• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Communitiy gardens
 

Communitiy gardens

on

  • 754 views

The project “Including the Elderly in Community Gardens” was designed to encourage this population group – senior citizens in their “golden years” – to participate in a variety of ...

The project “Including the Elderly in Community Gardens” was designed to encourage this population group – senior citizens in their “golden years” – to participate in a variety of activities in community gardens and nature sites around Jerusalem. Through these activities the project seeks to increase the active, voluntary participation of the elderly in the greening of Jerusalem, to raise their awareness and commitment to the environment, and to solidify their engaged participation as a cohesive group within the broader community.

The project was initiated and led by the Municipality of Jerusalem, JDC-ESHEL (the Association for the Planning and Development of Services for the Aged in Israel), the Jerusalem Foundation, the Ministry of Environmental Protection, and the Society for the Protection of Nature, with the participation of the Jerusalem Association of Community Councils and Idan, an NGO operating within this sector. (A full list of partners can be provided.)

Statistics

Views

Total Views
754
Views on SlideShare
547
Embed Views
207

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

4 Embeds 207

http://www.jiis.org.il 93
http://www.jiis.org 76
http://jiis.org 24
http://jiis.org.il 14

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • שילוב קשישים בגינות קהילתיות - מחקר ההערכה

Communitiy gardens Communitiy gardens Presentation Transcript

  • Evaluation Studies Integrating Seniors in Community Gardens The Jerusalem Institute for Israel Studies Dr. Maya Choshen
  • Jerusalem – A Unique City
    • Jerusalem’s many layers and features are constantly interweaving, resulting in a city that is truly one of a kind – splendid yet also complicated.
  • The Jerusalem Mosaic
    • The neighborhood structure of Jerusalem and the social and cultural richness of its residents
    • are part of its beauty and character… but they are also the source of its complexity and conflicts.
    • The population complexity
    • creates a broad spectrum of needs
    • Including the need to narrow the gaps between different population groups
    • Those who are similar tend to gather in “familiar” neighborhoods, while those who differ distance themselves geographically from one another.
    • In Jerusalem, this segregation is extremely clear among the three principal population sectors - the general Jewish population, the ultra-orthodox and the Arabs.
    • Even within this groups there is socio-economic diversity and a range of social needs.
    • The element that makes it possible for everyone to meet is the public space.
    • Community gardens exemplify the potential use of public space to integrate different population groups and reduce the gaps among them.
    • Nature and the environment are issues all residents in the city can relate to and these can be the basis for broad-based cooperation among different population groups that might not otherwise meet.
    • The structure of Jerusalem’s neighborhoods
    • enables gatherings in one public space relatively easily.
    • The city’s community gardens operate for this purpose as well as other purposes .
  • Community Gardens
    • Natural sites and green public areas dot Jerusalem, providing an infrastructure basis for beautifying the city and building partnerships among different groups.
  • Potential Key Changes Generated by Community Gardens
      • Through these sites, residents:
      • Strengthen their connection to the community and to the city,
      • Develop a sensitivity to preserving nature,
      • Incorporate all groups within the community into activities.
  • JIIS Evaluation Studies
    • So where do we come in?
    • For a decade now, JIIS has conducted Evaluation Studies of projects operating in Jerusalem, mainly:
      • Social
      • Welfare
      • Educational projects.
    • Between 6-8 projects are commissioned each year.
    • Evaluation studies are an important part of the Institute’s research basis. They assist in the following ways:
    • For project implementers to monitor
      • improve, and maintain the project;
    • For foundations, project initiators,
    • and other funding bodies
    • to assess the achievement of objectives
    • to understand possible avenues for
    • their continued involvement.
    • For us as researchers , evaluation
    • studies help to learn about :
      • changes in the city at the micro level;
      • connect the micro and macro levels
    • In evaluation studies we examine a given project multidimensionally, employing a wide range of research methods.
    • The evaluation study of the Community Garden project well illustrates our work.
  • Community Gardens - Background
    • The project was born of the principle that community gardens not only boost a neighborhood’s attractiveness, they also:
      • Stimulate social interaction.
      • Provide a useful learning tool to teach children and adults the concept and practice of community responsibility and cooperative behavior.
      • Serve as a neutral forum where activities can be created that connect local residents and, indeed, different communities throughout the city.
      • Provide urban city dwellers with a close and personal connection to nature.
    • A community garden is usually a joint initiative of people living in close proximity to each other and a local authority, business or organization for the purpose of creating a new garden or enhancing one that exists.
    • Each community garden reflects the specific wishes and needs of its surrounding population.
    • Jerusalem leads the country in the development of community gardens
    • The Community Gardens project initiated by the Jerusalem Municipality has been a resounding success. It has contributed to the quality of life of the city, has brought together diverse organizations and funding sources, and has led to an active “network of green communities.”
    • In Jerusalem, there are presently 33 active community gardens , spread over seventeen neighborhoods.
  • Integrating Seniors in Community Gardens
    • One of the primary target groups for the project was senior citizens, with the stated aims of:
    • Increasing their active, voluntary participation in the greening of Jerusalem;
    • Raise their awareness of and
    • commitment to the environment; and
    • Solidifying their participation
    • as a cohesive group within
    • the broader community.
    Elderly Community Communal Garden
      • It is grounded in the belief that integration of these elements will generate cooperation and cross-fertilization, which in turn will lead to an improved quality of life and more fruitful activities in each of the following spheres:
    • The communal aspect
    • The societal aspect
    • The inter-personal aspect
    • The environmental aspect
    • The educational/professional aspect
      • The communal aspect – Including the elderly in “green” communal activities and creating a communal dialogue between the elderly and retired, on the one hand, and “other communities,” on the other hand.
    • The societal aspect – Developing social-experiential activities within nature sites and neighborhoods in a range of areas relevant to the elderly and retired, with a link to the environment, environmental issues, and the community.
    • The inter-personal aspect – Generating activities for leisure time with a view to reducing feelings of loneliness and reinforcing a sense of communal belonging, as well as increasing elderly engagement in the cultivation of their residential surroundings.
    • The environmental aspect – Developing tools to improve the environment and the quality of life for the community in general and for the elderly in particular while, concurrently, making the values of the environment and nature more accessible at the residential level, forming links with and a sense of responsibility for the environment, and providing space to promote environmental engagement.
    • The educational/professional aspect – Increasing professional knowledge in the development of green communities and the integration of elderly into these communities, with a view to expanding this knowledge for the benefit of other cities and activities with other disenfranchised communities.
    • The project was initiated and led by the Municipality of Jerusalem, JDC-ESHEL (the Association for the Planning and Development of Services for the Aged in Israel), the Jerusalem Foundation, the Ministry of Environmental Protection, and the Society for the Protection of Nature, with the participation of the Jerusalem Association of Community Councils and Idan, an NGO operating within this sector.
    • Methodology
    • At the request of the Jerusalem Foundation, JIIS monitored the Community Gardens project for
    • . Our methodology was based on a range of qualitative and quantitative tools and techniques, including:
      • participation in steering committee and garden coordinators’ meetings;
      • return visits to all the gardens on weekly activity days;
      • one-on-one meetings with the coordinators ;
      • participant observations in the activities of the project;
      • observing activities in training courses;
      • distributing questionnaires to participants and evaluation reports to facilitators; and
      • analyzing the resulting data.
  • Integrating Seniors in Community Gardens
    • Among the most salient findings of this project is the indication of the success of the communal garden as a communal meeting place for people of various ages and various backgrounds with varying types of needs.
    • The evaluation study indicates that :
    • all participants benefited from the project ,
      • whether by cultivating personal surroundings,
      • creating social connections,
      • enjoying emotional enrichment,
      • or strengthening ties to the neighborhood .
    • The organizations that participated in the project experienced a learning process in matters relating to coping with aging .
    • The physical space itself showed a visible change .
  • Findings
    • Our research found that each of the participating organizations developed different models for integrating the elderly in community gardens and “green” activities.
    • In all, seven different models were developed to suit the different needs of each neighborhood and the elderly population within it:
    • Gardening group
    • Home-based group
    • Series of meetings – intended primarily
    • for exploration and increasing
    • participants’ awareness and
    • knowledge relating to
    • environmental issues.
    • 4. Community greenhouse – provides equipment and plantings for various groups active in the neighborhood.
    • 5. Gardening patrol Activities related to the “Weekly Day of Action in the Community Garden” (Gardening and social activities that enable the elderly population to participate actively and independently in community gardening).
    • 6. Activities related to the “Weekly Day of Action in the Community Garden”
    • 7. Home visits – designed for housebound elderly.
    • These models were developed to meet the needs of groups with different characteristics while taking into account such considerations as the needs of the neighborhood itself alongside existing infrastructures and resources. All considerations must be consolidated by the on-site coordinators, whose familiarity with the neighborhood, its existing infrastructures and resident populations is, therefore, extremely influential and significant.
  • The Challenges Ahead
    • While the project was rather successful, challenges still lie ahead that should be addressed in order to improve its efficacy. Among them:
    • The elderly do not comprise a homogenous community, but rather include a variety of age groups with differing needs and characteristics (e.g., mobility, physical limitations, or independence).
    • The needs and characteristics of the target population were not fully known – and should be evaluated in order to augment the project’s success in the future.
    • Coordination among the various professional
    • bodies remains difficult, particularly between
    • professionals from the elderly community and
    • professionals in the area of gardening.
  • Recommendations
    • The community should be divided into sub-groups according to specific characteristics and needs.
    • The relations among the professional bodies involved need to be strengthened, with a view to the needs of the elderly.
    • The needs of the neighborhood and those of the elderly within the neighborhood should be mapped and integrated.
    • Professional community workers, particularly those specializing in the needs of the elderly, should be included in and allowed to guide the project.
    • Community Health Promotion Program
    • for Elderly Women in Jerusalem
    • The project seeks to promote the health of underprivileged elderly women residents of the lower-class Katamonim neighborhood in Jerusalem. The first step in this project was to set up and train a network of volunteers who now work with the participants in the community.
    • The project strives to improve the status of the elderly women, to develop conditions and services to guarantee better their quality of life, and to improve the image of older people to society as a whole.
  • JIIS Evaluation Studies Integrating Seniors in Community Gardens Dr. Maya Choshen Thank you
  • Other JIIS Evaluation Studies
    • "The Community Believes in Education – Better Together"
    • This community education program began in 2000, based on the premise that within a community there is the strength, wisdom, knowledge and desire to ensure the education of neighborhood children and youth. jiis is examining
  • JIIS EVALUATION STUDIES
    • These studies have advantages both for the client requesting the study and those creating the project
    • They provide a broad data resource which accumulates with every additional project
    • The research approach is interdisciplinary and multidimensional, which is particularly suited to Jerusalem’s complex character
    • Through these studies JIIS has developed an ever-expanding network and professional ties with governmental and non-governmental organizations, municipal officials, experts, practitioners and public activists.
  • Aim of evaluation studies
    • To provide ongoing feedback and targeted assessments during the course of a project;
    • To identify strengths and weaknesses of a project during its initial and intermediate stages, and offer ideas for improvement and/or enhancement;
    • To measure a project’s success, based on stated objectives, and its contribution to the neighborhood in general and the target community in particular;
    • To assist the project’s designers and facilitators in defining project’s goals
    • To assist in a project’s diffusion and implementation
  • Research approaches
        • Evaluation based on active involvement
        • Evaluation based on participation
        • Evaluation based on initiative
        • Compilation of different research approaches based on a project's specific aims
    • Combining qualitative and quantitative research
    • Active participation in steering committee and working committee meetings
    • Distribution of questionnaires
    • In-depth interviews with
    • professionals
    • activists
    • project facilitators and other persons involved in the project
    • participant observation
    • Analysis of documentation
    • Measurements of success
  • End products
    • Interim and final reports
    • Ongoing evaluation tailored to the project in general and the changing needs at different stages
    • Support and assistance in expanding the partnerships associated with the project in the city
    • it is important to integrate and strengthen the weak and underprivileged population.
    • At the same time, a strong [primary?? broad??] population is needed to ensure the city’s standard of living, which in turn contributes to the strengthening of its weaker population.
    • Nhu,r
    • While each garden is unique, it was decided to create a “network of community gardens” to multiply the effect and efficacy of the project.
    • The objective was achieved: to promote community-based activities that would contribute to the quality of life for all social strata, but particularly youth, special needs populations, seniors, new immigrants and educational institutions.
  • Integrating Seniors in Community Gardens
    • This project integrates three core spheres
      • the elderly population, but what about youth, education etc… referred to on slide #19??
      • community
      • communal gardens.
  • Findings
    • Our research found that each of the participating organizations developed different models for integrating the elderly in community gardens and “green” activities. In all, seven different models were developed to suit the different needs of each neighborhood and the elderly population within it:
    • Gardening group (East Talpiot, NETA team – Jerusalem Bird Observatory) – operates in the community garden, intended only for the elderly, with activities focused primarily on gardening and garden aesthetics. something not quite clear here – will discuss with you..
    • Home-based group (Lev Ha’ir Community Council, Ginot Ha’ir Community Council) – operates in a community center or within the home of one of the elderly participants, designed for a fixed group of seniors who meet regularly. Activities are social in nature and include emotional and spiritual support. Some of the home-based groups address “green” issues and have a connection with a nearby community garden.
    • Series of meetings (Jerusalem Bird Observatory) – A fixed number of meetings intended primarily for exploration and increasing participants’ awareness and knowledge relating to environmental issues. These operate in senior citizen centers and retirement homes and are designed for members or residents.
    • Community greenhouse (Lev Ha’ir Community Council) – Provides equipment and plantings for various groups active in the neighborhood as well as a meeting place for inter-generational activities. Includes gardening and social activities.
    • Gardening patrol (Lev Ha’ir Community Council) – Gardening and social activities for young men and women in national service, in cooperation with the program for home visits.
    • Activities related to the “Weekly Day of Action in the Community Garden” (Lev Ha’ir Community Council, Ginot Ha’ir Community Council) – Gardening and social activities that enable the elderly population to participate actively and independently in community gardening.
    • Home visits (Lev Ha’ir Community Council, Ginot Ha’ir Community Council) – Designed for housebound elderly, this is primarily a social and aesthetic activity. Both independent senior citizens and youth take part in these activities.
  • מוקדי הפעילות ומספר הקשישים שהשתתפו בפעילויות במסגרת קבוצתית בכל אחד מהאתרים ( לא כולל קשישים שהגיעו באופן עצמאי לפעילויות השבועית בגינות הקהילתיות ) שילוב קשישים בגינות קהילתיות מחקרי הערכה מכון ירושלים לחקר ישראל