SpirOnto: Semantically Enhanced Patient Records for Reflective Learning on Spiritual Care in Palliative Care

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Presentation on http://spironto.de at ARTEL 2013 Workshop on Awareness & Reflection at ECTEL 2013, Paphos, Cyprus, September 17, 2013

Presentation on http://spironto.de at ARTEL 2013 Workshop on Awareness & Reflection at ECTEL 2013, Paphos, Cyprus, September 17, 2013

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  • 1. SpirOnto: Semantically Enhanced Patient Records for Reflective Learning on Spiritual Care in Palliative Care ARTEL Workshop 2013, Paphos, Cyprus Christine Kunzmann, Traugott Roser, Andreas Schmidt, Tanja Stiehl
  • 2. http://spironto.de 2Sep 2013 Motivation  Palliative care is a multi-professional environment  Doctors  Nurses  Chaplains/Spiritual caregivers  Social workers  Patient record as „boundary object“  Information store and basis for decision making  Foundation for reflection („Supervision“)  Gaining evidence and insight into spirtual care
  • 3. Reflective practice  Demanding nature of child palliative care  Regular reflective practice in informal group sessions  Narratives about individual patients  Development of a deep and rich understanding of their work  At longer time intervals: institutionalized supervision http://spironto.de 3Sep 2013
  • 4. Spiritual care http://spironto.de 4Sep 2013  Culturally sensitive spiritual care is as important as medical and care in palliative situation  Currently, however, spiritual care is not seen as a systematic approach with observable effects (as medicine or care)  For a basis for a systematic approach, an concept network („ontology“) was created which was derived from existing documentation  Facilitates finding gaps and possibilities for action beyond one‘s own profession
  • 5. Ontology development  Ontology developed based on 143 existing patient records (on paper, years 2004-2009)  Qualitative analysis  Formative evaluation of the resulting ontology with staff members with various backgrounds http://spironto.de 5Sep 2013
  • 6. Full ontology http://spironto.de 6Sep 2013
  • 7. Ontology  Facts about a patient or its social environment, demographics, disease/care status, cultural background  Observations that led to the identification of the facts (timestamp and a possibly rich description)  Spiritual concepts that interpret facts, such as eternity and finiteness, eternal love, guilt, purity, powerlessness vs. almightiness, or autonomy  context-dependent interpretations  Spiritual interventions are possible spiritual care activities, e.g., support, meaningful silence, pastoral interviews, practical consultancy, or rituals. http://spironto.de 7Sep 2013
  • 8. http://spironto.de 8
  • 9. http://spironto.de 9Sep 2013
  • 10. The System  Phased development  Summer 2013: First initial prototype developed for Windows Notebooks and Tablets  Intended as a proof of concept for getting feedback  Testing planned  Further development and larger scale evaluation planned for 2014 http://spironto.de 10Sep 2013
  • 11. http://spironto.de 11Sep 2013
  • 12. http://spironto.de 12Sep 2013
  • 13. Screenshot http://spironto.de 13Sep 2013
  • 14. Conclusions  Spiritual care is often belittled as lacking evidence of its effectiveness  Development of the ontology has already shown that spiritual care follows a systematic approach.  made visible through the general structure of the ontology: observations/facts, spiritual concepts as interpretations, and spiritual care interventions.  Workshops with physicians, social workers, and carers: can act as a boundary object between the disciplines and can create awareness about spiritual care and its relevance  First prototype with editing capabilities about to be tested, analysis and visualization planned for 2014  Also applicable in related fields, such as elderly care, or care for handicapped people http://spironto.de 14Sep 2013
  • 15. Team  Christine Kunzmann, Pontydysgu, UK kontakt@christine-kunzmann.de  Traugott Roser, University of Münster, Germany traugott.roser@uni-muenster.de  Andreas P. Schmidt, Karlsruhe University of Applied Sciences, Germany andreas_peter.schmidt@hs-karlsruhe.de  Tanja Stiehl, Center of Pediatric Palliative Care, LMU Munich, Germany tanja.stiehl@med.uni-muenchen.de http://spironto.de 15Sep 2013