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Bonnie Braun Rubric #PriesterHealth 2013
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Bonnie Braun Rubric #PriesterHealth 2013

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  • 1. Using Rubrics to Enhance Extension Program Planning and Evaluation: A Health Insurance Literacy Example Bonnie Braun, PhD Professor, Department of Family ScienceSpecialist, University of Maryland Extension Faculty Scholar, Horowitz Center for Health Literacy University of Maryland bbraun@umd.edu
  • 2. Rubrics
  • 3. Why Rubrics? Encourages consistent and thorough evaluation Assists in evaluation of existing and new programs, curricula and educational materials Permits multiple individuals to make judgments using common definitions
  • 4. University of Maryland Health SmartHealth Insurance Literacy Initiative(HILI)  Emergent area for education  Strives to enhance the confidence and competence of consumers in making health insurance purchasing decisions  Targets both those who already purchase insurance and those newly eligible for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act  From Maryland-only to multi-state initiative  Pilot testing launched April 1, 2013
  • 5. Design Specifications &Products Comprehensive, systematic process* Health literacy principles Science Theory *Coleman, et al, 2011
  • 6. What did we create?1. Program Assessment Tool©2. Curriculum Assessment Tool©3. Materials Assessment Tool©
  • 7. Curriculum Assessment Tool Curriculum Assessment Tool -- provides a standardized set of criteria to evaluate existing educational curricula and to use in creating new educational curricula. Uses a four-point scale (Effective, Good, Fair, and Ineffective) Based on recommendations of Extension educators who provided a rationale for curricula review* *Coleman et al, (2011)
  • 8. Educational Materials Tool Educational Materials Assessment Tool -- provides a standardized set of criteria to judge educational materials used in programs and in curricula. Can be used both for critiquing existing educational materials and creating new materials. Based on Doak et al (2007) which provides a standardized way to analyze materials for learners with varying levels of prose, document and quantitative literacy.
  • 9. How did we create them? The role of theory… Both rubrics grounded in theoretical principles of adult learning, health literacy, health behavior WHY?  Application of theory to educational interventions increases the likelihood that intended outcomes will be achieved;  Theories provide the rationale for how the intervention is strategically structured and delivered; and  Theories offer the basis for assessment of the program’s degree of success in achieving intended outcomes. Braun, et al (forthcoming)
  • 10. How did we create them? The roleof theory…  Depends on situation, targeted population, understanding of behavior change and determination of outcomes that are strategic, measurable, achievable, relevant and timely*  Level of intervention—individual, family or other group, community or policy—will guide the appropriate programming theories.  For the Health Insurance Literacy Initiative curriculum, we used individual-level theories: social cognitive theory, stages of change or readiness, theory of planned behavior, communications, adult or youth development, empowerment, and evaluation and action research *Doran, 1981
  • 11. How did we create them? The role of theory… Key theoretical concepts can be combined into a model that frames the design and measurement of educational programming impact. The theories we selected directed us to:  Involve the targeted population  Identify the level of confidence, competence and sense of control before and after interventions.  Create messages and deliver via appropriate channels  Design learning experiences to increase critical thinking and reflection.  Assure that evaluation of need, process and outcome is effectively conducted and reported.
  • 12. How can you use these tools? Language of the rubrics could be substituted with appropriate vocabulary for the curricula content under review. May need revise based on the level of intervention (family, individual, community) and the intent or goals of the program. May need other theories to guide the development of programs and assessment tools if not focused on change-making.
  • 13. Let’s practice…1. Find your copy of the Educational Materials Assessment Tool and the Scoring Sheet2. Review the provided document3. Complete the scoring sheet as it relates to the material
  • 14. Questions for discussion: What are your thoughts about the material after using the rubric guidelines to assess it? In what ways did you find the rubric useful in guiding your evaluation of the material?
  • 15. Coming Soon
  • 16. References Braun, B., McCoy, T., & Finkbeiner, N. (In press). Extension Education Theoretical Guide with Criterion- Referenced Assessment Tools. College Park: University of Maryland Extension Coleman, G., Byrd-Bredbenner, C., Baker, S., & Bowen, E. (2011). Best practices for extension curricula review. Journal of Extension, 49, Article 2T0T1. Available at: http://www.joe.org/joe/2011april/tt1.php Doak, C.C., Doak, L.G., & Root, J.H. (2007). Teaching patients with low literacy skills. (2nd ed.). Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott Company. Doran, G. T. (1981). There’s a S.M.A.R.T. way to write management’s goals and objectives. Management Review, 70, 35-36.
  • 17. AcknowledgementThis presentation and the rubrics were co-createdwith Nicole Finkbeiner, MS, GraduateResearch Assistant, University of MarylandDepartment of Family Sciences.