Cyber bullyingchurch
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This is a presentation given to group of parents at a church in Sydney's (Australia) north western suburbs.

This is a presentation given to group of parents at a church in Sydney's (Australia) north western suburbs.
John Clear jclear@aisnsw.edu.au

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  • Straight in, no intro here
  • Intro me Emphasise I am a teacher AND a parent of 4 teenagers. I know how hard this can be So a look today from teacher and parent perspective MORE than just cyber bullying, more than that, cyber awareness including privacy, what we can do as teachers and parents, and some of the unbelievable things that exist in the online world. We’ll look at online communications… which is what millions of children see as THE MAIN THING the internet can do for them (as opposed to us – searching for information and doing reports) Hopefully I won’t scare you… we are constantly bombarded with negative stories about the internet and its dangers. What I want to do today is look at some of the good, the bad and the ugly of the internet, and help you leave with a greater awareness of the issues facing the children in our care and how we can learn to understand the world in which they spend so much time. Forewarned is forearmed
  • Show of hands who identifies with this? I do to a certain extent because there is so much to learn and experience I have 4 teenage chn… Lauren living overseas and her mother wrote on her wall and reprimanded Someone said They live, we visit The Australian Bureau of Statistics identifies the average age of a teacher in an Australian school as 43 Teachers who are older than 45 make up 44% of the teaching population So of course Many teachers today would identify with this statement
  • An interesting way of showing a video isn’t it? Low tech has become attention grabbing. Imagine if you brought a record player in to the classroom!
  • What are the key risks?
  • We need to have an understanding of what the internet is and how it works. It is a global collection of networks, both big and small. These networks connect together in many different ways to form the single entity that we know as the Internet . In fact, the very name comes from this idea of interconnected networks. Our computer or computers are part of the WWW
  • It goes through many ISPs, servers and databases along the way. Many people can see this data.
  • But wait, there’s more
  • Low res images
  • So, look at SN What site comes to mind regarding this?
  • So to facebook, the biggest social networking site
  • Been in the news lately
  • Active = past 30 days 600 million users in July 2010 Founded by 4 students in February 2004 from Harvard dorm room, now has 1,400+ employees April 2009 Facebook reaches over 200 million active users Started out as thefacebook.com so let’s have a look at the wayback machine
  • My space 122 million monthly unique visitors Twitter 80 Bebo 7 Friendster 5
  • How many can you name
  • Parody video shows some of the elements of social networking… status, that is what you are doing right now, pictures, friends, events… Raises an important issue… “used to go to the mall and meet people” “ if the internet crashed”
  • Facebook Privacy Policy –which all Facebook users must agree to in order to use the service –almost 6000 words 170 different privacy variations opt-out”, rather than the previous method of “opt-in”
  • So with loosening of privacy at SN sites, more than ever before, everyone needs to “Think before you post”
  • Teen brains in the process of growing and forming and are prone to risk taking. Current research suggests that males take a little longer to fully realise the consequences of some of their decisions.
  • Why Today’s title? First, get your attention But also, Teens often hide behind a nickname… Spanky does exist!
  • And this is so often what is reported that they are doing in this space!
  • Clearly, spanky 512 doesn’t think before he posts… next slide
  • Look at Tara Look at next slide example
  • This image has been removed… But it can be found elsewhere Palin picture as an example. Save it and upload using tineye Look at thefacebook.com
  • So this becomes increasingly important This is from triple J Hack Half Hour
  • Kids need to learn these lessons now so they don’t fall down later… obviously plenty of adults haven’t learnt the Richard Branson’s Virgin Atlantic had to fire 13 staff in November 2008 after they were caught complaining about passengers – and the airline’s safety procedures – on Facebook. October 2008 Sydney’s Daily Telegraph ran a story about a call centre employee getting sprung skipping work to nurse a hangover when his boss checked out his Facebook profile. Kyle Doyle challenged his employer to prove the sick day was not legitimate, and received in response a screenshot of his status update on Facebook: “Kyle Doyle is not going to work, f**k it I’m still trashed. SICKIE WOO!”
  • Sadly, we can’t always be responsible for what OTHERS upload though…
  • As well as posting really stupid things that cast us in a bad light, Timely to think of how images in the digital and print media can do the opposite… that is, “normal” becomes distorted … hence the Subtitle Dove evolution add Extraordinary what some can do… do a YouTube search for “extreme makeover Photoshop” As evidenced by the video Photoshop Extreme Makeover.wmv
  • Bennett Aaron
  • How hard to get one’s identity back
  • You’d be surprised
  • You’d be surprised
  • OK, so now we know of all these different social networking sites… what if someone made a search engine that took all this freely available data from social networking sites, phone directories, marketing surveys, mailing lists, government census, real estate listings, and business websites. All data is publicly available, so anyone can access them from their respective sources. to collaborate with each other, work together Do John Clear Try one from Tara – friend in the states? Get John Clear’s phone number for next slide
  • So, now we recognise all this, what are some of the key risks? Cyberbullying
  • Maximum penalty 10 yrs imprisonment in NSW No children charged or imprisoned to date
  • Donna Cross Edith Cowan “Same dog, different fleas.” bullying through an internet service such as email, chat room, discussion group, online social networking, instant messaging or web pages. It can also include bullying through mobile phone technologies such as SMS. When researchers talk about children who reported that they were bullied, that means every few weeks or more often, not one off incidents 25% Of children in Australia reported that are bullied every few weeks or more often. Australia has one of the highest reported incidences of bullying in the world Where you in the world can determine the type of cyber bullying you experience. In Germany for instance most cyber bullying occurs in chat rooms. In Australia, social networking sites are becoming the most popular place to cyber bullying – previously it was texting.
  • Differs to normal bullying in that there is no escape from it. If physical bullying occurs at school, at least there can be respite at home or in the holidays. Cyber bullying is available all day every day 24/7 access Broadcast repeatedly – used in years from now. Can be anonymous. 50% reported that they didn’t know for certain who was doing the Cyberbullying. They reported that it was someone who knows them however because the content indicated this. Lots of ways to conceal their identity. Less likely to tell people about it (the challenge is for us to teachers to know what to do when kids do tell) Need to encourage children to know that if they tell then the situation will get better, not worse… currently many chn believe that if they do tell then they will have their internet privileges or phone taken away from them, and this is perceived as worse than being cyberbullied. Kids will often be nastier online than they ever would be face to face. Ramifications for schools… previously, kids would arrive at school in February having had a break over the holidays from their peers… now they can arrive with a fully inflamed bullying situation ready to explode on the first day.
  • On November 4, 2002 the student made a video of himself swinging a golf ball retriever around as a weapon. The video was filmed at his high school studio, and the tape left in a basement. Inadvertently, he taped it over a portion of a basketball game (as seen extremely briefly at the end of the clip). The original owner of the videotape discovered it and immediately shared it with friends. Thinking that it would be a funny prank, one of them encoded it to a WMV file and published it over the Kazaa peer-to-peer file sharing network. Like Napstar or Lime Wire It was also hosted on a personal website.
  • Within two weeks, the file had been downloaded several million times. An adapted version of the video was created, adding Star Wars music , texts, and light saber lights and sounds to his golf ball retriever.
  • Other video parodies followed. Currently There Are more than 150 Clone Videos and parodies have appeared in mainstream media including American Dad, South Park, "Weird Al" Yankovic music video "White & Nerdy", in the Disney movie Sky High and in the video game Tony Hawk's Underground 2 As of November 27, 2006 it was estimated by The Viral Factory that the videos had been viewed over 900 million times, making it the most popular " viral video " on the Internet. [1] Harassment lawsuit and settlement In July 2003, the student's family filed a CA$ 250,000 lawsuit against the families of four of his schoolmates. The lawsuit stated, in part, that he " had to endure, and still endures today, harassment and derision from his high-school mates and the public at large " and " will be under psychiatric care for an indefinite amount of time. " [2] Legal proceedings against one family were quickly dropped. [3] The lawsuit had been scheduled to begin trial on April 10, 2006, [4] but on April 7, the boy and his parents reached an out-of-court settlement with the defendants, being awarded CA$351,000. [3]
  • Now, speaking of Bullying, can you imagine the ramifications of free on-line tools like this?
  • School uniform – unintentionally give away information
  • If 64 % of 15- to 20-year-olds have a social network site such as MySpace or Facebook, perhaps it’s time for teachers to delve into their world
  • What follows is from the research from he Australian covert bullying prevalence study A 2007 – 2008 DEWR National study of 10,000 students, 7500 of whom filled in a complete survey. 106 schools (55 primary and 51 secondary) Allows for the comparison of New South Wales schools against the Australian median http://www.deewr.gov.au/Schooling/NationalSafeSchools /Pages/research.aspx
  • Bullied today. Not the children who were bullied yesterday nor again tomorrow. This is not a small issue. 7 minute moment! This is all forms of bullying, but we know that 80% of all children who are cyber bullied are also face-to-face bullied 80% of all children who are cyber bullying are also face-to-face bullying Cyber bullying has made it easier to bully and easier to continue bullying over time
  • Bullied today. Not the children who were bullied yesterday nor again tomorrow. This is not a small issue. 7 minute moment! This is all forms of bullying, but we know that 80% of all children who are cyber bullied are also face-to-face bullied 80% of all children who are cyber bullying are also face-to-face bullying Cyber bullying has made it easier to bully and easier to continue bullying over time
  • One of the major findings from the Australian covert bullying prevalence study was that overt bullying, that is the bullying you can see, is being handled quite well. Physical bullying is generally declining. But we are seeing an alarming increase in the amount of covert bullying In a survey, teachers were asked which is worse overt or covert bullying ( using different terms and explaining what this means to them) teachers reported that over bullying was much worse than covert bullying – it’s much worse to be physically hurt when you ask children what was worse they say the exact opposite. overwhelmingly they all said covert bullying was worse. They claimed that teachers didn’t take it seriously. Teachers told children to ignore it – the old sticks and stones will break my bones attitude prevailed. Find another group of friends Darling. The danger of this is through their inaction the teacher is acknowledging that it’s okay to behave this way From the survey, half of the kids who reported being bullied said they told someone (friend etc) Of the half who told someone, half of these children said the problem stayed the same or got worse. So there are some pretty vulnerable kids there. We have an obligation as adults to do something when they tell us. So we need to think through carefully what our actions might be when they come to us.
  • Teasing and spreading rumours >> Caution about “harden up” or “sticks and stones” Recent outrage over racist remarks… they were just words but we have legislation in place.
  • Stealing (or more likely getting in first and taking) someone’s online name and using it to write nasty rumors, comment, or spread gossip. Altering someone’s message or doctoring photographs to say something different or poke fun at a person. Secretly recording conversations using a cell phone, then playing the recording back for the person being discussed. Posting damaging information on blogs or web sites. Upskirting and downblousing, toilets especially a problem Creating or taking part in Internet polling. Video is from “Let’s fight it together” from cybersmart.gov.au What examples do you see there?
  • No surprises here at all… we've all heard the cases like the Victorian case Geelong Western Heights College… 4 suicides in recent times, most recently Chanelle Rae, from Geelong's Western Heights College, took her life in July last year in another heartbreaking loss for the 1400-pupil school. The 14-year-old is the fourth current or former student to take their life in the past six months, the Geelong Advertiser reports. Chanelle's mother, Karen, told 3AW radio this morning that her daughter had been bullied online before her death.
  • One of the most important pieces of evidence to come from the covert bullying study are this. Clearly, we have a very troubled group of children, but they don’t always get the help they need because we’re too busy growling at them for being bullies. They often don’t get the counselling… it’s the child themselves who get that, these kids just get detention or suspension, and so the cycle continues.  go back one slide to refer. We know that 80% of chn who face to face bully also cyperbully, then whatever we do to change the perpetrator’s behaviour will have flow on effects to cyberbullying.
  • Terms we should be using to describe cyberbullying – as reported to those who conducted the covert bullying study. Posting has special concern for teachers. In a study by Peter Smith out of the UK, he asked chn what hurt the most. “Anything with pictures/video” http://www.education.com/reference/article/cyberbullying-research/ and look at p3 for reference.
  • Clearly a troubled group of children Research from Donna Cross (Edith Cowan University).
  • And it does take action… we need to take a proactive stance and… Challenge for us is do we focus on the technology or the behaviour? Research from Donna Cross suggests the behaviour. Need to understand the technology, but it’s not going away! It’ll only become more pervasive.
  • Mobilise young people… Bystanders… In the main, kids hate bullying, hate seeing someone denigrated. But less than 10% will do something proactive about it at that time. It’s hard… only high status kids can step up… that’s the power of any bullying, cyber is no different. Unrealistic for us to go out and tell all kids to stand up to the bullies… they won’t. Younger students are more likely to intervene and more successful when they do. Give students strategies to intervene… like send an email later after online chat bullying example. What can I do to help. You can be a bystander without exposing themselves. They can step in and help behind the scenes. Girls are more likely to intervene than boys
  • There’s research to suggest that this is a strategy worth pursuing
  • Needs to be taught. Not osmosis Awareness of stories and consequences – not for them but for their peers Netiquette needs to be taught. We can’t assume that students know how to behave without inadvertently inflaming a situation. Speaking of education, Kate Miller-Heidke 'Caught In The Crowd' Video Competition What’s sad is that the school was in the headlines shortly after this The winning video was announced on 15.04.09… note date to this story?
  • Keep a record (including time and date) - This may help them (or the police) to find out who is sending the messages. Tell someone – Tell them to talk to someone they trust, a parent, friend, school counsellor or teacher. Contact your phone or internet service provider and report what is happening - They can help you block messages or calls from certain senders. If messages are threatening or serious get in touch with the police - Cyberbullying, if it's threatening, is illegal. No one need put up with that! Don't reply to bullying messages - It'll only get worse if you do. By replying the bully gets what he or she wants. Often if students don't reply the bully will leave them alone. (this is NOT saying ignore it and it will go away… because you are going to do all of the above as well. Block the sender if possible. Some programs allow you to do this, or have their messages sent straight to the trash Change your contact details - Get a new user name for the internet, a new e-mail account, a new mobile phone number and only give them out to your closest friends. Keep your username and passwords secret - Keep your personal information private so it doesn't fall into the hands of someone who'll misuse it.
  • Grouping children with problem behaviours Exclusion by pro-social peers Punishment only Diffusion of responsibility – appoint peer mediators to “watch out” for those who are likely to bully. Doesn’t work. Once we make chn (or adults for that matter) the person who is in charge of regulating the environment, others don’t take action. It’s someone else’s job. Adults do this with the police. Bystanders will walk away from a crime if police are present… it’s their job! Peer counselling / mediation Banning technology… how do kids learn to use facebook if they are never allowed to go on it? And they won’t tell you of any problems if this is the punishment. And how many kids at this school have a mobile phone that you don’t know about when they have to hand theirs in at the start of the day? Has prohibition been a successful strategy for any issue in society? Specifically mobile phones… discussion. Show my mobile phone as a modem to access photosynth.net
  • John http://manly-daily.whereilive.com.au/news/story/the-fame-game/ Dr Carr-Gregg recommends parents insist on the following rules to ensure teenage safety on the internet. 1 There has to be a blanket rule that no kid has a computer in the bedroom. Second, there must be an online family contract which I outline in Real Wired Child. Third, make sure you have an adequate filtering system; K9 web protection is free and the best available. Last, parents need to stand up and take responsibility. You’ll cope some flak but that’s what being a parent is all about. Monitoring and supervision is imperative.’’
  • John http://manly-daily.whereilive.com.au/news/story/the-fame-game/ Dr Carr-Gregg recommends parents insist on the following rules to ensure teenage safety on the internet. 1 There has to be a blanket rule that no kid has a computer in the bedroom. Second, there must be an online family contract which I outline in Real Wired Child. Third, make sure you have an adequate filtering system; K9 web protection is free and the best available. Last, parents need to stand up and take responsibility. You’ll cope some flak but that’s what being a parent is all about. Monitoring and supervision is imperative.’’
  • John http://manly-daily.whereilive.com.au/news/story/the-fame-game/ Dr Carr-Gregg recommends parents insist on the following rules to ensure teenage safety on the internet. 1 There has to be a blanket rule that no kid has a computer in the bedroom. Second, there must be an online family contract which I outline in Real Wired Child. Third, make sure you have an adequate filtering system; K9 web protection is free and the best available. Last, parents need to stand up and take responsibility. You’ll cope some flak but that’s what being a parent is all about. Monitoring and supervision is imperative.’’
  • There are many sites where teachers can go to work with their students on Cyber awareness and cyber safety The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) has developed sites that are applicable to students of all ages Many are packaged as games Some like cybersmart detectives are played in real time with children from outside the immediate school environment. Teachers register their teams with ACMA to take part in the activity which is played against teams from various schools linked via a central website on a secure server in the United Kingdom
  • cyberaware.wikispaces.com
  • Intro me Emphasise I am a teacher AND a parent of 4 teenagers. I know how hard this can be So a look today from teacher and parent perspective

Cyber bullyingchurch Presentation Transcript

  • 1.  
  • 2.  
  • 3.
    • You have received Text messages
  • 4.
    • You have sent Text messages
  • 5.
    • Watched YouTube video
  • 6.
    • Your mobile phone has features you don't know how to use
  • 7.
    • Know what twitter is
  • 8.
    • Know what “blogs” are
  • 9.
    • Read some blogs
  • 10.
    • Taken a picture with a phone
  • 11.
    • Have your own Facebook or MySpace or Bebo page
  • 12.
    • Ever used a mobile phone to access the Internet
  • 13.
    • Had a conversation with anyone about how to stay safe online
  • 14.
    • Bought an item on eBay
  • 15.
    • Sold one
  • 16.
    • Participated in an online game at any stage?
  • 17.
    • Authored a YouTube video
  • 18.
    • Use a GPS
  • 19.
    • Use a GPS on your phone
  • 20.
    • Published (at least) one blog or wiki
  • 21.
    • Cleaned up from a virus or spyware attack
  • 22.
    • You know the password for your wireless internet access at home
  • 23.
    • You are the one who will set up the new computer/TV/set top box/home theatre system for your house
  • 24.
    • and for your mother
  • 25.
    • and for those poor few still standing…
  • 26.
    • YOU are the one everyone blames when the technology fails in your house –
    • and maybe at work.
  • 27. John Clear ICT Education Consultant (& Parent)
  • 28. Their Space Young people are spending their time in a space which adults find difficult to supervise or understand Hannah Green and Celia Hannon “ Their Space: Education for a digital generation”
  • 29. Social Networking What is it?
  • 30.  
  • 31. Social Networking What’s the big deal? Why is it important?
  • 32. What is the Web?
  • 33. Where does my internet data go? Me ISP ISP Larger ISP Larger ISP Regional ISP Australian ISP Pacific ISP Pacific ISP Friend
  • 34. So…
    • many people can potentially see all the content anyone puts on the internet
  • 35. Extract Information?
    • Spider Programs can
      • find particular words on web pages
      • find patterns in images
      • find images with lots of skin
      • find images with faces or bodies using face detection algorithms
      • find patterns, skin etc in videos
    Bang Weed
  • 36. Where could it go?
    • Your words and pictures
    • could be used
    • in pornography,
    • with violent imagery,
    • with obscene language,
    • in racist and hate propaganda
    IN A WAY YOU DIDN’T EXPECT Image from: http://blog.celebsnapshot.com/2008/09/03/governor-sarah-palin-clad-in-bikini-with-firearm-in-hand.aspx accessed 26/7/2009
  • 37. Social Networking
  • 38.  
  • 39.  
  • 40.
    • claims…
    • more than 600 million active users
    • 50% of active users log on to Facebook in any given day
    • average user has 130 friends
  • 41. Other Social Networking Sites
  • 42. Other Social Networking Sites
  • 43.  
  • 44.  
  • 45.  
  • 46. Flickr CC licensed image by Ollie Crafoord Flickr CC licensed image by Ken Banks Kiwanja.net Flickr CC licensed image by Robert scoble Flickr CC licensed image by adpowers
  • 47. 512 512
  • 48.
    • Should you friend a student?
    Photos of Spanky512 | Spanky512’s Profile
  • 49.
    • Flickr CC image by bdjsb7 / Justin Moore  
  • 50.
    • Should you friend a student?
    Photos of Spanky512 | Spanky512’s Profile
  • 51. Think before you post
  • 52. What happens if you change your mind about material you have put on the internet?
    • web .archive.org
    • Web site which stores copies of other web sites for archiving
    • so you can look up a web site from 1996!
    • It includes texts , audio , moving images , and software
    • as well as archived web pages .
  • 53.  
  • 54. Reputation Management
  • 55. Facebook and the boss Image by Sharyn Raggett !!!!!
  • 56.  
  • 57. Keeping Up Appearances
    • or… “How come I’m not more beautiful?”
  • 58. Privacy Issues
  • 59. Privacy Issues
    • What to upload to the internet?
  • 60. Privacy Issues
    • What to upload to the internet?
  • 61. Privacy Issues
    • What to upload to the internet?
  • 62. Privacy Issues
    • What to upload to the internet?
  • 63. Privacy Issues
    • What to upload to the internet?
  • 64. Are they really doing that?!
  • 65. Are they really doing that?!
  • 66. Are they really doing that?!
  • 67. Cyber Bullying
  • 68. Cyber bullying is a crime!
    • Section 545AB of the Crimes Act 1900 (amended) (NSW, Australia)
    Flickr licensed image by Morning theft
  • 69. What is Cyberbullying?
    • Cyber bullying is when an individual, or group, use the internet, mobile phones or other technology to intentionally hurt another person or group of people.
    Flickr CC image by * mangu* wanders by mistake…
  • 70. What is Cyberbullying?
    • Cyberbullying is different to normal bullying:
    • no escape – 24/7
    • broadcast repeatedly
    • anonymous.
    • less likely to tell
    • tend be nastier online than they ever would be face to face.
  • 71. Star wars kid
  • 72. Star wars kid
  • 73. Star wars kid
  • 74. Email
  • 75. What can we do as parents? CC Flickr Image by Ingorrr/Ingrid
  • 76. Teach our children good habits
    • Photos, profile pics and Avatars
    • Username Spanky512 or John Clear or metaljar?
    • Your personal details
    • Personal details of others
    • What to do if someone sends you an offensive or inappropriate message
  • 77. Take a walk in their shoes, be equipped! CC Flickr Image by Klearchos Kapoutsis
  • 78. Dipping your toe in the ‘online waters’
    • Blog
    • Wiki
    • Flickr photo account
    • Facebook
    • Twitter
    • Skype
    Web 2.0
  • 79.  
  • 80. Current data
    • The Australian covert bullying prevalence study
    Flickr licensed image by grahford
  • 81. Extent of bullying
    • At school today , 100000 children will be bullied by the end of lunchtime in Australian schools
  • 82. Flickr Creative Commons image by Foraggio Fotographic
  • 83. Prevalence
    • In a class of 30 students in Australia today:
    • 3 are bullied “most days”
    • 5 are bullied once a week
    • 8 are bullied at least once a term
    • 1-2 bully others “most days”
  • 84. Overt and Covert bullying Flickr image by beboehmer Licensed image from Let’s Fight It Together – childnet international
  • 85. Covert bullying cycle of inaction Normative culture of acceptance of (covert) bullying Poor teacher response due to inability or inexperience to recognise it, and/or belief covert bullying is less harmful or not a form of bullying. Student bullied feels less empowered due to teacher inaction. Student involved believe covert bullying is tolerated or condoned Students who are bullied are less likely to seek help or tell Cross et al 2008
  • 86. Examples of Cyberbullying
    • Teasing
    • Spreading rumours
    • Sending unwanted messages
    • Defamation
    • Masquerading as another person
    • Threatening violence via digital means
  • 87.
    • Stealing someone’s online name
    • Altering messages
    • Doctoring photographs
    • Secretly recording conversations
    • Posting damaging information
    • Internet polling
    Examples of Cyberbullying
  • 88. The effects of being bullied
    • impaired social and emotional adjustment (Nansel et al., 2001)
    • poor academic achievement (Beran & Lupart, 2009; Nansel et al., 2001)
    • anxiety, depression and suicidality (Kaltiala-Heino, Rimpela, Marttunen, Rimpela, & Rantanen, 1999)
    • poorer physical health (Wolke, Woods, Bloomfield, & Karstadt, 2001)
    • higher absenteeism (Strabstein & Piazza, 2008)
    • increased loneliness and low self esteem (Jankauskiene, Kardelis, Sukys, & Kardeliene, 2008)
  • 89. Who bullies?
    • Boys and Girls
      • Cruel teasing and name calling most common
    • Boys
      • More overt/physical
    • Girls
      • More covert – threats, exclusion, rumours, using technology
    (Jankauskiene, Kardelis, Sukys, & Kardeliene, 2008)
  • 90. Why bully others?
    • Boys
      • Dominance
      • Power
    • Girls
      • Social confidence
      • Maintain exclusive group of friends
    (Jankauskiene, Kardelis, Sukys, & Kardeliene, 2008)
  • 91. But!
    • while children who are being bullied and the bullies themselves have higher levels of depression than other children…
      • … the bullies themselves have the highest levels of depression (Kaltiala-Heino et al., 2000; Kaltiala-Heino, Rimpela, Marttunen, Rimpela, & Rantanen, 1999)
  • 92. Cyberbullying Terms
    • Flaming – heated exchange
    • Harassing and threatening messages eg: “text wars”, “griefers”
    • Denigration - sending nasty SMS, pictures or prank phone calls “Slam books” (websites or negative lists)
    • Impersonation - Using person’s screen name or password eg: message to hate group w/ personal details
    • Outing or trickery - sharing private personal information, messages, pictures with others
    • Posting “set up” images/video e.g. “happy slapping”
    • Ostracism - Intentionally excluding others from an online group eg: knocked off buddy lists
    • Sexting sharing explicit material by mobile phone
  • 93. What we know…
    • Students who cyberbully others
    • access to mobile phone
    • no internet use rules at home
    • wireless internet access at home
    • bully others face to face
    • cyber and face to face bullied
  • 94.
    • Students who cyberbully others
    • male, secondary student
    • favourable attitudes to cyber bullying
    • below average academic achievement
    • more lonely and less connected to school
    • more likely to engage in unsafe sex, graffiti, use drugs more often, steal, truant
    (Cross et al, 2008) What we know…
  • 95. Do we focus on the technology or the behaviour to manage cyber bullying? Flickr cc image by looking4poetry
  • 96. What actions can be taken to tackle cyber bullying?
    • Mobilise bystanders
    Flickr cc image by eightfivezero
  • 97. What actions can schools take to prevent and manage cyber bullying?
    • The majority of peer interventions are effective, with the bullying stopping within 10 seconds of peer intervention (Hawkins et al., 2001)
    • Reconciliation occurred when bystanders intervened and less when teacher intervened. (Fujisawa et al, 2005)
    • Students who are ‘defended’ are better adjusted, and report less peer-reported victimisation one year later (Sainio, Veenstra, Huitsing, & Salmivalli, 2009)
  • 98. What actions can we take to prevent and manage cyber bullying?
      • education
      • awareness
      • netiquette
  • 99. Advice for students who report being cyberbullied
    • Keep a record
    • Tell someone
    • Contact your phone or internet service provider and report what is happening
    • If messages are threatening or serious, contact the police
    • Don't reply, block the sender
    • Change your contact details
    • Keep your username and passwords secret
  • 100. What doesn’t seem to work?
      • Grouping children with problem behaviours
      • Exclusion by pro-social peers
      • Punishment only
      • Diffusion of responsibility
      • Peer counselling / mediation
      • Banning technology…
        • What about mobile phones?
  • 101. at home… Recommendations: Dr Michael Carr-Gregg
    • Parents must insist on the following rules to ensure teenage safety on the internet…
    • No computers in the bedroom
    Real Wired Child by Dr Michael Carr-Gregg
  • 102. at home… Recommendations: Dr Michael Carr-Gregg
    • Parents must insist on the following rules to ensure teenage safety on the internet…
    • No computers in the bedroom
    • An online family contract
    Real Wired Child by Dr Michael Carr-Gregg
  • 103.
    • All computer use may be monitored
    • Limit screen time (quantity and time-of-day)
      • For ALL types of screens – TV, computer, IM, cell phone, games, iPod
      • Have rules for what must be completed before screen time
    • Devices downstairs at bedtime – nothing in their room
    • Allow Internet access only when parents are home
    • Only communicate (e-mail, IM, TXT) with people you already know (in real life)
    • Parents have a list of all accounts you use and all passwords
    • Discuss list of sites they are allowed to visit
  • 104.
    • What to do when…
    • Somebody stumbles on inappropriate material
    • You feel uncomfortable
    • You get a virus / spyware
  • 105.
    • Before Screen Time…
      • Today’s homework is finished
      • Your homework is in your bag
      • Your space is cleaned up
      • You have completed today’s household chores
      • You are on schedule with any project you have
      • Instrument practice is complete
      • It is BEFORE xxx on school nights (xxx on non-school nights)
  • 106. at home… Recommendations: Dr Michael Carr-Gregg
    • Parents must insist on the following rules to ensure teenage safety on the internet…
    • No computers in the bedroom
    • An online family contract
    • Adequate filtering
      • K9 web protection is free
    • Parents need to stand up and take responsibility.
    Real Wired Child by Dr Michael Carr-Gregg
  • 107.  
  • 108. Take A Walk Through Cyberspace – With Your Child
    • Pull up a chair next to your child at the computer and ask them to…
      • Share with me all the programs and sites you use for gaming, IM and social networking sites
      • Share with me all the screen names and email accounts you use and passwords
      • Show me your personal website, and any profiles you have on social networking sites, as well as your “away” message
      • Share with me your buddy list – ensure you know IRL
  • 109. Take A Walk Through Cyberspace – With Your Child
    • Pull up a chair next to your child at the computer and ask them to…
      • Ask if they’ve shared their password with a friend
      • Define cyber-bullying and discuss
      • Check for naivety and “netiquette”
      • Create a safe, respectable online personality
    • Establish trust - but-verify policy
    • Consider appropriate technology for their age
  • 110. Where to go
  • 111.  
  • 112. Resources
    • aisnswict.wikispaces.com
  • 113. Final Questions?
  • 114. John Clear [email_address] No matter how old you are, when you go out into the world, hold hands and stick together
  • 115. Use alternatives to Google
    • For the youngest students