Ccc08 Hannah Rudman
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Ccc08 Hannah Rudman

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Ccc08 Hannah Rudman Ccc08 Hannah Rudman Presentation Transcript

  • The Festival Audience as Players Creative Clusters ‘08 Hannah Rudman [email_address] www.del.icio.us/hanrudman
  • “We-think”
    • “ We-Think: the power of mass creativity is about what the
    • rise of the likes of Wikipedia and Youtube, Linux and
    • Craigslist means for the way we organise ourselves, not just
    • in digital businesses but in schools and hospitals, cities and
    • mainstream corporations. My argument is that these new
    • forms of mass, creative collaboration announce the arrival
    • of a society in which participation will be the key organising
    • idea rather than consumption and work. People want to be
    • players not just spectators, part of the action,
    • not on the sidelines.”
      • Charles Leadbeater, thinker and author.
      • www.wethinkthebook.net
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  • Experience Economy / Status Stories
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  • People want to do more than attend
    • Personalise
    • Participate
    • Co-produce
    • Create meaning
      • Alan Brown’s latest research: WolfBrown
    • This affects:
      • Artistic practice
      • Organisations’ operations
      • Business models
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  • Implications for organisations
      • ARTISTIC
        • people's online lives and digital devices become part of real experience – venues and other audience members may have to change their attitudes to their inclusion;
        • participating in public spaces or t h e city, or in virtual spaces changes a person’s relationship to those environments – this is an opportunity to link better with tourism aims and objectives;
        • the relationship between the artist and community will become flatter - artists and audiences will begin to develop work collaboratively;
        • people will be organised without the organisation, players without the play;
      • OPERATIONAL
        • encouraging more personalisation of and participation with the festivals experience via digital tools and channels means increasing investment in this area;
        • becoming more porous as organisations means opening up to a wide dialogue, including the negative and critical;
      • BUSINESS MODELS
        • creating more digital content means more/different investment and different contracts with venues, performers and audiences.
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  • Implications for funders
    • traditional delineations between traditional art forms are blurring as artists work with more digital media and new forms of digital production and consumption – to what d e partment should artists apply?
    • projects may only come together in final form on the day and results may be surprising, even unexpected!
    • power laws (1:9:90) in relation to UGC digital content and participation need to be recognized, particularly their potential for audience building
    • a fine art critique may not be the only way to get something out of a piece of work designed to be solely digital and/or highly audience participative
    • the experience economy is upon us, and we need to emphasize the fact what we do well as a cultural sector is deliver unique, exciting and transformative experiences