Japan vs. The United States
December 7, 1941
Japan Invades French Indochina 1941
Japanese Leaders
• Hideki Tojo • Emperor Hirohito
Admiral Yamamoto
Admiral Nagumo
Pearl Harbor-December 7, 1941
Pearl Harbor
USS Arizona Memorial
• The names of the
Arizona’s dead are
engraved on this white
marble wall at the
memorial.
•
Pearl Harbor Today
West Oahu
Pearl Harbor
Pearl Harbor Propaganda
Remember Pearl Harbor
• This was one of the
most patriotic songs
during World War II.
It was played at family
and religiou...
December 8, 1941
FDR’s War Speech
• FDR’s War Speech
Backdoor to War Conspiracy
Causes of WWII
• In Europe:
– Treaty of Versailles
– The Great Depression
– Hitler’s actions in the 1930’s
– Mussolini’s a...
• In Asia
– The Great Depression
– Japanese invasion of Manchuria in 1931
– Japanese invasion of China in 1937
• For the United States
– Quit trading supplies(oil) with Japan in the
summer of 1941
– Tough policies towards Japan in Fa...
Effects of WWII on US
• stimulated economy
– 17 million new jobs created
– average wages increased 30%
– middle class grea...
• German Nazi party was completely destroyed
and Germany was broken up into 4 zones
• Japanese cities were destroyed from ...
Casablanca Conference-January 1942
“Unconditional Surrender”
North African Campaign
• Took place in North Africa from June, 1940 to
May, 1943
• Took place in the Libyan and Egyptian d...
Operation Torch-November 1942
Landing in Morroco
Erwin Rommel-The Desert Fox-
German General
Bernard Montgomery-Monty-British General
Dwight Eisenhower-US General
George Patton-US General
• What did the victory in Africa open the door
for the Allied Powers to do next?
• Why not invade France next?
• “Soft und...
Invasion of Sicily-July/August 1943
Sicily
Sicily
USS Robert Rowan Hit-Invasion of Sicily
Invasion of Italy-September 1943
Fighting in Italy’s Appenine Mts.
Italy
Tuskegee Institute/Airmen
Operation Overlord
The Atlantic Wall
Dwight Eisenhower
Ike, Patton and Bradley
D-Day Facts
• June 6, 1944
• The D in D-Day stands for “day” since the final
invasion date was unknown and weather
depende...
• 5,000 ships and landing craft
50,000 vehicles
11,000 planes
• Major Generals:
– United States – Dwight D. Eisenhower, Om...
• By June 11, with the beachheads firmly
secured
• More than 326,000 troops had crossed with
more than 100,000 tons of mil...
Battle of the Bulge
BATTLE FACTS
 The coldest, snowiest weather “in memory” in the Ardennes
Forest on the German/Belgium border.
 Over a mil...
V-E Day May 8, 1945
Go to Japan Powerpoint
US Homefront
Selective Training and Service Act
1940
• First peacetime draft in US History
• Used until 1973 to fill military needs
• A...
War Production
National War Labor Board
War Finance Committee and War Bonds
• Over the course of the
war 85 million Americans
purchased bonds totaling
approximate...
Women in WWII
• Rosie the Riveter
-represented women
workers in WWII
WAVES-Women’s Navy
WASP-Women’s Army Service Pilots
WASP
“Tokyo Rose” Iva Toguri
• forced to broadcast
propaganda to the Allied
troops for Japan.
• In these radio programs,
she ta...
African-Americans in WWII
Asian Americans in WWII
Hollywood in WWII
» Soliders waiting in line to see I Wanted Wings (1941).
• The Captain (Cary Grant) speaks to his men about the death of
Mike in Destination Tokyo.
Casablanca
Bob Hope
and the USO Tour
Bob Hope
Bing Crosby
John Wayne
OPA and Rationing
• The Office of Price Administration was established in 1941 under Leon Henderson to
administer price co...
Rationing
Front Cover
Back cover
• The following is a set of instructions that came with every book:
Your first ration book has been issued to you, origina...
• 8) When you buy any rationed product, the proper stamp must be detached in the presence of the storekeeper, his
employee...
War Production Board
People standing in line for sugar
The Holocaust
• The genocide of approximately six million European Jews
during World War II
• A program of systematic stat...
Who was inferior according to Hitler?
1. Jews(6 million dead)
2. Gypsies(500,000 to 1.5 million)
3. mentally/physically ha...
What is the Aryan Race?
• misused by the Nazis to mean a so-called
master race that originated around Germany
• perfect Ar...
Lebensborn-Fount of Life
• The program aimed to promote the growth of
"superior" Aryan populations by providing excellent
...
Hitler’s Jewish Question
1933
• Nazis "temporarily" suspend civil liberties for all
citizens in 1933-Never restored.
• The...
Nuremburg Laws 1935
1. Took away German citizenship from Jews thus making Jews
second class citizens by removing their bas...
1936
• Nazis boycott Jewish-owned businesses
Kristallnacht-1938
“Night of the Broken Glass”
• On the nights of November 9 and 10, 1938, gangs of
Nazi youth roamed thro...
Kristallnacht
Kristallnacht
1938-Cont.
• All Jewish children are expelled from public
schools in Germany and Austria.
• Nazis take control of Jewish-o...
1939
• Hitler orders the
systematic murder of
the mentally and
physically disabled in
Germany and Austria
• Jews are requi...
1940
• Nazis begin deporting
German Jews to Poland
• Jews are forced into
ghettos
• Nazis begin the first
mass murder of J...
1941
• Jews throughout Eastern Europe are forced
into ghettos
• In two days, German units shoot 33,771
Ukrainian Jews at B...
1942
• Nazi officials announce "Final Solution"- their plan to
kill all European Jews
• Five death camps begin operation i...
1943
• Jews in the Warsaw Ghetto resist as the Nazis
begin new rounds of deportations. These Jews
hold out for nearly a mo...
1944
• Hitler takes over Hungary and begins
deporting 12,000 Hungarian Jews each day to
Auschwitz where they are murdered
1945
• Hitler is defeated and World War II ends in
Europe.
• The Holocaust is over and the death camps
are emptied.
• Many...
1947
• The United Nations establishes a Jewish
homeland in British- controlled Palestine,
which becomes the State of Israe...
Auschwitz
Nazi Death Camps
Why did the US and Allies Win WWII?
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Japan vs

  1. 1. Japan vs. The United States December 7, 1941
  2. 2. Japan Invades French Indochina 1941
  3. 3. Japanese Leaders • Hideki Tojo • Emperor Hirohito
  4. 4. Admiral Yamamoto
  5. 5. Admiral Nagumo
  6. 6. Pearl Harbor-December 7, 1941
  7. 7. Pearl Harbor
  8. 8. USS Arizona Memorial • The names of the Arizona’s dead are engraved on this white marble wall at the memorial. •
  9. 9. Pearl Harbor Today West Oahu Pearl Harbor
  10. 10. Pearl Harbor Propaganda
  11. 11. Remember Pearl Harbor • This was one of the most patriotic songs during World War II. It was played at family and religious gatherings throughout the country. • Song
  12. 12. December 8, 1941
  13. 13. FDR’s War Speech • FDR’s War Speech
  14. 14. Backdoor to War Conspiracy
  15. 15. Causes of WWII • In Europe: – Treaty of Versailles – The Great Depression – Hitler’s actions in the 1930’s – Mussolini’s actions in the 1930’s – Failure of the League of Nations – Policy of Appeasement – Hitler’s invasion of Poland – Rise of nationalism
  16. 16. • In Asia – The Great Depression – Japanese invasion of Manchuria in 1931 – Japanese invasion of China in 1937
  17. 17. • For the United States – Quit trading supplies(oil) with Japan in the summer of 1941 – Tough policies towards Japan in Fall 1941 – Pearl Harbor attack
  18. 18. Effects of WWII on US • stimulated economy – 17 million new jobs created – average wages increased 30% – middle class greatly expanded • federal power during the war increased – shifted from state laws to federal laws- important during civil rights era and Vietnam war • women involved in the workforce • more rights for African Americans- integrated troops
  19. 19. • German Nazi party was completely destroyed and Germany was broken up into 4 zones • Japanese cities were destroyed from bombing and Japan was placed under military rule • Most deaths ever in a war • United Nations starts • Major Powers of the world were discovered • Cold War-US vs USSR
  20. 20. Casablanca Conference-January 1942 “Unconditional Surrender”
  21. 21. North African Campaign • Took place in North Africa from June, 1940 to May, 1943 • Took place in the Libyan and Egyptian deserts also in Morocco, Algeria and ended in Tunisia • The campaign was fought between the Allies(GB, France, US) and Axis Powers(Germany(Afrika Corps), Italy, Vichy French) • The area was in conflict due to colonial interests dating back to the late 1800’s • The United States began direct military assistance in North Africa in May, 1942
  22. 22. Operation Torch-November 1942
  23. 23. Landing in Morroco
  24. 24. Erwin Rommel-The Desert Fox- German General
  25. 25. Bernard Montgomery-Monty-British General
  26. 26. Dwight Eisenhower-US General
  27. 27. George Patton-US General
  28. 28. • What did the victory in Africa open the door for the Allied Powers to do next? • Why not invade France next? • “Soft underbelly of Europe” Winston Churchill • Operation Husky(Invasion of Sicily-July/August 1943) and Operation Avalanche(Invasion of Italy) were next • Operation Husky is what let to Mussolini losing his power in Italy in July 1943
  29. 29. Invasion of Sicily-July/August 1943
  30. 30. Sicily
  31. 31. Sicily
  32. 32. USS Robert Rowan Hit-Invasion of Sicily
  33. 33. Invasion of Italy-September 1943
  34. 34. Fighting in Italy’s Appenine Mts.
  35. 35. Italy
  36. 36. Tuskegee Institute/Airmen
  37. 37. Operation Overlord
  38. 38. The Atlantic Wall
  39. 39. Dwight Eisenhower
  40. 40. Ike, Patton and Bradley
  41. 41. D-Day Facts • June 6, 1944 • The D in D-Day stands for “day” since the final invasion date was unknown and weather dependent • 156,000 Allied troops from the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, Free France and Norway • The Allied code names for the beaches along the 50-mile stretch of Normandy coast targeted for landing were Utah, Omaha, Gold, Juno and Sword. • Omaha was the costliest beach in terms of Allied casualties.
  42. 42. • 5,000 ships and landing craft 50,000 vehicles 11,000 planes • Major Generals: – United States – Dwight D. Eisenhower, Omar Bradley – The United Kingdom – Bernard Law Montgomery – Germany – Erwin Rommel • Casualties: – United States – 6,603 (1,465 killed) – United Kingdom – 2,700 – Canada – 1,074 (359 fatal) – Germany – Estimated between 4,000 – 9,000
  43. 43. • By June 11, with the beachheads firmly secured • More than 326,000 troops had crossed with more than 100,000 tons of military equipment • Paris was liberated on August 25 • Germany surrendered on May 8, 1945. • But not before……..
  44. 44. Battle of the Bulge
  45. 45. BATTLE FACTS  The coldest, snowiest weather “in memory” in the Ardennes Forest on the German/Belgium border.  Over a million men, 500,000 Germans, 600,000 Americans (more than fought at Gettysburg) and 55,000 British.  100,000 German casualties, killed, wounded or captured.  81,000 American casualties, including 23,554 captured and 19,000 killed.  1,400 British casualties 200 killed.  800 tanks lost on each side, 1,000 German aircraft.  The Malmedy Massacre, where 86 American soldiers were murdered, was the worst atrocity committed against American troops during the course of the war in Europe.  In it's entirety, the “Battle of the Bulge,” was the worst battles- in terms of losses - to the American Forces in WWII.
  46. 46. V-E Day May 8, 1945
  47. 47. Go to Japan Powerpoint
  48. 48. US Homefront
  49. 49. Selective Training and Service Act 1940 • First peacetime draft in US History • Used until 1973 to fill military needs • After 1973, US military depended on volunteers to fill needs
  50. 50. War Production
  51. 51. National War Labor Board
  52. 52. War Finance Committee and War Bonds • Over the course of the war 85 million Americans purchased bonds totaling approximately $185 billion • Helped pay for the war • It was an investment for US citizens • As low as $18.75 per bond • ten years later gov’t paid out $25
  53. 53. Women in WWII • Rosie the Riveter -represented women workers in WWII
  54. 54. WAVES-Women’s Navy
  55. 55. WASP-Women’s Army Service Pilots
  56. 56. WASP
  57. 57. “Tokyo Rose” Iva Toguri • forced to broadcast propaganda to the Allied troops for Japan. • In these radio programs, she taunted the troops and played music from home. • She was a US citizen in Japan • Convicted of treason
  58. 58. African-Americans in WWII
  59. 59. Asian Americans in WWII
  60. 60. Hollywood in WWII » Soliders waiting in line to see I Wanted Wings (1941).
  61. 61. • The Captain (Cary Grant) speaks to his men about the death of Mike in Destination Tokyo.
  62. 62. Casablanca
  63. 63. Bob Hope and the USO Tour
  64. 64. Bob Hope
  65. 65. Bing Crosby
  66. 66. John Wayne
  67. 67. OPA and Rationing • The Office of Price Administration was established in 1941 under Leon Henderson to administer price controls that began in the summer of 1941. • 8000 rationing boards were created with 200,000 volunteers to assist the 60,000 employees of the agency. • Food rationing included restrictions on sugar and meat; clothing rationing restricted silk and nylon. • Gasoline rationing began in May 1942 on the East coast, limiting use to five gallons per week. • By the end of 1942, half of the nation's automobiles were issued an A sticker, allowing 4 gallons per week. • The other half of automobiles had either a B sticker (supplementary allowance for war workers) or a C sticker (vital occupation such as doctor). • Truckers had a T sticker for unlimited amounts. • A black market developed in stolen or counterfeit stickers that were used in 5-30% of gasoline sales. • By 1945, there were 32,500 motorists arrested for using such false stickers, 1300 convictions, 4000 gas stations closed.
  68. 68. Rationing Front Cover
  69. 69. Back cover
  70. 70. • The following is a set of instructions that came with every book: Your first ration book has been issued to you, originally containing 28 war ration stamps. Other books may be issued at later dates. The following instructions apply to your first book and will apply to any later books, unless otherwise ordered by the Office of Price administration. In order to obtain a later book, the first book must be turned in. You should preserve War Rations Books with the greatest possible care. 1) From the time the Office of Price Administration may issue orders rationing certain products. After the dates indicated by such orders, these products can be purchased only through the use of War rations Books containing valid War Ration Stamps. 2) The orders of the Office of Price Administration will designate the stamps to be used for the purchase of a particular rationed product, the period during which each of these stamps may be used, and the amounts which may be bought with each stamp. 3) Stamps become valid for use only when and as directed by the Orders of the Office of Price Administration. 4) Unless otherwise announced, the Ration Week is from Saturday midnight to the following Saturday midnight. 5) War Ration stamps may be used in any retail store in the United States. 6) War Ration Stamps may be used only by or for the person named and described in the War Ration Book. 7) Every person must see that this War Ration Book is kept in a safe place and properly used. Parents are responsible for the safekeeping and use of their children's War Ration Book.
  71. 71. • 8) When you buy any rationed product, the proper stamp must be detached in the presence of the storekeeper, his employee, or the person making the delivery on his behalf. If a stamp is torn out of the War Ration Book in any other way than above indicated, it becomes void. If a stamp is partly torn or mutilated and more than one half of it remains in the book, it is valid. Otherwise it becomes void. 9) If your War Ration Book is lost, destroyed, stolen or mutilated, you should report that fact to the local Ration Board. 10) If you enter a hospital, or other institution, and expect to be there for more than 10 days, you must turn your War Ration Book over to the person in charge. It will be returned to you upon your request when you leave. 11) When a person dies, his War Ration Book must be returned to the local Ration Board, in accordance with the regulations. 12) If you have any complaints, questions, or difficulties regarding your War Ration Book, consult your local Ration Board. NOTE The first stamps in War Ration Book One will be used for the purchase of sugar. When this book was issued, the registrar asked you, or the person who applied for your book, how much sugar you owned on that date. If you had any sugar, you were allowed to keep it, but stamps representing this quantity were torn from your group (except for a small amount which you were allowed to keep without loosing any stamps). If your War Ration Book one was issued to you on application by a member of your family, the number of stamps torn from the books of the family was based on the amount of sugar owned by the family, and was divided as equally as possible among all the books.
  72. 72. War Production Board
  73. 73. People standing in line for sugar
  74. 74. The Holocaust • The genocide of approximately six million European Jews during World War II • A program of systematic state-sponsored extermination by Nazi Germany throughout Nazi-occupied territory • Approximately two-thirds of the population of nine million Jews who had lived in Europe before the Holocaust died • Some say that the definition of the Holocaust should also include the Nazis' killing of millions of people in other groups from Germany and other occupied territory • By this definition, the total number of Holocaust victims would be between 11 million and 17 million people
  75. 75. Who was inferior according to Hitler? 1. Jews(6 million dead) 2. Gypsies(500,000 to 1.5 million) 3. mentally/physically handicapped people(75,000 to 250,000) 4. Soviet Slavs/POW’s/Troops-(16.5 million)The Russian Academy of Science in 1995 reported civilian victims in the USSR, including Jews, at German hands totaled 13.7 million dead including 7.4 million victims of Nazi genocide, 2.2 million deaths of persons deported to Germany for forced labor; and 4.1 million famine and disease deaths in occupied territory. German captors killed an estimated 2.8 million Soviet POWs through starvation, exposure, and execution 5. Poles(2.5 million dead) 6. Homosexuals(5-15 thousand dead) 7. communists/socialists(many but number not confirmed) 8. dark skinned people(death and forced sterilization) 9. mixed races-"The mulatto children came about through rape or the white mother was a whore," Adolf Hitler 10. Jehovah’s Witnesses(2,500-5,000)
  76. 76. What is the Aryan Race? • misused by the Nazis to mean a so-called master race that originated around Germany • perfect Aryan was blonde, blue-eyed, tall and muscular. • The original term refers to a people speaking a Indo-European dialect.
  77. 77. Lebensborn-Fount of Life • The program aimed to promote the growth of "superior" Aryan populations by providing excellent health care and living conditions to women and by restricting access to those deemed “fit” • Houses were set up throughout Germany and many occupied territories • Many Lebensborn children were born to unwed mothers which helped lead to many rumors of rape. • Contrary to widespread rumors, women were not forced to have relations with Aryan Germans
  78. 78. Hitler’s Jewish Question 1933 • Nazis "temporarily" suspend civil liberties for all citizens in 1933-Never restored. • The Nazis set up the first concentration camp at Dachau in 1933. The first inmates are 200 Communists. • Jews are prohibited from working as civil servants, doctors in the National Health Service, and teachers in public high schools. All but few Jewish students are banned from public high schools and colleges.
  79. 79. Nuremburg Laws 1935 1. Took away German citizenship from Jews thus making Jews second class citizens by removing their basic civil rights. 2. established membership in the Jewish race as being anyone who either considered themselves Jewish or had three or four Jewish grandparents. People with one or two Jewish grandparents were considered to be mixed race. - eventually anyone with at least one Jewish grandparent was at risk in Nazi Germany 3. Jews could only marry Jews 4. No sexual relations between non-Jewish Germans and Jews
  80. 80. 1936 • Nazis boycott Jewish-owned businesses
  81. 81. Kristallnacht-1938 “Night of the Broken Glass” • On the nights of November 9 and 10, 1938, gangs of Nazi youth roamed through Jewish neighborhoods breaking windows of Jewish businesses and homes, burning synagogues and looting. • In all, 101 synagogues were destroyed and almost 7,500 Jewish businesses were destroyed. 26,000 Jews were arrested and sent to concentration camps. • Jews were physically attacked and beaten and 91 died in the attack.
  82. 82. Kristallnacht
  83. 83. Kristallnacht
  84. 84. 1938-Cont. • All Jewish children are expelled from public schools in Germany and Austria. • Nazis take control of Jewish-owned businesses.
  85. 85. 1939 • Hitler orders the systematic murder of the mentally and physically disabled in Germany and Austria • Jews are required to wear armbands or yellow stars
  86. 86. 1940 • Nazis begin deporting German Jews to Poland • Jews are forced into ghettos • Nazis begin the first mass murder of Jews in Poland
  87. 87. 1941 • Jews throughout Eastern Europe are forced into ghettos • In two days, German units shoot 33,771 Ukrainian Jews at BabiYar- the largest single massacre of the Holocaust • The death camp at Chelmno in Poland begins murdering Jews
  88. 88. 1942 • Nazi officials announce "Final Solution"- their plan to kill all European Jews • Five death camps begin operation in Poland: Majdanek, Sobibor, Treblinka, Belzec, and Auschwitz- Birkenau • Ghettos of Eastern Europe are being emptied as thousands of Jews are shipped to death camps. • The United States, Great Britian, and the Soviet Union acknowledge that Germans are exterminating the Jews of Europe.
  89. 89. 1943 • Jews in the Warsaw Ghetto resist as the Nazis begin new rounds of deportations. These Jews hold out for nearly a month before the Nazis put down the uprising.
  90. 90. 1944 • Hitler takes over Hungary and begins deporting 12,000 Hungarian Jews each day to Auschwitz where they are murdered
  91. 91. 1945 • Hitler is defeated and World War II ends in Europe. • The Holocaust is over and the death camps are emptied. • Many survivors are placed in displaced persons camps until they find a country willing to accept them.
  92. 92. 1947 • The United Nations establishes a Jewish homeland in British- controlled Palestine, which becomes the State of Israel in 1948.
  93. 93. Auschwitz
  94. 94. Nazi Death Camps
  95. 95. Why did the US and Allies Win WWII?

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