iPads in Education: In-Depth

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Introductory slide deck for a hands-on session at John Carroll University - May 2013

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iPads in Education: In-Depth

  1. 1. TECHNOLOGY  
  2. 2. LITERACY  
  3. 3. TRADITIONAL  LITERACIES  
  4. 4. NEW  LITERACIES  
  5. 5. CHILDREN  
  6. 6. ANALOG  
  7. 7. DIGITAL  
  8. 8. SHIFT  
  9. 9. Used  with  permission  from  Dr.  Alec  Couros,  University  of  Regina,  h=p://educa@onaltechnology.ca/couros/    
  10. 10. Used  with  permission  from  Dr.  Alec  Couros,  University  of  Regina,  h=p://educa@onaltechnology.ca/couros/    
  11. 11. THE  CLOUD  
  12. 12. What  Do  We  Know?  
  13. 13. “When  used  inten@onally  and  appropriately,  technology  and  interac@ve  media  are  effec@ve  tools  to  support  learning  and  development.”  NAEYC  and  Fred  Rogers  Center  Joint  PosiCon  Statement    (2011)    
  14. 14. Literacy  Affordances  Computer-­‐based  learning  ac@vi@es  in  language  ac@vi@es  seemed  to  induce  greater  levels  of  collabora@on  and  discussions  (Dickenson,  1986)  The  dynamic  nature  of  mul@media  seemed  to  help  children  to  create  mental  models  more  effec@vely  and  improved  comprehension  (Kamil  et  al.,  2000)  Using  computer  soRware  seems  to  benefit  the  learning  of  special  popula@ons,  such  as  ESL,  learning  disabili@es  and  young  children  (Kamil  et  al.,  2000)  The  use  of  computers  in  reading  and  wri@ng  seemed  to  mo@vate  children  more  effec@vely  (Kamil  et  al.,  2000)  Affordances  of  EducaConal  Technologies  
  15. 15. Social  Affordances  Children  are  highly  mo@vated  in  computer  environments  and  they  enjoy  sharing  their  experiences  and  strategies  with  each  other  (Blanton  et  al.,  2000)  Children  exhibit  a  rich  versa@lity  of  social  interac@ons  at  the  computer  (HeR  and  Swaminathan,  2002)  (Brooker,  2002)  found  that  peers  frequently  supported  each  other  in  the  learning  process  &  children  benefited  from  “mutually  suppor@ve  collabora@on.”  The  manipula@on  of  shapes  and  symbols  on  screen  represents  a  new  form  of  symbolic  play.  Children  treat  digital  ar@facts  as  “concretely”  as  they  do  physical  play  objects  (Brooker,  2002)    Affordances  of  EducaConal  Technologies  
  16. 16. shiR  
  17. 17. Used  with  permission  from  Dr.  Alec  Couros,  University  of  Regina,  h=p://educa@onaltechnology.ca/couros/    
  18. 18. Used  with  permission  from  Dr.  Alec  Couros,  University  of  Regina,  h=p://educa@onaltechnology.ca/couros/    
  19. 19. Used  with  permission  from  Dr.  Alec  Couros,  University  of  Regina,  h=p://educa@onaltechnology.ca/couros/    
  20. 20. Used  with  permission  from  Dr.  Alec  Couros,  University  of  Regina,  h=p://educa@onaltechnology.ca/couros/    
  21. 21. SOURCE:  h=p://tpack.org          TPACK  
  22. 22. Where  Do  We  Start?  
  23. 23. THE  CLASSROOM  
  24. 24. THE  CLASSROOM  
  25. 25. Physical    Space  (Classroom)  Physical  Space  (Classroom)  Digital    Space  Core  Skills  New  Context  Learning  Space  formal  informal  synchronous  asynchronous  Developed  by  Mr.  David  Jakes.  Used  with  permission.  
  26. 26. LEARNING  SPACES  
  27. 27. How  Do  We  Do  It?  
  28. 28. +  
  29. 29. APPS  SOURCE:  h=p://www.educatorstechnology.com/2012/12/ipad-­‐apps-­‐classified-­‐by-­‐samr-­‐model.html    
  30. 30. HANDS  ON  WITH  THE  IPAD  
  31. 31. What  We  Will  Do  1.  Collect  digital  photographs  2.  Capture  digital  audio  3.  Make  a  digital  video  4.  Record  a  podcast  5.  Create  an  ebook  6.  Share  your  digital  learning  

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