohio are eligible for Medicaid until their 21st birthday.  ODJFS recently obtained data that shows very poor enrollment of these youth in Medicaid.  ODJFS recently provided training to county children service agencies to inform them of the procedures required to transition a child to the adult Medicaid program.  Click here and here for general Medicaid to 21 resources provided at the training.  Below is an overview of the forms required: Enrolling in Medicaid : The child's caseworker must complete three separate forms in order to enroll them into the adult Medicaid program. Referral For Medicaid Continuing Eligibility Review: JFS 01958 Combined Program Application: JFS 07216 Consumer Rights and Responsibilities: JFS 07236 All three forms must be completed in order for the enrollment to be processed. Maintaining Coverage Until Age 21 : If youth don't stay in touch with Medicaid, they will lose services at age 19 or 20. This is because Medicaid eligibility must be verified each year. Therefore, it is vitally important for emancipated youth to notify Ohio Medicaid whenever they change their residence, phone number, and/or email address. For Additional Support, Please Contact: Medicaid Hotline: (800) 324-8680 Medicaid email address: [email_address]
  • What’s your role?
  • Asking the right questions
  • 2012 Ohio CASA Conference

    1. 1. Resources to Support Foster Care Youth in Their Transition to Adulthood Ohio Youth Advisory Board 2012 Ohio CASA Conference
    2. 2. Overcoming Hurdles in Ohio (O.H.I.O.)The OHIO Youth Advisory Boardexists to be the knowledgeablestatewide voice that influencespolicies and practices that effect allyouth who have or will experience outof home care.
    3. 3. Plunging into young adulthood,without family support
    4. 4. Lacking family privilege
    5. 5. Lacking consistency in terms of supportPoint of Transition HousingBetween Youth andAdult Systems Vocational Rehabilitation Substance AbuseJuvenile Justice Criminal JusticeSpecial EducationChild WelfareChild Mental Health Adult Mental Health Disconnection
    6. 6. Housing outcomes for our young people, without supportPercentage of foster care youth whoreport experiencing homelessness after“aging out” of care: ____Percentage of homeless adults whospent time in foster care as children:____Percentage of Chafee funds thatcounties can use for funds for housingfor emancipated foster youth: ____
    7. 7. Housing outcomes for our young people, without supportPercentage of foster care youth whoreport experiencing homelessness after“aging out” of care: 20% (one in five)Percentage of homeless adults whospent time in foster care as children:25% (one in four)Percentage of Chafee funds thatcounties can use for funds for housingfor emancipated foster youth: 30%
    8. 8. Higher Education outcomes for our young people, without supportPercentage of foster care youth whoexpress a desire to attend college: ____Percentage of foster youth who areenrolled in college prep courses: ____Percentage of foster youth whograduate from college: ____
    9. 9. Higher Education outcomes for our young people, without supportPercentage of foster care youth whoexpress a desire to attend college: 75%Percentage of foster youth who areenrolled in college prep courses: 15%Percentage of foster youth whograduate from college: Less than 2%
    10. 10. How can CASA volunteersadvocate to keep youth afloat?
    11. 11. What’s an ExitPlan?*a.k.a.• “Discharge/Case-Closing Plan”• “Self-Sufficiency/Emancipation Plan”• “Transition Plan”• “Personalized Transition Plan”
    12. 12. Federal Legislation Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 Title II, Section 202• Mandates that 90 days prior to emancipation from foster care, “a caseworker on the staff of the State agency, and, as appropriate, other representatives of the child provide the child with assistance and support in developing a transition plan that is personalized at the direction of the child, includes specific options on housing, health insurance, education, local opportunities for mentors and continuing support services, and work force supports and employment services, and is as detailed as the child may elect.”
    13. 13. Ohio Administrative CodeNinety days prior to the youth’s emancipation from theagency’s custody, the PCSA or PCPA shall work with theyouth to develop a final transition plan.The plan shall be youth-driven and as detailed as theyouth chooses.
    14. 14. Vital DocumentsPrior to the youth’s emancipation from the agency’s custody,the PCSA or PCPA shall coordinate with the followingagencies, to obtain necessary documents:an original birth certificatean original social security carda current state identification card*OAC 5101:2-42-19: “Requirements for theprovision of independent living services to youth incustody”
    15. 15. Essential Elements• Post-Emancipation Services (if available)• Healthcare; insurance, power of attorney• Higher Ed; secondary, post-secondary• Housing; obtaining, paying for• Budgeting; credit report• Selective Services (males must register)• Existing Court Fees (preexisting)• Existing Benefits; i.e. Social Security
    16. 16. Healthcare for Emancipated Youth• FCASPL 183 (Ind. Living Transition Plans)• Family, Children, and Adult Services Procedure Letter No. 183, sent out by Director Lumpkin on October 5, 2009• The plan must include a completed Medicaid application
    17. 17. Know Your Role
    18. 18. Resources you can advocate for: “Name That Logo”
    19. 19. Asking the Right Questions…
    20. 20. WIA One-Stop CentersWIA funds can be used to pay for:• Job readiness, ongoing job skill inventory,improvement and support• Balancing a checkbook, using the ATM,creating a budget• Tutoring, credit recovery, and test preparation• Tuition at colleges, universities, and certifiedtrade schools• And more… (i.e. tattoo removal) 1998 Workforce Investment Act
    21. 21. Definition of an “Independent Student”Three categories:• Student who is an orphan, in foster care, or a ward of the court, at any time when the student was 13 years of age or older• Student who is an emancipated minor or is in legal guardianship as determined by the court in their state of legal residence• Applicant is verified as an unaccompanied youth who is homeless or at risk of homelessness and self-supporting2007 College Cost Reduction and Access Act
    22. 22. Benefits for eligible foster care youth• The ETV program is a federally-funded, state-administered program that provides grants up to $5,000 per year to assist former foster youth pursing higher education.• This includes college and vocational training institutions.• Funds can be used for: Tuition, books, textbooks, and living expenses.• To learn more, visit: ohio@statevoucher.org
    23. 23. Eligibility for ETV FundsA current, or former foster youth who: – Was in foster care on their 18th birthday and aged out at that time; OR – Was adopted from foster care with the adoption finalized AFTER his/her 16th birthday; OR – Will have his/her foster care case closed between the ages of 18 and 21.• At least 18, but younger than 21, to apply for the first time.• Already accepted or enrolled in a degree, certificate or other accredited program at a college, university, technical, vocational school.• To remain eligible for ETV funding, students must show progress toward a degree or certificate.• Students remain eligible for ETV up to age 23 if they received ETV funding prior to their 21st birthday.
    24. 24. John H. Chafee Foster Care Independence ProgramChafee funding can be used to pay for:•Housing (up to 30% of allocation)•College Textbooks•Transportation•Credit Recovery•All fees associated with GED, SAT, ACT•All fees associated with Post SecondaryEducation Enrollment•And more….
    25. 25. Who can we depend on?
    26. 26. Who are the people of importancein each young person’s life?
    27. 27. Permanency Pact
    28. 28. Permanency Pact It is critical to the youth’s success to identify those adults who will continue to provide various supports through and beyond the transition from care. Clarifying exactly what the various supports will include can help to avoid gaps in the youth’s safety net and misunderstandings between the youth and the supportive adult(s). • A home for the holidays • A place to do laundry • An emergency place to stay • Care packages while in college • Storage • Someone to discuss problems with • A phone or computer to use

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