Bake UX into your Startup (March 2009)
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Bake UX into your Startup (March 2009)

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  • 1. eBIG Presentation : Bake User Experience Strategy Into Your Startup March 2009 Meadow Consulting  Meghan Ede
  • 2. Agenda
    • Speaker
    • What is User Experience?
    • How to “Bake it in”?
    • UX Professionals
    • Meadow Consulting Services
    • Contact Information
  • 3. Meghan Ede
    • Nearly 20 years hands-on experience:
      • User Experience Strategy & Research
      • Enterprise, IT, finance, productivity, consumer
      • Products, websites, web applications, documentation, education programs
    • Before Consulting, Meghan was:
      • Staff, Manager, Director, VP in UCD at…
      • PayPal/eBay, Charles Schwab, Wells Fargo, Intuit, Sun Microsystems, Symantec/Norton…
      • Master’s in Psychology (Human Factors)
      • Skated to University
  • 4. User Interface (UI)
    • If your product has…
    • A user accessible portion, then it has a UI
    • “ Look and Feel”
    UI User Interface Feature Set What you see in product Web Page Task Flow Controls
  • 5. User Experience…
    • Every contact your customer makes with your product or service or staff….
      • Is part of their experience !
    • Affects their…
      • Perception of your product
      • Understanding of what your product does
      • Satisfaction with your product
      • Likelihood to buy or buy again
  • 6. User Experience is more than UI User Experience UI User Interface Feature Set What you see in product Web Page Task Flow Controls
    • Marketing
    • Newsletters
    • Box design
    • Ads
    • Installer
    • Wizard
    • Command Line
    • Download
    • Training
    • Webinars
    • Manuals
    • Classes
    • Tutorials
    • Documents
    • User Guide
    • Quick Start
    • Online help
    • Updates
    • Recalls
    • Patches (CDs)
    • Auto-updater
    • Email notices
    • Sales
    • Demo
    • Trade Show
    • Contracts
    • Invoices
    • Partners
    • Resellers
    • 3 rd party apps
    • OEM
    • Forums
    • Blogs
    • Facebook
    • Reviews
  • 7. User Experience also…
    • Happens over time…
    Possible Customer Interactions with a Product over Time Update Upgrade Trouble- shoot Use Download / Install Purchase / Obtain Decide Inform
  • 8. Control
    • May include things you don’t control
    Possible Customer Interactions with a Product over Time Ads Reviews Facebook Inform Update Upgrade Trouble- shoot Use Download / Install Purchase / Obtain Decide
  • 9. Departments
    • May include things you control… in different depts.
    Marketing Sales Engineering Documentation Possible Customer Interactions with a Product over Time CD Mail Website Product Key Internet speed Network Help Info Instructions Contracts Salesperson Website Product Key Email Instructions CD Cover Box Pull-out Website info Cost Feature List Download / Install Purchase / Obtain Decide Update Upgrade Trouble- shoot Use Inform
  • 10. Main Product
    • Definitely includes the UI - “face” of your product
    Possible Customer Interactions with a Product over Time Use UI Features Look “ Feel” Easy / Hard Learning Curve Task Flow Screens Stability Performance Inform Download / Install Purchase / Obtain Decide Update Upgrade Trouble- shoot
  • 11. After Purchase
    • And frequently includes a long relationship “after purchase”
    Possible Customer Interactions with a Product over Time Email Notifications Friend Bill / Invoice Chat Mail Phone Quality Service Contract Box Info FAQ Reviews Online Help Update Upgrade Trouble-shoot Download / Install Inform Use Purchase / Obtain Decide
  • 12. How to “Bake In” UX Strategy
  • 13. What are the Ingredients?
    • Understand your USERS
    • Set pragmatic UX goals
    • Create a “user-centered” culture
    • Note : A good UI or UX cannot be grafted on “after”, it needs to be “baked in” from the start
  • 14. 1. Understand your USERS
    • Who?  User Profiles / Personas
    • Doing What?  User Tasks
    • Why?  User Goals
    • Where?  Environment
    • When?  End-to-end experience
  • 15. Case Study: Home Computer Product
    • WHO - Customer ≠ User
    • 1 . Household Manager:
      • Purchase Decision
    • 2. Informal Techie:
      • Installation
      • On-call trouble-shooting
      • Often lives outside home
    • 3. Child (4-17 yrs)
      • Responds to messages
      • May be guest in home
    • 4. Parent / Guardian
      • Sets usage rules
    • 25-50 year old
    • Men
    • Technically savvy
    • Own 3+ computers
    • > $60K annual
    User Profiles Market Segment
  • 16. Case Study: Home Computer Product
    • User TASKS
    • Home Manager:
      • Features, value, payment method
      • Reads advertising, purchase steps, box, product returns
    • Informal Techie:
      • Purchase advice, explain features, maintain product
      • Installation steps, product code, passwords, tools, instructions, on-call
    • Child:
      • Uses product, sees most messages (often ignores), may use the product in ways parent/guardian…
    • Parent/Guardian:
      • Controls settings/access (with help from techie)
  • 17. Case Study: Home Computer Product
    • User GOALS:
    • Communicate with my friends
    • Track my home finances
    • Play games
    • Quickly and without FEAR or CONFUSION
    • NOT
      • Learn how to work yet another product
  • 18. Case Study: Home Computer Product
    • Environment
    • Before research:
      • 1:1 relationship - person:computer
  • 19. Case Study: Home Computer Product
    • Environment
    • After research:
    “ Home” Dad’s house Mom’s Boyfriend Dad’s Office Mom’s Office School Relative’s Home Many to many
  • 20. More Ways to Learn about Users
    • User Insights / Research
      • Home / site visits, “follow me home”
      • Card sorting
      • Usability studies, prototype studies
      • Focus groups, Surveys
      • Listen & Observe (use customer feedback)
    • Use the product, realistically
      • Out of box studies, cognitive walkthroughs
      • Use the product, daily and end-to-end
      • Realistic tasks
    • Hire a UX professional to learn more!
  • 21. 2. Set pragmatic UX goals
    • This part is difficult
    • Goals should be:
      • Easy to understand
      • Easy to measure
      • Clearly related to usage
      • Best if they combine biz and UX needs
      • Company-wide, at least some of them
      • Modified and improved over time
  • 22. Example GOALS – out of box
    • Case Study: Computer company
      • Reduce the “out of box” experience from 5 hours to 30 minutes
    • Departments affected:
      • Documentation
      • Box design, packaging, delivery (manufacturing)
      • Customer support
      • Product industrial design
      • CD jewel cases
      • Cross-department knowledge-sharing and cooperation
    • Business impact:
      • Improved brand response
      • Reduce support calls/cost
      • Expand market (to include less technical)
  • 23. Example GOALS - Learning
    • Case Study: Enterprise Network Product
    • 5-day training, 1-2 month installation/configuration, up to 2 years learning and mastery
    • Goal: reduce this customer learning time
    • Departments affected:
      • UI
      • Marketing
      • Sales
      • Training
      • Customer Support / Call Center
      • Customer Forums
      • Etc.
    • Business Impact:
      • Reduced costs: support, training, documentation
      • Increased sales (upgrades, components)
      • Expand market (less technical companies)
  • 24. 3. User-Centered Company
    • Make User Experience
      • A company-wide focus; all depts.
      • A company touch-point
    • Encourage and empower staff to:
      • Make positive user-centered changes
      • Share with each other about users and UX
      • Meet and learn from users regularly
    • Practice:
      • Iterative Design
      • With regular user input
  • 25. Companies are organized to…
    • Efficiently complete DIFFERENT tasks
    • Work is organized by FUNCTION
    • User experience is FRAGMENTED
    Engineering Design Marketing Sales Customer Support Accounts Finance Quality Assurance
  • 26. Company-wide Focus
    • Each department, group gathers important user information:
      • … which is often not shared
    • Information sharing examples…
      • Customer support meets regularly with technical writers – to improve support feedback and prioritize help topics
      • IT department meets with UI design to discuss problems with the Enterprise product used in-house
      • Sales support provides feedback to manufacturing about…
  • 27. Case Study: Intuit
    • “Follow me home”
    • User input championed by CEO
    • All staff encouraged to observe users
      • Usability Studies – open to all
      • Home visits – part of annual goals
      • Personas – posted & discussed regularly
      • Iterative Design with UX goals - standard
  • 28. Standard Development Process Requirements PRD Development QA Design Early Launch (Alpha, Beta, FCS, GA) Full Launch Urgent Fixes “dot” release Focus Groups with customers Surveys Support Calls Meet important customers
    • Emphasis on CUSTOMERS
    • Seek FEATURE information
    • Controlled and limited interactions with staff
  • 29. User-Centered Development Process Requirements PRD Development QA Design Early Launch (Alpha, Beta, FCS, GA) Full Launch Urgent Fixes “dot” release
    • Understand User Needs :
    • Site visits
    • Card-sorting
    • Interviews
    • Task Flow
    Support Calls Meet important customers
    • Understand User Tasks :
    • Prototype/ Wireframe
    • Cognitive Walkthrough
    • Usability Studies
    • Evaluate :
    • Active proto.
    • Usability Studies
    • Terminology
    • International
    • Refine :
    • Screen text, help
    • Beta Feedback
    • Remote studies
    • Site visit
    • Fix & Prepare:
    • Remote studies
    • Cognitive Walkthrough
    • Usability Studies
    • User Panels
    • Shadow Support
    Focus Groups with customers Surveys
    • Customers and USERS
    • Five W’s (what, how, why, when, where)
    • Iterative feedback cycles, company-wide sharing
  • 30. I’m a small company
    • In-house
      • Classes, training, seminars
      • Clear company-wide user experience goals
      • Appoint someone to be user advocate
    • Out-source
      • Hire the skills on contract, part-time, full-time
      • Mix of in-house and on-contract skills
  • 31. User Experience Advocate
    • Appoint someone or a group
    • Looking at the FULL user experience
    • Seeing products/services:
      • The WAY your customer does
    • Who helps the WHOLE company:
      • Have this perspective
    • Consider locating this role at the executive level
    • Consider hiring: UX background / training
  • 32. UX Professions
    • Functional UX Areas
    • A UX professional typically is master of ONE of these functional areas (though their title may be different). Some have skills in multiple areas, but tend to focus more in one than others.
      • User Research, Usability
        • gathering and interpreting info about the 5 Ws for users
      • Interaction Design
        • the “feel” and structure, task flow, wireframes, storyboards
      • Information Architecture
        • organizing large info sets, such as websites, menu structures, content
      • Technical Writing
        • tips, help, on-screen text, labels, manuals, documentation
      • Visual Design
        • the “look”, layout, font, color scheme, icons, graphics, sometimes brand
      • Accessibility
        • making the product accessible to variety of abilities (different levels of sight, hearing, mobility, language understanding, etc.)
      • More…
  • 33. Meadow Consulting
    • Workshops (typically one day):
      • ‘ Quick and dirty’ user profiles
      • Creating great user tasks and task flows
      • Creating good UX goals
      • How to do Paper prototyping
      • How to do Usability Testing (and recruiting)
      • How to do Site/Home visits
      • More…
    • Customized User Research (typically 2-6 weeks):
      • Home / Site visits
      • Remote studies (observe via WebEx)
      • Usability studies
      • Focus groups, Interviews
      • Cognitive Walkthrough
      • Card Sorting
      • More…
    • Strategy Consulting (typically hourly)
      • Provide advice, feedback or instruction on …
      • how to improve your products / services
      • how to create a UX culture (including who to hire)
  • 34. Contact Information For questions or additional information, please contact: Meghan Ede Meadow Consulting 415-706-3989 – cell 408-786-5314 - office [email_address] http://meadow.consulting.googlepages.com/home Build features customers will actually use; fix only what is truly broken ~ Customer information and insights to help you get there ~