0
SIGNIFICANTSIGNIFICANT
LEARNINGLEARNING
We Are Teaching. Are They Learning?We Are Teaching. Are They Learning?
Patricia Ca...
SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING
OUTLINEOUTLINE
• What is learning?What is learning?
• Fink’s Taxonomy for Signifi...
SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING
What Is Learning?What Is Learning?
Bloom’s Taxonomy states that learning takesBlo...
SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING
Dr. L. Dee Fink builds on that platform and adds theDr. L. Dee Fink builds on tha...
SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING
WHAT ARE LEARNING STYLES?WHAT ARE LEARNING STYLES?
Different approaches or ways o...
SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING
WHAT ARE YOUR PREFERREDWHAT ARE YOUR PREFERRED
LEARNING STYLES?LEARNING STYLES?
A...
SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING
QUESTION:QUESTION:
How do you prefer to process information?How do you prefer to ...
SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING
QUESTION:QUESTION:
What type of information do you preferentially perceive?What t...
SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING
QUESTION:QUESTION:
Through which modality is sensoryThrough which modality is sen...
SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING
QUESTION:QUESTION:
How do you progress toward understanding?How do you progress t...
SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING
TEACHING STYLESTEACHING STYLES
Is Your Teaching Style Balanced?Is Your Teaching S...
SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING
Does your classroom provide:Does your classroom provide:
Pictures, diagrams, flow...
SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING
Does our classroom provide:Does our classroom provide:
Discussion, small group wo...
SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING
Does your classroom provide:Does your classroom provide:
• Linear progression of ...
SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING
Multiple Activities That Promote: Active LearningMultiple Activities That Promote...
SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING
DIRECT ACTIVITIESDIRECT ACTIVITIES
Getting information and ideas:Getting informat...
SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING
INDIRECT, VICARIOUS ACTIVITIESINDIRECT, VICARIOUS ACTIVITIES
Getting information ...
SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING
ONLINE ACTIVITIESONLINE ACTIVITIES
Getting Information and Ideas:Getting Informat...
SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING
REFERENCESREFERENCES
Web-sites:Web-sites:
www.collab.orgwww.collab.org (Collabora...
SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING
Collaboration Project Professional Development Conference:Collaboration Project P...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Significant Learning

6,875

Published on

PRESENTACIÓN DE LA SESIÓN II DEL MÓDULO I DEL DIPLOMADO ¿CÓMO APLICAR ESTRATEGIAS DE APRENDIZAJE SIGNIFICATIVO EN EL AULA?

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
6,875
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
64
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • See Figure 2.1 from Dr. Fink’s Article in the handout plus his article in the reference section
  • Use this chart to plot your own preferences.
  • From Building Motivation: Do You Have The Tools? Connie Evenson and Michelle Gierach from The Univsersity of South Dakota
    Mark your preferred style on the associated handout
  • Additional references are in the handout.
  • Transcript of "Significant Learning"

    1. 1. SIGNIFICANTSIGNIFICANT LEARNINGLEARNING We Are Teaching. Are They Learning?We Are Teaching. Are They Learning? Patricia Casello D.C.Patricia Casello D.C. Assistant Professor, NWHSUAssistant Professor, NWHSU January 18, 2007January 18, 2007
    2. 2. SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING OUTLINEOUTLINE • What is learning?What is learning? • Fink’s Taxonomy for Significant LearningFink’s Taxonomy for Significant Learning • Learning StylesLearning Styles • Teaching StylesTeaching Styles • Activities That Promote Active LearningActivities That Promote Active Learning • ReferencesReferences
    3. 3. SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING What Is Learning?What Is Learning? Bloom’s Taxonomy states that learning takesBloom’s Taxonomy states that learning takes place within three domains:place within three domains: Cognitive, Affective and PsychomotorCognitive, Affective and Psychomotor
    4. 4. SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING Dr. L. Dee Fink builds on that platform and adds theDr. L. Dee Fink builds on that platform and adds the following to indicate Significant Learning (Fink’sfollowing to indicate Significant Learning (Fink’s Taxonomy):Taxonomy): • Foundational KnowledgeFoundational Knowledge • ApplicationApplication • IntegrationIntegration • Human DimensionHuman Dimension • CaringCaring • Learning How To LearnLearning How To Learn
    5. 5. SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING WHAT ARE LEARNING STYLES?WHAT ARE LEARNING STYLES? Different approaches or ways of learning such as:Different approaches or ways of learning such as: • VisualVisual • AuditoryAuditory • KinestheticKinesthetic
    6. 6. SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING WHAT ARE YOUR PREFERREDWHAT ARE YOUR PREFERRED LEARNING STYLES?LEARNING STYLES? Active ----------------------PassiveActive ----------------------Passive Sensory---------------------IntuitiveSensory---------------------Intuitive Visual-----------------------VerbalVisual-----------------------Verbal Sequential------------------GlobalSequential------------------Global
    7. 7. SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING QUESTION:QUESTION: How do you prefer to process information?How do you prefer to process information? STYLES OF LEARNING:STYLES OF LEARNING: ActivelyActively – Through engagement in physical– Through engagement in physical activity or discussion, working in groupsactivity or discussion, working in groups PassivelyPassively – Through introspection, prefer working– Through introspection, prefer working along or with a single familiar partneralong or with a single familiar partner
    8. 8. SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING QUESTION:QUESTION: What type of information do you preferentially perceive?What type of information do you preferentially perceive? STYLES OF LEARNING:STYLES OF LEARNING: SensorySensory – Sights, sounds, physical sensations.– Sights, sounds, physical sensations. concrete thinker, practical, orientatedconcrete thinker, practical, orientated toward facts and procedures.toward facts and procedures. IntuitiveIntuitive – Memories, ideas, insights. Abstract thinker,– Memories, ideas, insights. Abstract thinker, innovative, oriented toward theories andinnovative, oriented toward theories and underlying meanings.underlying meanings.
    9. 9. SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING QUESTION:QUESTION: Through which modality is sensoryThrough which modality is sensory information most effectively perceived?information most effectively perceived? STYLES OF LEARNING:STYLES OF LEARNING: VisualVisual – By pictures, diagrams, graphs,– By pictures, diagrams, graphs, demonstrationsdemonstrations VerbalVerbal – By sounds, written and spoken words– By sounds, written and spoken words and formulasand formulas
    10. 10. SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING QUESTION:QUESTION: How do you progress toward understanding?How do you progress toward understanding? SequentiallySequentially – In a logical progression of small– In a logical progression of small incremental stepsincremental steps GloballyGlobally – In large jumps, holistically– In large jumps, holistically
    11. 11. SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING TEACHING STYLESTEACHING STYLES Is Your Teaching Style Balanced?Is Your Teaching Style Balanced? Does your classroom provide:Does your classroom provide: Facts, predictability, repetition, memorization, and opportunityFacts, predictability, repetition, memorization, and opportunity to connect what students are learning to practical life experience?to connect what students are learning to practical life experience? ANDAND Abstraction, theory, innovative thinking, imagination and variety?Abstraction, theory, innovative thinking, imagination and variety?
    12. 12. SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING Does your classroom provide:Does your classroom provide: Pictures, diagrams, flow charts, graphs, andPictures, diagrams, flow charts, graphs, and concept maps?concept maps? ANDAND Written and spoken explanations?Written and spoken explanations?
    13. 13. SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING Does our classroom provide:Does our classroom provide: Discussion, small group work, problem-Discussion, small group work, problem- solving activities?solving activities? ANDAND 1 minute papers, time for reflection, and the1 minute papers, time for reflection, and the muddiest points?muddiest points?
    14. 14. SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING Does your classroom provide:Does your classroom provide: • Linear progression of information?Linear progression of information? ANDAND • An overview of information prior to the smaller pieces?An overview of information prior to the smaller pieces? • A time to connect the pieces together for students?A time to connect the pieces together for students? • Information that connects to other disciplines andInformation that connects to other disciplines and subjects?subjects?
    15. 15. SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING Multiple Activities That Promote: Active LearningMultiple Activities That Promote: Active Learning • DirectDirect • Indirect, VicariousIndirect, Vicarious • OnlineOnline
    16. 16. SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING DIRECT ACTIVITIESDIRECT ACTIVITIES Getting information and ideas:Getting information and ideas: Original data and sourcesOriginal data and sources Experience:Experience: Activities done in authentic settings and/or directActivities done in authentic settings and/or direct observation of phenomenaobservation of phenomena Reflective Dialogue:Reflective Dialogue: Reflective thinking, journaling for selfReflective thinking, journaling for self Live dialogue in class, online or out of classLive dialogue in class, online or out of class
    17. 17. SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING INDIRECT, VICARIOUS ACTIVITIESINDIRECT, VICARIOUS ACTIVITIES Getting information and ideas:Getting information and ideas: Secondary data and sources, lectures, textbooksSecondary data and sources, lectures, textbooks Experience:Experience: Case studies, gaming, simulations, role playingCase studies, gaming, simulations, role playing Viewing or listening to stories, film, literature,Viewing or listening to stories, film, literature, or oral historyor oral history Reflective Dialogue:Reflective Dialogue: Reflective thinking and journaling with selfReflective thinking and journaling with self Live dialogue with others in class, online or out of classLive dialogue with others in class, online or out of class
    18. 18. SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING ONLINE ACTIVITIESONLINE ACTIVITIES Getting Information and Ideas:Getting Information and Ideas: Course web-sites, internet web-sites (i.e. journals)Course web-sites, internet web-sites (i.e. journals) Experience:Experience: Students directly experience …(online concept testing,Students directly experience …(online concept testing, participation in a group or team activity)participation in a group or team activity) Students can engage in “indirect” experiences (view a film, readStudents can engage in “indirect” experiences (view a film, read a case study)a case study) Reflective Dialogue:Reflective Dialogue: Various online dialogues such as e-mail, chat rooms, whiteVarious online dialogues such as e-mail, chat rooms, white boards and discussion boards/forums.boards and discussion boards/forums.
    19. 19. SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING REFERENCESREFERENCES Web-sites:Web-sites: www.collab.orgwww.collab.org (Collaboration Project web-site)(Collaboration Project web-site) www.ou.edu/idp/significantwww.ou.edu/idp/significant (Dr. Fink’s taxonomy-in the handout)(Dr. Fink’s taxonomy-in the handout)
    20. 20. SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGSIGNIFICANT LEARNING Collaboration Project Professional Development Conference:Collaboration Project Professional Development Conference: Motivating Students for Better Retention, learning and AchievementMotivating Students for Better Retention, learning and Achievement November 17-18, 2006 BloomingtonNovember 17-18, 2006 Bloomington Presentations:Presentations: Creating Significant Learning Experiences Through Integrated Course DesignCreating Significant Learning Experiences Through Integrated Course Design Stewart Ross, Director, Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning ,Stewart Ross, Director, Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning , Minnesota State University, MankatoMinnesota State University, Mankato Building Motivation: Do You Have The Tools?Building Motivation: Do You Have The Tools? Connie Evenson, Assistant professor, Department of Nursing, U of South DakotaConnie Evenson, Assistant professor, Department of Nursing, U of South Dakota Michelle Gierach, Assistant Professor, Department of Nursing, U of South DakotaMichelle Gierach, Assistant Professor, Department of Nursing, U of South Dakota The Road To Excellence: Creating Positive Learning EnvironmentsThe Road To Excellence: Creating Positive Learning Environments Heidi Johnson-Anderson, Assistant Professor, Department of Nursing, U of SDHeidi Johnson-Anderson, Assistant Professor, Department of Nursing, U of SD Susan Reinhart, Assistant Professor, Department of Nursing, U of SDSusan Reinhart, Assistant Professor, Department of Nursing, U of SD Dawn Warren, Assistant Professor, Department of Nursing, U of SDDawn Warren, Assistant Professor, Department of Nursing, U of SD Debate This! Critical Thinking and Content and Mastery Part 2Debate This! Critical Thinking and Content and Mastery Part 2 Dean Pape, Assistant Professor of Communication, Ripon CollegeDean Pape, Assistant Professor of Communication, Ripon College
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×