Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
10 24Soc_Roles
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

10 24Soc_Roles

391
views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
391
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Elements of Social Structure: statuses social roles groups social networks social institutions
  • 2. def. “role”:
    • A social role is a pattern of
    • expected behavior.
  • 3. Role Theory is based on the following assumptions:
    • People spend much of their lives in groups .
    • Within these groups, people often take over distinct functions and occupy discernible positions .
    • With specific functions and specific positions come specific expectations for behavior ; regular pattern of such expectations can be called roles .
    • People are generally conformists: we learn to conform to roles.
    • The anticipation of rewards and punishments inspire this conformity.
  • 4. Our school — social roles student teacher administrator staff parent
  • 5. Our school — social roles teacher administrator staff parent
    • student — role differentiations:
    • the willing learner
    • the hard worker
    • the challenging rebel
    • the obedient follower
  • 6. Our school — social roles student
    • the role of teacher — differentiations:
    • experienced vs. new teacher
    • strict teacher, mean teacher, soft teacher
    administrator staff parent
  • 7. How do we know the roles?
  • 8. How do we know what is expected from us in specific roles? How do we know what to expect from others?
  • 9. Socialization.
    • George Herbert Mead:
    • preparatory stage
      • children start to imitate adults and other children, which prepares them for playing roles
    • play stage
      • child takes on someone else’s role
    • game stage
      • child plays a role and takes into account that co-players are also playing roles
  • 10. Socialization into roles:
    • For each role, we learn
    • norms of expected behavior
    • sanctions (positive and negative) that we may expect when we fill out or fail to fill out a role (i.e., conform to or break a norm), and that we dole out when someone else does or does not do what we expect them to do in their role.
  • 11. Socialization into roles:
    • For many roles, we also learn to
    • adapt our language , and
    • associate the role with specific values .
    • (e.g., while I play the role of customer on a market, I’m driven by values that differ from those that guide my behavior as a friend, or as a husband, or as a father, or as a teacher.)
  • 12. Role Conflict
    • Whereas for the most part, we are highly skilled at juggling different roles and switching from one role to the other,
    • we sometimes get into situations where we are assigned two (or more) different roles at once —
    • and sometimes, these roles may contain contradictory expectations.
  • 13. The Social Construction of Reality
    • Again: where do all the scripts for all those “roles” exist?
    • Where do all these sets of expectations reside?
    • Where do we find all those norms?
  • 14. The Social Construction of Reality
    • Where do all the scripts for all those “roles” exist?
    • Where do all these sets of expectations reside?
    • Where do we find all those norms?
    • In people’s minds .
    • And they all depend on people’s individual perspectives .