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Presentation about how design is becoming the catalyst for all aspects of the planning we are doing for our future library.

Presentation about how design is becoming the catalyst for all aspects of the planning we are doing for our future library.

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Design Catalyst CI Lab Notes Design Catalyst CI Lab Notes Document Transcript

  • Design asCatalyst at UTSLibraryFOR UTS:CI LABS UTS:@malbooth July, 2012 LIBRARY
  • Design as CatalystLibrary Challenges1. Rapidly changing information environment2. Becoming more proactive (we are too passive)3. Staying relevant & engaging withcontemporary culture4. Educating & preparing new librarians
  • Design as CatalystUTS Library Challenges1. Implement & exploit ASRS & RFID technology2. Consolidate two campus libraries in the city3. Plan a future library with relevant services
  • IMAGE: UTS Campus Master Plan LEARNING COMMONS LIBRARY RETRIEVAL SYSTEM Relocated & upgraded UTS Library Underground
  • Design as CatalystThe Library Retrieval System hole being dug (right now - July 2012).
  • Design as Catalyst A big idea (inspiration)We face many changes and challenges as we approach a big new future library space and new technologies overthe next five years. So, we’ve mapped out our approach to all of this in advance.
  • Design as CatalystUTS:Library VisionConnecting people,knowledge & cultureat the heart of thecampus
  • Design as CatalystUTS Library:Towards 2017 & Beyond Culture Knowledge Collaboration
  • Design as Catalyst UTS Library:Towards 2017 & Beyond UTS : Library 2017+ Providing Inspiration Culture Adding Context Recognising UTS to the Knowledge AchievementsCulture is both critical and pivotal to our future. It helps to distinguish us from online services and from a world inwhich libraries have become buildings for books.As well as proving inspiration, meaning and context for knowledge, it helps us connect people to knowledge andto connect people within our community.
  • Design as Catalyst UTS Library:Towards 2017 & Beyond UTS : Library 2017+ Exciting Curiosity Discovery Knowledge New Service New Technology ModelOur efforts with discovery must drive curiosity about our collections and our services. The new technologies weare employing like RFID and ASRS will lead to the design and development of a new service model for our library.That is already starting with research in 2012 into how our users behave and what they need from us.
  • Design as Catalyst UTS Library:Towards 2017 & Beyond UTS : Library 2017+ Knowledge http://youtu.be/dhYIOE7gERAPlease watch the video. It only lasts just over a minute.
  • Design as Catalyst UTS Library:Towards 2017 & Beyond UTS : Library 2017+ Spaces for Interaction Connections Collaboration Inter-disciplinarity Neutral SpaceCollaboration can be enhanced by spatial and furniture design, but we must also be more active in connecting ourusers to encourage collaboration and in going beyond just providing access to a neutral space that isn’t owned bya particular faculty or school within the University. Interactivity between faculties must be encouraged by theprovision of spaces and services in the Library that facilitate those connections.
  • UTS Library 2017 + HOW Ethos Methods Tools Sustainable (Co) Design People Socially responsible Engagement Collections & Innovative Technology New Building(s)This is our how slide. We are only starting this journey, so it is early days yet and we expect some things tochange and evolve as we progress.
  • Design as Catalyst UTS Library:Towards 2017 & Beyond Collaboration Right Now 2012 Envisioned Library Knowledge 2017 Culture 2012 2017What we hope for by 2017 is the development of a broader impact across the collaboration-knowledge-culturespectrum than we have right now in 2012.
  • Design as CatalystThree Design Challenges1. Designing the New Library Spaces2. Designing a New Service Model3. Designing a New Organisation to Move intothe New Space & Deliver the New ServiceModel.
  • Design as CatalystSection 01UTS Library 2017 >Timeline 2012 2013 2014 2015 PRESENT
  • Design as Catalyst MERGE BLAKE & KG LIBRARY REDEVELOP DISCOVERY SERVICES RFID PHASE 2 2012 2013 2014 2015 PRESENT
  • Design as Catalyst MERGE BLAKE & KG LIBRARY REDEVELOP DISCOVERY SERVICES RFID PHASE 2 LRS EXCAVATION LRS BUILD LRS INSTALLATION & LOAD 2012 2013 2014 2015 PRESENT
  • Design as Catalyst MERGE BLAKE & KG LIBRARY REDEVELOP DISCOVERY SERVICES RFID PHASE 2 LRS EXCAVATION LRS BUILD LRS INSTALLATION & LOADSPECIAL COLLECTION DEVELOPMENTARTIST–IN–RESIDENCE PROGRAM 2012 2013 2014 2015 PRESENT
  • Design as Catalyst REDEVELOP DISCOVERY SERVICES MERGE BLAKE & KG LIBRARY RFID PHASE 2 LRS EXCAVATION LRS BUILD LRS INSTALLATION & LOAD DEVELOP NEW SERVICE CO-DESIGN SPATIAL BRIEF FOR REDEVELOPMENT OF BLAKE MODEL NEW LIBRARY LIBRARY SPACESSPECIAL COLLECTION DEVELOPMENTARTIST–IN–RESIDENCE PROGRAM 2012 2013 2014 2015 PRESENT
  • Design as Catalyst Collaborative Creativity (1)First, some history dating back well before we started talking about considered design or design thinking. Beforewe even knew what our challenges would pan out to be ...We started involving staff in our planning some years ago. To liven it up and to encourage broader and moremeaningful engagement by all staff who could attend (it was never compulsory), we made the sessions moreplayful as workshops facilitated by junior professional staff over two half days. People were encouraged to buildprototypes of their ideas and asked to explain them to all. We Tweeted the sessions for all to see live on Twitter.(You can see a live tweet-stream in the image on the right from early 2010. That was way before #QANDA did it.)A collaboratively creative environment had been created through play and all levels of staff participated in thesmall teams together.This was later written up in a scholarly journal artical by Dr Suzanna Sukovic with David Litting and AshleyEngland.We were practicing some of the methods of co-design and participatory design in a process that was very similarto a design thinking workshop without even knowing what those things were.
  • Design as Catalyst Collaborative Creativity (2)We had a strong record of working with current and future stakeholders to try and gain a sense of what theywanted or imagined for our future and their future library. Here is pictured a workshop of junior high schoolstudents who will become our future undergrads. They gave very insightful descriptions of what they thought wasimportant for our future library.
  • Design as Catalyst Atriums & Curves Greenery & Water Media Spaces Obvious Sustainability Art & Randomness Intuitive Tech Meaningful signage Thematic IdentityThese points are what the year 7 & 9 students told us they wanted in a university library of the future after a halfday informal workshop in our current library in September of 2010.Some of the things they told us:Extended learning - the opportunity to learn beyond the set curriculum (i.e. art & culture should be prominent in alibrary).What can we do to provide randomness in our libraries? Everything we do is about (mostly outdated ontologiesand structures!).Gaming & media spaces are probably essential now. A library without them in the future will be irrelevant.Orientation spaces have a significant effect, more significant than any signage, on the behaviour of those entering.It is expected by our clients.Water features, greenery and natural light are probably things we would wish to see ourselves.Future students will expect all technology that we provide to be intuitive. If it isn’t it won’t be used.Signage can be over-done, and to be effective it must be meaningful.Our future students expect like-books to have some kind of thematic identity that gives users/readers a clueabout their content.I didn’t really understand why students said they liked the curved spaces in the UTS Library until I saw those of thePhilological Library in Berlin’s Free University.Library spaces and services must learn to be customisable and personalised. Maybe we are too precious aboutthose spaces and don’t understand their true potential.We want our future library to be a social hub, but it also must provide exposure to culture, so the use of art withinthe library will be critical.Our sustainability initiatives must be visible and demonstrate our progress (or not) in all dimensions/facets.Comfy chairs are essential because patrons simply will not spend every hour in a library awake.“Lack of rules” perhaps indicates that we still have too many rules, or too many signs indicating the rules. Perhapsthere are other ways to influence and encourage behaviour besides rules?
  • Design as Catalyst Design Catalyst #1 Dr Penny Hagen PDC 2010 #GlebeCM @pennyhagenSo, at some stage in 2010, I ran into Penny Hagen who was then completing her PhD at UTS. She skilfullyexplained that what we were trying to do actually had a name as a design discipline or practice - codesign orparticipatory design or user-centred design.Penny connected me to the design community of Sydney via weekly morning coffee meet-ups in Glebe -#GlebeCM. It seems that Penny knew people engaged in design thinking and UX and UI design from all overSydney. A met a dynamic, open, friendly and intelligent network of people from several design firms (DigitalEskimo, Meld, Zumio, Neotony, etc.), independent designers, UI/UX people (from the ABC and Atlassian) and manyothers and got to know them all pretty well over more than a year. I met even more people via#DesignThinkingDrinks.Penny also encouraged me to attend PDC 2010 at UTS: the first ever Participatory Design Conference held in theSouthern Hemisphere, which she helped organise. See the blog post http://www.frommelbin.blogspot.com.au/2010/12/participatory-service-design.html and several subsequent posts from PDC that month.Penny is a very skilled and energetic connector, facilitator, thinker, teacher and organiser. Unfortunately, she wenthome to NZ after completing her PhD. I am ever grateful to her for introducing me to so many people who havebecome friends, colleagues and design mentors for us at work. Her energy, enthusiasm, ideas and her network areall missed in Sydney, but we stay in touch via Twitter and email. And now she is assisting a colleague and friend atthe Auckland University of Technology Library.I cannot over-estimate the pivotal importance of meeting Penny as a critical point on our design journey.
  • Design as Catalyst Design Catalyst #2 DAB Visual Comms Designing Out Crime DAB LAB Maps of Sydney by Dr Kate SweetappleAround the same time opportunities presented themselves for several of us engaged with planning our futurelibrary to work with academic staff and students who were doing some really cool projects on augmented reality,designing out crime, incidental data, etc. We’d already begun a strong relationship via the curator of our DAB LABResearch Gallery to identify and borrow student design work for display in our library.This led to informal meetings with several key Visual Communications academic staff and researchers and thewacquisition of several of their creative works, like the playful data maps of Sydney shown above that map peoplewith avian, constellation and fish surnames against their addresses pulled from the Sydney White Pages database.This new development of special collections was and is a key plank in the development of our future library.The relationship also led to cooperation with those academics and also staff from Industrial Design to identify andselect key work from their graduate student exhibitions for acquisition by the library for its special collection.Finally, this relationship, encouraged by informal meetings in cafes and with advice from curators of significantprivate art collections, led to the 2012 Artist-in-Residence program and the hiring of a 2011 UTS VisualCommunications graduate as our resident designer. More from them later ...
  • Design as Catalyst Design Catalyst #3 U.lab BikeTank 2011In 2011 U.Lab was begun as a joint venture by UTS academics from the faculties of: Business; Design, Architectureand the Built Environment; and Engineering & IT. One of their first programs was BikeTank and several library staffparticipated enthusiastically over the 10 week program. I think this ongoing and strong commitment clearlysignalled our intent to learn more about the design thinking process and collaborative design by a diversecommunity of people.We formed a strong relationship with the u.labbers and they were engaged to facilitate our 2012 library planningdays as full design thinking labs.
  • Design as Catalyst UTS:Library Some Design Initiatives 2010+So, learning from some of the catalysts above gave us ideas and creative ethusiasm to try some new things overthe last few years ...
  • Design as Catalyst LRS Design Team HASSELL StudioThis image shows most of the design team for our underground Library Retrieval System (to use ASRS technologyfrom the US) at a weekly meeting held in Hassell Studio (the architects). I attended all of those meetings as theclient and also as the resident “expert” on ASRS in libraries. Initially I think some found it odd that the clientwanted to be so involved, but I felt we needed to understand all we could about this design project and also thatwe should contribute to it. It was, I think, a mutually beneficial initiative.
  • Design as Catalyst Design Mentors Sustainability Discovery (UX) Planning Service DesignSince then, we have tried several different design mentorships (for want of a better expression):1. To understand both design thinking and being more sustainable at work, we asked Grant Young from Zumioto lead a team of our supervisors and team leaders (the level beneath our layer of department managers) in aproject to get all staff involved in some meaningful sustainability initiatives. This project went in a very differentdirection to what I had in mind, but the initiatives they came up with were successful, my ideas proved to be notbe required and most participants learnt much from the process itself.2. We began a serious two-phased approach towards improving our collection discovery services and onlineinterfaces in 2011. As a first element of this we embarked on some ethnographic research to better understandour clients and that was led by Digital Eskimo professionals. This was our first real attempt at professional UXresearch on a significant scale and it also proved to be a valuable first step for this project.3. As I mentioned before, this year (2012) we used u.lab to facilitate our two half-day planning sessions. Theyhelped us plan out the activities and goals for each day and encouraged us to invite some external guest speakersto inspire us for each day. Both were brilliant: Steve Baty from Meld on Day #1; and Alison Heller from UrbanAffect on Day #2.4. As you will recall from earlier slides, we have three design challenges: spatial, service and organisationaldesign. This year we wanted to make inroads with service design and for that we engaged the assistance of MeldStudios as our latest design mentor. It is just kicking off but already we’ve planned our approach together andseveral staff have attended a half day workshop at Meld to understand the research and data collection process. Ihope that Meld will also be able to deliver an introductory workshop for all of our managers on service designsoon.
  • Design as Catalyst Special CollectionsDeveloping a proper special collection for UTS Library had several objectives:. reintroducing staff to the full curatorial process;. developing a range of design-themed special collections that inspire our clients and provide more context fortheir knowledge;. developing a better understanding of the creative process involved in the production of such works;. providing a new service that helps us to connect and engage with our community (because it largely comes fromthem); and. learning more about design ourselves at a time when our challenges all lie in that area.
  • Design as Catalyst A New Visual Identity ? A COLLABORATION WITH CHRIS GAUL & TOM FETHERSThis is an animated presentation that is best seen in presentation mode.Chris is our first Artist in Residence & Tom is our in-house designer.Together they facilitated a process to deliver a much-needed new visual identity for the library that assists uspresent an engaging call for collaboration in the design of the future library as a cohesive set of visuallystimulating images.After that there is an example of Chris’ work from his residency - some playful experimentation with Discoveryfrom a non-librarian’s perspective.
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  • Design as Catalyst UTS: LIBRARY
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  • Design as Catalyst LEVEL 200s PSYCHOLOGY & PHILOSOPHY 300s SOCIAL SCIENCES LEARNING COMMONS SPECIAL NEEDS ROOM
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  • Design as Catalyst AXIS UTS: LIBRARY ISSUE 05 / 2012 > Open Reserve Upgrade > Insiders Guide To Getting Published > Pat Corrigan Bookplate Collection
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  • Design as Catalyst UTS: 2013 LIBRARY – LIBRARY HANDBOOK NE W OLD T YPOGRAPHY GEOGRAPHY MAKE TAKE HAMLE T BRITNE Y SEMESTER E X AM
  • As our first Artist in Residence, Chris has helped us to understand beyond what we know, he has given us freshnew perspectives on our challenges and presented us with stimulating original ideas.As we prepare to store almost 80% of our physical collection in an underground automated retrieval system, thenature of online interfaces for exploring the collection and browsing books becomes even more relevant.Rather than being sterile and uninspiring, these interfaces can be creative, unexpected tools that encourage playfulexploration and serendipitous discovery.What follows is one of Chris’ concepts that challenge our current understanding of the ways we search for and finditems in vast library collections. He has other concepts that ask if we could allow users to wander the shelveswearing headphones and listening to the babble of books reading themselves aloud. What if our users could tuneinto different frequencies of the books, or use their Dewey call numbers to call them on phones?You can see more of Shelf Life here (with links for further reading) http://www.flickr.com/photos/malbooth/sets/72157631383600686/
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  • Design as CatalystArtist-in-ResidenceCHRIS GAULLibrary Collection 924,903 Items000 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900
  • Design as CatalystArtist-in-ResidenceCHRIS GAULLibrary Collection 924,903 Items000 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900
  • Design as CatalystArtist-in-ResidenceCHRIS GAULLanguages 12,043 Items400 410 420 430 440 450 460 470 480 490
  • Design as CatalystArtist-in-ResidenceCHRIS GAULLanguages 12,043 Items400 410 420 430 440 450 460 470 480 490
  • Design as CatalystArtist-in-ResidenceCHRIS GAULLinguistics 1,918 Items410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 Social linguistics and literacies: ideology in discourses Author: Barker, David Publisher: Oxford University Press Format: Print Subject: Linguistics Social Linguistics Availability: City Campus 412.2BARK Available City Campus 412.2BARK Recently Returned City Campus 412.2BARK Due 23 FEB This book is recommended by 14 people Recommend this book
  • THANKSDESIGN AS CATALYSTFOR UTS:CI LABS UTS: LIBRARY@malbooth July, 2012