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Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
Indian Youth and climate change
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Indian Youth and climate change

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This book attempts to address the movement of the Young Indians who want fight against the environment crisis facing the global world, who have ideas and solutions.

This book attempts to address the movement of the Young Indians who want fight against the environment crisis facing the global world, who have ideas and solutions.

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  • 1. Indian Youth andClimate Change Edited byVikram Aditya and Anugraha John
  • 2. Published byGlobal Citizens for Sustainable Development, Bangalore, India.October, 20082
  • 3. CONTENTPrefaceSection I 1 - Youth Declaration - Report of the Indian Youth Summit on Climate Change - Summit Programme Schedule - Profile of all Organizations/Sponsors/ Supporting Partners/Speakers/Youth Organizers of IYSoCC - Participants ListSection II - Appendices - Report of the workshop on ‘Intergenerational Partnerships on Climate Change’ - Charter of Human Responsibilities 3
  • 4. 4
  • 5. PrefaceThe most recent assessment report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Changeobserved that changes in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and aerosols,land cover and solar radiation alter the energy balance of the climate system, andconcluded that increases in anthropogenic greenhouse gas concentrations are very likelyto have caused most of the increases in global average temperatures since the mid-20thcentury. It is also an accepted fact today that human activities have increased theconcentration of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases.Climate change has emerged as the most threatening issue for the 21st century not justfor India but for the entire world. We shouldn’t be wasting any more time playing blamegames and pointing fingers at each other as to who is responsible for the presentcircumstances. Developed and industrialized countries should henceforth responsiblytake the lead, towards mitigation and adaptation of the same and support the leastdeveloped countries facing the brunt of global warming. It is high time that we reflectand act in order to proceed with sustainable development process for a safer environmentand a better future.I would’nt want to get into the debate as to whether India has or has not done much incontributing to the global carbon emissions; but the fact that it now remains under thescanner by both, the critics and the global citizens due to its current status of beingworld’s fifth largest emitter of greenhouse gases. We have to seriously do somethingabout it.India signed the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) on10th June 1992 and ratified the same on 1st November 1993. The Kyoto Protocol to theUNFCCC was adopted in 1997 which was also ratified by India in August 2002. India isnow among the 185 countries that is committed to the Kyoto protocol.India, the second largest population in the world is not far behind China to become thenumber one and this could possibly happen by 2030 if the current trend continues. Atone end, India is still dealing with issues such as poverty, illiteracy and others and at theother end to have global recognition, India’s development and economic growth hasbecome fundamental. There is a constant pressure for India by other competitive countrieslike China, Philippines and others in Asia to not only maintain their present GDP but toalso increase it swiftly. In the next couple of decade, the transition from a developing 5
  • 6. country to a developed country with the increase in population will only demand greaterenergy requirements for India. As it is today, most of India’s present energy demand ismet through burning of fossil fuels, most prominently coal. And nuclear energy is nogood too. In India, the Ministry of Environment is the nodal agency since 1999 for climate changerelated activities. The Ministry of Non-Conventional Energy was renamed as the Ministryof New and Renewable Energy in 2006 which now has a target of 10% allotment of thecountry’s energy requirements to be met by alternative energy by the year 2012.With this background we realized that the role of young Indians (under the age of 35 -almost 60% of the total population) is very vital. It is the youth of the country that willbring innovative and creative ideas into the forefront for an alternative developmentparadigm. The X-generation here in India is confident to bring the change they want tosee in India. With the exposure to vast knowledge and new technologies on their sidethey have the ability to mobilize the Indian citizens for action.In November 2007 at the fourth International Conference on Environmental Education(ICEE) the youth at the workshop in order to fight climate change felt the need to sustainthe effort to integrate education into sustainable development. Participants acknowledgedthe need to create convergence amongst networks especially youth network into anAsian Citizens Alliance through steadfast and resolute action, in order to fight againstmany challenges faced by this gigantic and most populous continent. For issues such asclimate change it was felt necessary to propagate the values and principles of sustainabledevelopment.Taking inspiration from this common aspiration, Vikram Aditya and myself (facilitatorsfor the Youth and ESD workshop) at ICEE as a follow up, coordinated and brought togetherboth youth and adults at a common platform in Bangalore, India for a workshop on‘Intergenerational Partnerships for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation’, in April2008. It was at this workshop, one of the participants, Kartikeya Singh introduced hisideas and vision of the Indian Youth Climate Network. As joint-coordinators of theworkshop both Vikram and myself agreed to support and strengthen this network andwork towards an Asian Citizens Alliance by including many such networks in the alliance.This understanding was well received by both the participants and IYCN founder, KartikeyaSingh.At the conclusion of the April 2008 workshop it was decided that we need to mobilize6
  • 7. more young people to unite and work together for this cause. This led us to organizethe first Indian Youth Summit on Climate Change in Hyderabad from 7th – 10th August2008.This publication, Indian Youth and Climate Change is not only the documented report ofthese two programmes but more an effort to document the several discussions whichtook place over a period of almost one year among young and energetic Indians.We are thankful to Mr. Ram Esteeves (ADATS), Mr. Gopal Jain (SAYEN), Mr. Narayan Murthy(Infosys), Ms. Nisha Agarwal (Oxfam India), Dr. M. Prakamma (Friendship Foundation),Dr. Vandana Shiva (Navdanya), Dr. A.K. Pachauri (TERI), Mr. Nitin Desai (LEAD India), Mr.Gustavo Marin (Charles Leopold Mayer Foundation), Ms. Malini Mehra (Center for SocialMarkets), Mr. K. Pushpanath (Oxfam International) and many others who have supportedand guided us in our journey both individually and through their respective organisations.We also recognize the leadership and support of Rohan Parikh, Priya Pillai, Govind Singh,Kartikeya Singh, Deepa Gupta, Sumedha Malaviya, Sreepriya, Sonali, Caroline Howe,Alexis Ringwald, Bhavana Kaveti, Rabindra Biswas, Raji Nair, Digu Aruchamy, Will Batesand Vidya Subramanian in our journey to strengthen a youth movement in India on climatechange.We hope that as many participants from this Summit represent the young voice of Indiaat the upcoming Conference of Parties (CoP14) to be held in Poznan, Poland in December2008.Anugraha JohnDirector, Global Citizens for Sustainable Development 7
  • 8. ACRONYMS UNFCCC United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change IPCC Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change CoP Conference of Parties CDM Clean Development Mechanism GHG Green House Gases SEZ Special Economic Zones GIS Geographic Information Systems CFL Compact Fluorescent Lamp LED Light Emitting Diode GDP Gross Domestic Product ESD Education for Sustainable Development R&D Research and Development ADATS Agriculture Development and Training Society SAYEN South Asian Youth Environment Network GCSD Global Citizens for Sustainable Development IYCN Indian Youth Climate Network IYSoCC Indian Youth Summit on Climate Change TERI The Education Resources Institute WWF World Wide Fund CSM Center for Social Markets HCA Hyderabad Climate Alliance NBSS Nature and Biological Sciences Society KREDL Karnataka Renewable Energy Development Limited8
  • 9. Organisers CAMPAIGNS ® GALORE SponsorsSupporting Partners Asian Citizens Alliance 9
  • 10. Mr. Narayana Murthy, Chief Mentor of Infosys, addressing the gathering Participants in front of historic Charminar in Hyderabads famed old city10
  • 11. Youth Declaration at the Indian Youth Summit on Climate Change Youth 10 August 2008 thClimate change is the biggest threat to our generation’s future, and urgent action is required.I commit to working towards an India that: 1. Mitigates greenhouse gas emissions to protect India and the world from climate change impacts; specifically protecting existing natural ecosystems, old growth forests, wetlands and coastal vegetation. 2. Puts emphasis on human health, coastal and vulnerable communities, climate-induced displaced persons and biodiversity conservation. 3. Makes a swift transition from a carbon intensive economy to a green economy, alleviating poverty, increasing employment in sustainable sectors, and thus sustaining India’s rapid economic growth. 4. Is driven on a low carbon pathway to sustainable development by an ultimate atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration of 350ppm, and an India that is calling for international action on emission reduction. 5. Meets energy security through a clean, renewable, and low-carbon energy supply, with sustainable and efficient consumption of energy across sectors and uses. 6. Provides every Indian with access to fundamental services, including energy, clean air and water, and healthy food. 7. Increases awareness and provides education to every Indian on climate impacts, adaptation and mitigation across all disciplines, at every level, both in rural and urban India. 8. Provides strong incentives for Research and Development (R&D) and innovation in green technologies including building upon the strong indigenous knowledge traditions. 9. Includes youth representation at a local, state, national and international policy level on climate change. 10. Imposes a strong polluter pays principle both domestically and at an international level to ensure appropriate climate equity. Receipts from such a policy are to be directed towards funding clean development for the poorest in society. 11. Has a clean, enriched, peaceful, and sustainable future. I commit to: 1. Advocating this declaration 2. Engaging my friends, family and community members on this issue 3. Building a culture of sustainability 4. Taking action on climate change to the best of my ability, be it through individual change, community action, voting and consumer choice. 5. Leading India towards sustainability 11
  • 12. Youth Indian Youth Summit on Climate Change (IYSoCC)The Indian Youth Summit on Climate Change, held at the Infosys Technologies HyderabadDevelopment Center, Gachibowli, Hyderabad from the 7th to the 10th of August, 2008.The summit was organized by the Friendship Foundation (Hyderabad), Nature andBiological Sciences Society (Hyderabad), Global Citizens for Sustainable Development(Bangalore), Campaigns Galore (Hyderabad), and the Indian Youth Climate Network.Altogether, 139 delegates from fifteen different states, including delegates from Jammuand Kashmir and Meghalaya, attended the summit in Hyderabad. The list of delegates isfurnished at the end of the summit report.Sponsors: The chief sponsors of the summit were Infosys Technologies Limited, whokindly provided their Gachibowli Development Center as the venue for the summit andalso provided accommodation and food for all participants and organizers. They alsosupported logistical arrangements for the summit, including delegate security, VIP traveland accommodation, and local travel for delegates.Satyam Technologies Limited, Hyderabad, and Tetra Pak Limited also provided valuablefinancial support for the summit.Blue Cross of Hyderabad, an animal rescue and rehabilitation organization also cameforward with valuable financial contributions for the summit initially, and therefore enabledthe organizers to coordinate arrangements.Supporters:The supporting partners of the event were Lead India, a Delhi based center ofenvironmental research excellence and leadership, and the Oxfam India Trust, an affiliateof Oxfam International, the international humanitarian agency working on climate changeadaptation, sustainable development, trade justice and social equity globally. Therepresentatives of the supporters provided valuable inputs and advise throughout thesummit, and helped coordinate events throughout the programme.Objectives of the Summit:The expected outcomes of the summit were –1. A national youth charter on climate change in the form of a declaration, reflecting the voices and opinions of Indian youth on effective climate change mitigation and sustainable development12
  • 13. 2. A national youth action plan on climate change, which demonstrated the actions that young people wished to take and desired the government and industry to take in order to effectively mitigate climate change.3. To provide a platform for young people interested in climate change from across the country to interact, exchange ideas, views and experiences from each other. Report of P roceedings: Proceedings:DAY 1:The Indian Youth Summit on Climate Change commenced with an opening inauguralsession. Mr. Vikram Aditya, Programme Coordinator of Friendship Foundation andNational Coordinator of the summit began by delivering a welcome address to thegathering, where he explained how the idea of the summit initially came up and whatthe summit sought to achieve.Mr. Anugraha John introduced the two keynote speakers: Dr. Vandana Shiva andMr. Nitin Desai were speaking live with the kind support of video conferencing facilitiesfrom the TERI office in Delhi. Unfortunately, Dr. A.K. Pachauri couldn’t join them to addressthe youth participants.Mr. Nitin Desai, former Under SecretaryGeneral of the United Nations, spoke She said that after her generation, she wasabout the importance of youth coming wondering where the youth were for climatetogether to discuss and address climate action, and said that the summit and IYCNchange. He emphasized that there was a had been her Prozac – had given her newcomplete scientific consensus on the hope – that youth really do care and areissue of climate change being caused by committed to climate action.human activities, and that we all needed Vandana Shiva: (adapted quote)to unite to address the issue.Dr. Vandana Shiva, an eminent physicist, environmental activist, author and the founderof the Navdanya Institute, who spoke spoke about the three crises that are currentlycoinciding: the environmental crisis, the energy crisis and the global food crisis. Sheemphasized that by addressing agriculture and turning towards organic farming, Indiacould address all three of these crises. Organic agriculture is more adaptive towardsclimatic changes while also using less fossil fuels for fertilizer and pesticide production.Together they emphasized the need for young people to take leadership in environmental 13
  • 14. campaigning and decision-making, since young people were going to be most unfavorablyimpacted by climate change.Their presentations were followed by Q & A. During this session, Dr. Vandana Shiva saidthat after her generation, she was wondering where the youth were for climate action,and said that the summit and IYCN had been her Prozac – had given her new hope – thatyouth really do care and are committed to climate action.After this the floor was taken over by the three founders of the Indian Youth ClimateNetwork, Deepa Gupta, Kartikeya Singh and Govind Singh, who spoke about thebeginnings of the organization, the projects that IYCN is pursuing, and the vision for aunited Indian youth voice on climate change. In the past four months, the organizationhas grown from a reach of three people to reaching 2 lakh individuals. The foundersagreed that this is proof that the young India wants to see change and are willing to takeaction to make that change.Ms. Deepa Gupta, a climate activist working in Australia and in India said, “There are somany young people working on this issue, and we won’t be listened to as individuals oras a small group of people, but mass united as the Youth of India, we cannot be ignored.India has about 700 million under the age of 35. How can they not be represented in thedecisions, when they are the ones that will be impacted the most by climate change?”The evening also saw the launch of the Hyderabad Climate Alliance, a youth movementto bring together local efforts of individuals, organizations and institutions with theaim of mitigating climate change and helping the people of Hyderabad and AndhraPradesh adapt to its impacts. The launch included all 50 delegates from Hyderabad andAP signing on to the Hyderabad Climate Alliance Pledge, agreeing that they “understandthat climate change is an impending global catastrophe… and believe that Hyderabadand Andhra Pradesh will be particularly susceptible… and commit to contribute in earnestto mitigating climate change and helping the people and natural environment ofHyderabad to adapt.”Mr. Rabindra Biswas, co-founder of the Hyderabad Climate Alliance, introduced the ideaof the Alliance and explained about its purpose as a network for those interested inclimate issues in the city, its intended objectives, ways of working and expectationsfrom the Alliance to the participants. He elicited support and future participation fromthe delegates present, particularly delegates from Hyderabad and the region, and spokeabout different activities which the Alliance could undertake together with everyoneinvolved. Ms. Amala Akkinani, film star and founder of the Blue Cross of Hyderabad,14
  • 15. spoke about the different actions necessary for the people of Hyderabad to commit toin order to address climate change. She emphasized the need for lifestyle changes andhow that would translate to changes on a larger city-wide level as well. She said, “I maynot be a climate expert, but I am a concerned citizen. I love my planet; it is my onlyhome.” Akkinani had participated in The Climate Project: India’s training program withAl Gore in February, and is very active with the Blue Cross to work for the welfare ofanimals in Hyderabad.DAY 2:DAYThe morning session began by a presentation by Mr. Bittu Sehgal, founder of SanctuaryMagazine, renowned author, and environmentalist, spoke about the importance of theSummit and the IYCN in India. “Young people have power,” he said, “and it is time to useit to your advantage.” One of his major messages was that we all need to take action inour own lives, actions small and large, to make a difference. He said, “If a lot do a little,a lot gets done.”He also discussed climate equity, the sense that those who are most responsible for theemissions leading to climate change are not the ones who will be feeling the most of theimpacts of the changes. He said that climate equity is not only true between nations butwithin the nation itself. However, he encouraged that we get past the debate on climateequity to the discussion of unified action. He said,“If your house is on fire, you can’t go downstairs “Genetic diversity in our food crops,”and have a debate on who started the fire and “means that we will be protectedwho is responsible to put it out. You need to get from a single climatic disaster.”some water and put it out.” While the West maynot be taking action fast enough to mitigate climate Ms. Farida Tampalimpacts, this is not a reason for India to behesitating on climate action as well.Next, Ms. Farida Tampal, State Director of WWF-India in Andhra Pradesh, spoke aboutthe impacts on biodiversity from climate changes. In particular, she described theimportance of protecting biodiversity in order to protect ourselves from climatic changes.“Genetic diversity in our food crops,” she said, “means that we will be protected from asingle climatic disaster.” While individual crops might succumb to an extreme drought orflood, certain species would have greater capacity to survive one or the other, reducingthe threat of a massive food crisis. She encouraged the youth to question the 15
  • 16. city’s tendency to cut down old grown trees in Hyderabad in order to expand the roads.Ms. Alexis Ringwald, former Fulbright Scholar from the United States, spoke about thekey energy trends in India, and the need for a renewable energy strategy to guaranteethe energy security of India. She emphasized that IT solutions can help solve climatechange, by measuring energy consumption and allowing individuals, cities and companiesto better manage and reduce their energy usage.Mr. Vikram Aditya, programme coordinator, Friendship Foundation and co-founder ofHyderabad Climate Alliance, presented on the sensitivity of ecosystems to climaticchanges, and shed light on the role of ecosystem based feedback effects on increasingemissions and how micro climatic shifts caused by global warming could impact ecologicalintegrity. He also spoke about how each type of ecosystem, such as tropical forests,high altitude ecosystem, coastal and island ecosystems and marine ecosystems wouldrespond to rising temperatures, with the example of ecosystems from India.Mr. Kartikeya Singh, executive director, IYCN, spoke about the Climate Solutions RoadTour that the Indian Youth Climate Network was planning on battery powered solarcharged Reva cars from Kanyakumari to New Delhi, crossing several Indian cities andstates along the way. The Road Tour hoped to disseminate the youth charter and nationalaction plan that were produced at the summit, and also highlight positive climatesolutions in each city, while spreading awareness on climate change.Presentations throughout the day were from youth across India and the world, includingpresentations on biodiversity challenges in Rajasthan, urban transport solutions in Indianmetros, energy production from waste projects in Coimbatore, and climate change’simpact on the food crisis. The rest of the day was spent in discussions on specific issues related to climate impacts,adaptation and mitigation of climate change. Youth gathered in heated debates to createa vision for their future and a strategy to reach that vision. In particular, today’s discussionsincluded energy efficiency and renewable energy as paths towards mitigation; the impactsof climate change on biodiversity and water resources; and adaptation to climate changein the agricultural sector.The youth talked about committing to an international target for emissions, includingan absolute emissions reduction target for India. While there is a lot of debate aroundthe world and within India on whether there should be a target for emissions reductions,but nobody is discussing what those targets should be. Hence participants felt the16
  • 17. preparing to work against climate change Relaxing during a tea break 17
  • 18. Working on solutions during a working group session Some intense deliberations18
  • 19. responsibility to spark a national debate on what targets India needs to commit to.Participants agreed that India needs to commit to emissions reduction targets andrenewable energy targets, and that needs to be based on a 350ppm target of carbondioxide emissions in the atmosphere. The reason for this being, an IPCC estimate, a450ppm scenario gives us a 50% chance of limiting global warming to 2 degrees Celsius.50% chance isn’t good enough. You wouldn’t board on a plane if you knew it had a 50%chance of crashing. Similarly we need to have a carbon dioxide concentration target thatis far more secure, which is 350ppm in the atmosphere. James Hansen, climate scientistfrom NASA in the United States has agreed that 350 is the highest target that will allow usfor a stable climate – a climate in which we will still have glaciers in the Himalayas and stillhave coastal cities like Kolkata and Dhaka.Joint Sitting of Youth: In the last session of the first day of the summit, a plenary stylejoint sitting of youth was organized where young delegates were invited to presentabout their experiences with climate change and their ideas for mitigation. Presentationsranged from medical treatment of livestock to arrest methane production in the digestivesystem, in order to prevent methane emissions from the agricultural sector, to the efficacyof CDM and market based mechanisms as a mitigation tool, and their impacts oncommunities and their livelihoods.DAY 3:The day began by Mr. Gaurav Gupta of The Climate Project – India, which called for theyouth to evaluate some of the hardest moral issues with regards to who should bebearing the costs of climate change adaptation and mitigation in countries like India.While India is suffering the largest impacts of climate change and is one of the world’slargest emitters, it has one of the lowest per capita levels of greenhouse gas emissionsand must be allowed to develop to a higher level of per capita emissions, as developednations must decrease their per capita and cumulative emissions drastically. He also saidthat just as industrialized nations should be taxed based on their carbon emissions today,they should also be taxed for historical emissions, as the wealth of Europe and the UnitedStates is built on years of carbon emissions for which they were not charged.The morning’s presentations also included presentations by Ms. Tapati Ghosh of Centerfor Social Markets and Mr. Brikesh Singh from Greenpeace India. Ms. Ghosh spoke aboutCSM’s projects to raise awareness about climate change, including the City Dialogueson Climate Change and Climate Challenge India, which received an award at the United 19
  • 20. Nations Climate Conference in Bali in 2007 as one of the world’s top five climate programs.Ms. Ghosh said, “Climate Challenge India seeks to build a new climate of hope andopportunity on climate change.”Ms. Natasha Chandy of Greenpeace India, spoke about Greenpeace’s initiatives forgrassroots action on climate change. She discussed Greenpeace’s experience in fightingagainst climate change, particularly as a watchdog and activist organization practicingnon violent direct action. She said, “If we need to fight climate change, we – tomorrow’sfuture – need to create a revolution today. IYSoCC is just the beginning.”Mr. Anugraha John, spoke about his experiences in advocating water issues andarticulating them with climate change. He said that to deal with climate change and waterissues it is our attitude and behaviour that has to change first. An integrated approachfor water resource management is very vital. Mr. Digu Arachamy later spoke about climatechange and impacts on agriculture. He also described the possible agriculture impacts inthe future, particularly in southern India and the need for the agricultural sector to takeadaptive measures in anticipation which would help the sector survive the impacts ofclimate change. Mr. Narayan Murthy, co-founder, non-executive“We have a population of 650 to 700 Chairman and Chief Mentor of Infosysmillion people under the age of 30. Technologies Limited, spoke to the IndianIf we can mobilize this force, we will Youth Summit on Climate Change delegateshave enormous power for change in the afternoon about climate change and theto address climate change.” power of youth to make a change. He Narayana Murthy encouraged all of the delegates to lead through their own examples, to walk the talkwith regards to conservation of resources. “I have always believed that the most powerfulinstrument that a leader has is leadership by example.” He was very supportive of themotives and actions of the Indian Youth Climate Network, and said, “We have a populationof 650 to 700 million people under the age of 30. If we can mobilize this force, we willhave enormous power for change to address climate change.”In the next session, a youth exchange was organized, where youth from around the countrydiscussed impacts of climate change in their own states, ranging from loss of glaciersand decreased tourism due to decreased snowfall in Himachal Pradesh, reduction infruit production in Kashmir, to droughts and farmer suicides in Andhra Pradesh and20
  • 21. Tamil Nadu. They also spoke about their solutions for their regions, including statewidesupport for subsidies on renewables, mandatory solar water heating and rainwaterharvesting, and better educational campaigns on climate solutions. The most excitingpart, of course, was the commitment made by individuals and by groups to take actionwhen they do return home – to turn the words of the week into actions. The team fromDelhi each committed to speak at five schools or colleges to spread the message, and tomeet in two weeks to discuss how to move the Delhi Charter on Climate Change intoaction. Representatives from Bangalore agreed to compile a database of all organizationsworking on climate and environment in Karnataka and have a meeting on August 23 tounite them. In Hyderabad, groups committed to tree plantations. Many agreed to passalong information regarding Project 350, an international grassroots movement to raisethe number of 350 ppm as the international target for emissions. This has been identifiedas the only safe level of carbon emissions that will allow for a stable future climate, andis the base of international actions leading up to an international agreement for climatepolicy in Copenhagen at the United Nations climate negotiations in 2009.In the afternoon, a group of international youth organizers spoke about their experiencesinternationally. Ms. Deepa Gupta told of direct actions that were organized in Australia,including chaining activists to trees to prevent being cut down and the Youth ClimateAction Camp which included hundreds of youth lying on railway tracks to prevent coaltrains from reaching a new coal plant. Two students from Nepal spoke about the impactsof climate change in Nepal and the international youth movement’s actions there.Representatives from the United States spoke about the shift from fear-based to hope-based climate action and the campus based movements that spread across the country,including Nathan Wyeth from Sierra Student Coalition and Will Bates from Project 350.In particular, Mr. Bates highlighted the effectiveness of national days of actions, includingStep it Up 2007, in which 1400 communities and campuses across the country in all 50states held events to call for 80 percent reductions in carbon emissions by 2050.Global Citizens’ Climate Change and Water Film Festival engaged the participants inunderstanding the present scenario in visual medium and encouraged dialogue afterthe screening in order to generate awareness amongst delegates on the multifacetedimpacts of climate change and its interrelationships with water issues.The day ended with a painting session, with delegates painting canvases depicting theirthoughts on climate change, impacts and solution. This was part of the Oxfam Indiacampaign which will be bringing to this year’s international climate negotiations. 21
  • 22. Mr. Manu Sharma gave a presentation on how serious the issue of Climate Change wasand challenged the role of Indian Youth Climate Network through constructive criticism.D AY 4The final day was more of a consolidation of all the heated debates and discussions ineach of the working groups.The following outcomes resulted in each working groups:I. AgricultureAgriculture: Challenges:The challenges facing agriculture are water availability, soil fertility, food security andsovereignty. Land use change (urbanization and SEZs) and limited land availability andvariability in the patterns of precipitation and most importantly intensive farming areother crucial issues.Agriculture: Impacts: 1. Reduction in yield in tropical areas and a slight increase in the temperate areas. 2. Increased incidence of pest attacks and animal diseases. 3. Rapid loss of nutrients from the soil due to increased temperature which in turn causes more usage of fertilizers aggravating the climate crisis. 4. Economic insecurity for the farming community (migration of more people into the cities:- more stress on the urban communities) 5. Reduced water availability for crops in turn affecting yield. 6. Loss of pasture lands.Adaptive Measures: 1. Adapting to challenges of climate change will involve incorporating farming practices like co-op farming, organic farming and precision farming. 2. Agriculture should be given an industrial status and farmers the right to fix the prices for their produce. 3. Integrated watershed development to deal with stress on water resources.22
  • 23. 4. Early warning systems using GIS and remote sensing 5. Diversification of food crops to ensure food security. 6. Reducing post harvest losses by improving management practices in storage and distribution. 7. Weather based crop insurance schemes to protect farmers from climate variability. 8. Incentivized crop rotation and mixed cropping. 9. Marketing of organic produce. 10. Imposing taxes on water and electricity used in farming based on economic status and regional disparities to prevent its misuse. 11. Value addition to indigenous variety of crops. Eg:- MilletsYouth Initiative/Action: 1. Increased funding for R&D in agriculture which will motivate youth to take up agricultural research. 2. Young people can bridge the gaps between technology and the farming community. 3. Documenting success stories in agricultural practices and promoting it through the media. 4. Promoting consumption of locally grown food. 5. Taking up social auditing of schemes like NREGA, PDS etc. 6. Enforcing localized/regionalized solutions to climate change in the field of agriculture.II. BiodiversityDirect Impacts of Climate Change: 1. Macro and micro climatic changes affecting the flora and fauna 2. Disappearance of highly sensitive species like amphibians 3. Increase in the population of invasive species like mosquitoes which will have direct consequences on health of people. 23
  • 24. 4. Shifting of species to higher altitudes following the isotherm. 5. Desertification leading to species loss. 6. Melting of the icecaps in the polar regions - causing biodiversity loss. 7. Migration of species to higher latitudes.Indirect Impacts/Human Induced: 1. Change in land use pattern leading to habitat loss and destruction. 2. Use of pesticides affecting species and genetic diversity. 3. Mining activities and industrial pollution.Challenges: 1. Lack of scientific data and evidences of loss of the existing biodiversity 2. Improper bio diversity assessment techniques. 3. Finding a balance between development and biodiversity conservation. 4. Not recognizing traditional knowledge in conservation practices. 5. Neglecting biodiversity aspect in development projects. 6. Lack of perception of biodiversity among common people.Youth Actions/Solutions: 1. Promoting biodiversity education at every level ( From schools to Universities) 2. Taking initiatives towards local solutions. 3. Setting up a Helpline/Rapid action Biodiversity force (RABF). 4. Lead by example, plant trees on a regular basis and take care of them.Youth Influence: 1. Better youth representation at policy levels. 2. Biodiversity conservation at local levels. 3. Learning and documenting traditional knowledge24
  • 25. On the road to 350Discussing climate solutions 25
  • 26. Climate artwork Getting creative for the climate26
  • 27. 4. Realizing the full potential of existing national biodiversityGovernmental Actions: 1. Giving economic value to biodiversity which helps in its preservation 2. Substantiating available information on impacts to influence government action 3. Climate and biodiversity curriculum in mainstream education 4. Reorienting formal education to incorporate adaptation in the area of biodiversity conservation 5. Implementing technological solutions like GIS and remote sensing to preserve and protect forest 6. Promoting vertical expansion of cities which will decrease the stress on forest lands 7. Decentralized approach to Natural Resource management 8. Government should invest more funds towards R & D in conservation of Natural resourcesIII. CommunitiesWG (Settlement, society, communities)Impacts: - Floods in low lying areas due to sea level rise - Resource based conflicts as a result of climate change - Livelihood and social insecurity of fishermen communities - Inability to protect livestock during floods - Absence of functional sewage and waste management infrastructure - Displacement of communities due to large scale development projects, which is further compounded by climate change impacts - Torrential rains causing landslides in hilly areas - Recognition of land rights 27
  • 28. - Urbanization, caused by unregulated migration because of climate change, is further aggravating space crunch - Increased incidences of natural disasters - Climate refugees, also lead to human trafficking - Impact on health care, food security and education infrastructureAdaptation: - Spreading awareness through rapid responses specially in cases of disasters through internet, TV, mobiles, both about forecasting disasters and also about potential adaptation measures - Communication in different regional languages on disaster planning and adaptation - Financing education programmes on disaster management and adaptation, and having more such courses in formal education curricula - Enabling continuity of occupation for displaced communities - Micro financing through self help groups for adaptation planning - Establish disaster management committees for designing community specific adaptation plans with community participation - Creating employment for vulnerable communities in emerging sectors like renewable power - Establishing emergency response infrastructure all over India, in rural as well as urban areas - Making primary and high end health care services, both for consultation and for treatment accessible - Improved connectivity between rural and urban areas - Conservation of natural resources through rainwater harvesting, and waste and sewage management, in both rural and urban areas - Accessibility to public food distribution systems28
  • 29. - Preventing human inhabitation in areas which are vulnerable to disasters, and incorporating similar measures in urban planning - Encourage youth involvement in comprehensive adaptation planning - Prioritize marginalized communities, particularly women, when planning adaptation responsesIV. EnergyIV. “If we need to fight climate change,Technologies and Legal Policies we – tomorrow’s future – need to create a revolution today. IYSoCC isNo new coal just the beginning.” - No new thermal power plant without Natasha Chandy of carbon capturing system Greenpeace India - Coke used in steel plants as an energy source; but the extra heat from the furnace can be channelized for power generation - Major subsidies for renewable energy sources and increasing price of non- renewable energies - Extension of subsidy time - Recycling; such as scrap steel used as raw material - Privatisation of electricity distribution and production systems (eg. Reliance) - Renewable energy privatisation - Subsidy for solar R&DPhasing out Incandescent bulbs by 2012 - Double the taxes for IBs; cross subsiding CFLs and LEDs - Encourage manufacture of energy saving technologiesAll street lighting to be solar powered by 2011 - Housing welfare associations can be promoted to change the street lightings to be solar powered and added to their maintenance charge 29
  • 30. - Banning light hoardings30% energy within commercial and cooperative buildings to come from renewable sources - Enact legislation - Power rationing - Cap the power per capita dist system depending on the occupancy/size of the building - Ridding double taxation for companies using renewable energy sourcesRural homes (90%) not covered in the electrification scheme should be provided withdecentralised renewable energy systems by 2012 to meet the 11th plan objective - More funds to micro finance NGOs to facilitate the above - Decentralising the manufacturing and maintenance supply chain - Addressing power for irrigation needsGDP % to be assigned for R&D for indigenous renewable technologiesV. HEALTH HEALTHImpacts: 1. Malaria outbreak will rise with a temperature increase of 0.1C to 0.2C. Range increase + increase in cases 2. Increase in heat strokes 3. Increase in vector transmitted diseases 4. Today, 48% children (India) are malnourished— this will result in an enervated work force. 5. Increase in old peoples’ vulnerabilities 6. Women a. Increase in malnutrition b. Water shortage- increasing population and existent water stress in slums 7. More pressure on current health care system 8. Increase in disease outbreaks, epidemics30
  • 31. 9. Combined effects of CFCs and GHGs causes increase in skin disorders 10. Respiratory illness on the rise 11. Climate refugees + health care 12. Increased acidity in fresh water resources 13. Loss of production work hours 14. Education of children affectedAdaptation: 1. Disaster education and plans to be localized 2. Storage of food grains, not impacted by natural disasters 3. Proper water treatment (vector control) 4. Enhance access to sanitation in urban slums and rural areas 5. Cultivation of crops to address malnutrition 6. Emergency first aid kits/response systems (primary) at village levels (including doctor availability) 7. Waste treatment at point sources (vector control) 8. Incentive based sanitation facilities for electricity generation 9. Preventive vaccinations 10. Health camps and surveys to assess diseases in communities (region specific sensitivity to disease type) 11. Minimize synthetic chemical use locally to prevent leeching into the local environment during natural disasters (sustainable agriculture will check rural- urban migration) a. Encourage bio-fertilizers b. Organic seeds 12. Adapting diets to changing productivity and availability of food stuff 13. Air filters for public transport 14. Public-private partnerships to bring health professionals to rural areas 15. Local governance over-seeing organized waste disposal in villages 31
  • 32. 16. Disaster warnings not accessed by coastal villages to be conveyed through effective media usage 17. Water management plan in urban areas 18. Water shed management development by consensus of residents in each village 19. Incorporation/engagement of pharmaceutical industry and international organizations to address medical supply shortages driven by climate refugees 20. Management and treatment of bio medical wastes 21. Channelize CSR funds directly to adapt to climate change 22. Rain water harvesting—going back to traditional basics in rural areas, making it mandatory for new constructions in urban areas 23. Urban planning to be revisited- ventilation, waste disposal, etc. INDUSTRYVI. INDUSTRYEstablish the Ministry of Climate Change: - CO2 Regulatory Authority - To check environmental and carbon footprinting of each industry - Have a tribunal (jurisdiction) - Set standards for emissions and other environmental parameters - A strong independent policing and regulatory body such as the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India in the Dept. of Telecom, like a Climate Commission - Penalising/ incentives to companies staying within the mandatory set standards - Triple bottom line to be required - Ministry, in collaboration with the Ministry of HRD, to set standards for educational and vocational training for green entrepreneurs; including modules on green buildings in architecture and engineering courses; holistic climate change degrees at the masters level.CO2 credit trading: - Need for clarity/ simplifying the process and understanding of CDM - Transparent criteria for identifying a CDM project— make sure there’s no double32
  • 33. accounting. Heavy penalty for double accounting. - Stronger certifying bodies to maintain and strengthen the voluntary carbon market. - Through voluntary carbon offsets, grassroot projects should be financed and sustained (through the profits that follow from that investment) - Ensure international structure to support Indian industries to reduce emissionsGreen jobs: - Energy auditors “Young people have power”, “and - Solar panel manufacturers it is time to use it to your - Engineers for renewable energies and advantage.” technologies “If a lot do a little, a lot gets done.” - Micro finance projects within the SMEs: green entrepreneurs “If your house is on fire, you can’t go downstairs and have a debate - Decentralised for rural areas on who started the fire and who is ● Entrepreneurs responsible to put it out. You need ● Manufacturers to get some water and put it out.” ● Maintenance Bittu Sehgal ● Other servicing jobs (recycling batteries etc)Tools to green existing jobs: - Encourage virtualisation communication in IT - Engage media in highlighting oppurtunities/ environmental issues - Encourage R&D (mark of a % of the GDP)Transportation: - Within 5 years no car in cities like Delhi (2012-2015), phasing out all private vehicles, develop public vehicles and substantial taxies - Impose high tax on private cars - To take efforts so that buses can move easily (widening of roads) linking bus 33
  • 34. stops to railway stations - Introduce metros (support such projects) - Public transport to be more safe for passengers - Impose taxes for having more than 1 car (encourage 1 car per family) - Capacity of the roads has to be improved to hold more vehicles; parking should be highly taxed - Increasing research to have non-pollution, sulphur free fuels - Encourage car pooling - Attaching electric motor to the car tyres so that the conversion of cars can be done quickly - Roads should be made from good concrete material, so that they don’t get damaged easily. - Promote Bicycling in integrated transport systems (e-card system to pick up and drop off public shared cycles from mass transit stops). - Integrating residential quarters to offices to encourage people to live close to places of work. - Dedicating separate lanes for bicycles—must be strictly implemented - Increase minimum miles per gallon/liter standard for auto industry to boost fuel efficiency - Increasing interest rates for car loans to discourage purchase of private vehicles. It can be done progressively to discourage large car purchases. - Instead of fines ask the accused to do some public service for some time. - Better follow up of bills (the Pollution Acts) - Traffic police should have database of fines (“challans”) - Education and awareness programs on traffic guidelines and public transport useBuildings - Prevent encroachment of wetlands, lakes and other green spaces - Urban farming, hydroponics, roof-top gardens, promote local goods and local34
  • 35. foods to minimize carbon footprint - Community power back up from renewable energy (and community based renewable energy generation capacity at large)Individual buildings - Energy Conservation Building Codes mandatory for large & small buildings - A building should be able to generate 10-20% of its energy needs from renewable energy - Involve Resident Welfare Associations (RWAs) in this dialog - Communal investment in green technologies and other sustainable practices - Build up (tall) rather than out (reducing space required for office buildings and IT Parks) - Education program on green buildings - Rainwater harvesting must be mandatory before giving license to build - Tax breaks for active communities - Solar water heaters must become mandatory before giving license to build - Incentives for waste recycling within colonies (zero-waste colonies should be encouraged) - Support green design for low-income housing (perhaps begin with solar water heater or rain water harvesting) - Allow greater time for implementation of all green housing codes for low income housing - Effective enforcement of codes on required green space on plotsPower - Street lighting efficiency standards must be set and enforced - Mandate for solar street lights (and efficiency lighting and other measures)Roads - Use of recycled plastic, longer lasting sustainable materials (including permeable 35
  • 36. surfaces) in the making of roads - Uniform urban regulation and proper feasibility studies needed before beginning construction of roadsYouth Action - Collaborating with municipal corporation. Encourage plantation drives in schools and in residential colonies. - Engage in projects to prevent excessive wastage in malls - Education: give projects to students in higher education pertaining to green building concepts - Popularize the findings of such summits and publish them WAVII WATER1. Ocean AcidificationIncrease of carbon dioxide in the ocean acidifies the water. This contributes to coralbleaching. Fisheries, aquatic organisms and algae are directly impacted by the increasein the acidic value of the water. Destruction of the coral reefs impact fishermen and theirlivelihood directly in addition to the loss of biodiversity and the coral reefs. Coral reefsare also the first line of defense against severe tidal waves or cyclones.Action:Coral reef restoration programs should be carried out through artificial means.2. Cyclones and FloodsBecause of climate change, we are seeing an increased intensity and frequency of cyclonesand floods. The coastal areas are specially vulnerable. El Nino and La Nina can also causedestruction of infrastructure and other losses.Possible Solutions: - Installation of early warning and monitoring systems in vulnerable areas - Capacity building for risk management - Cyclone shelters reduce the speed of tidal waves36
  • 37. - Casuarina sp. help to reduce the severity of floods - Implementation of laws with respect to settlements around the coastal areas within specified limitsActions: - Construction of stone embankments - Relocations of threatened buildings - Make vulnerability maps - Resettlement maps - Retrofitting of vulnerable structures3. Glacial MeltingGlacial melting poses immediate threat to infrastructure in the mountain regions throughGLOFs, flashfloods and so on. Human settlements are in danger of avalanches, floodsand increased water stress.Possible Solutions: - Creation of water storage facilities to regulate the stream flow - Adaptable micro hydro facilities that can withstand the variability of river flow that comes with climate change induced glacial melting - Afforestation programs to protect the glaciers from the heat coming from the plains that help to accelerate meltingAction:Recognizing and implementing indigenous adaptation strategies to changing glacial meltingand increasing awareness of the impact on the livelihoods of the mountain people andhow they can adapt their lifestyles to changing conditions4. Salt Water IntrusionIncreasing sea level causes salt water intrusion. This increase in salinity of the riversharming the ecosystem. Because of excessive water pumping, seawater can be drawninland causing contamination of ground water table making water unfit for domesticpurposes. 37
  • 38. Possible Solution:Stop pumping the ground water near coastal areas. This will help to reduce the flow ofseawater inwards.Action:Protection and regeneration of mangrove forests5. Rainfall PatternIrregular rainfall pattern, such as drought in one place with heavy rainfall some distancesaway, is a direct consequence of climate change. Agricultural productivity is severelyimpacted by such irregularities. As most of the rural Indians are farmers, the impact ofirregular rainfall is severe.Possible Solution:For droughts we need to construct and maintain reservoirs. Floods can be controlled bycheck dams.Drought resistant crops:Better watershed management to maximize efficient water use. This may also be in theform of inter linking rivers, drip irrigation techniques, change of farm practices, precisionfarming and so on can be carried out.Actions: - Roof top harvesting to be made compulsory. - Ground water recharge. - To monitor and lobby with the government for the existing laws to be implemented. - Offer subsidies and incentives to get people to use rainwater harvesting - Implementation of green building codes so that rainwater harvesting becomes an essential component of modern building design.6. PollutionThough water pollution may not be directly linked to climate change, we still recognize38
  • 39. the need to abate pollution of water resources. Protection of water is crucial in maintaininga healthy ecosystem.Possible Solution:Waste water treatment plants in urban and industrial complexes should be mademandatory at least for industrial users.Actions: - Advocacy campaigns through letters to companies pressing for waste water treatment - Addressing and engaging the Pollution Control Board. - Using Public Interest Litigation (PIL) and Right to Information (RTI) as tools to investigate and combat water pollution issues. “I may not be a climate expert, - Water metering, taxation and other demand but I am a concerned citizen. I management strategies need to be love my planet; it is my only implemented so that more efficient use of home.” water is done Amala Akkinani - Water credits can be implemented for certain industrial sectors (similar to carbon credits) - Based on water audits annually have Green Corporations Award / Green Building Award.7. Acid RainBecause of emissions from industries and transportation, atmospheric levels of NOx andSOx increase thereby causing the precipitation to be acidic. This harms ecosystems,buildings and structures.Possible Solutions: - Use of renewable energy sources for transportation - Flue gas desulphurization, high temperature selective catalytic reduction, regenerative capture of gases from flue gas 39
  • 40. Actions - Plantations of trees that absorb the gases that lead to acid rain - Put hard caps on industrial emissions similar to SOx - PILs against companies that heavily polluteWater is an important source of life. And its adaptation that is more of concern withregard to water. The youth strongly felt the need to see REVALUE as one of the principlesin addition to the 3Rs: Reduce, Reuse and Recycle. - Subsidies and technology help need to be provided to encourage and enforce installation of waste water treatment facilities by all large industrial complexes - Conservation and regeneration of existing mangrove forests and coral reefs to protect coastal areas and the people directly depending on them for their livelihoods - Integrated water resource management to promote efficient water usage and conservation making use of strategies like water metering, taxing, credits, and auditing.Valedictory and ConclusionMr. Rajamani, former Chief Secretary of the Ministry of Enivronment and Forests,Government of India, was the chief guest of the valedictory session of the Indian YouthSummit on Climate Change. Mr. Rajamani delivered the valedictory address to the gathering. He spoke about the importance of what “In your own group wherever youth can achieve as a result of living sustainably you live, make the change” and leading an example that others could voluntarily emulate. He also spoke about his “I think you’re on the ball, on experiences in the environment department that the move, all the best” he had the pleasure of heading, and his role in Dr Rajamani managing and conserving India’s natural resources. He encouraged all the participants to createchange that they desired by being the change themselves.At the end of the programme each participants were given certificates. This was a symbolicexpression of having successfully trained to be Climate Leaders.40
  • 41. The organizers : (clockwise) Rabindranath Biswas, Raji Nair, Digu Arachamy, KartikeyaSingh, Caroline Howe, Rohan Parikh, Govind Singh, Vikram Aditya, Anugraha John and Deepa Gupta Discussing state specific climate issues during a joint sitting of youth 41
  • 42. Participants in a human art formation of 350 Participants during a pleasant Hyderabad evening42
  • 43. Mr. Murthy joins hands with young Indians on climate change A post session informal discussion during lunch 43
  • 44. Priya, from Oxfam India presents on Oxfams campaign on climate change in India Young citizens without borders working against climate change44
  • 45. Appendix 1 Summit Programme Schedule:Session Programme7th August 20084.00 – 4.30 pm Registration4.30 – 6.00 pm Inaugural followed by tea Anchoring : Charu Shah Welcome address : Vikram Aditya (10 min) Recorded Speech : Dr. R K Pachauri (15 min) Recorded Speech : Dr. Vandana Shiva (15 min) Recorded Speech : Dr. Sunita Narain (15 min) Recorded Chief Guest Speech : Mr. Nitin Desai (10 min) Opening declaration of IYSoCC by IYSoCC team Welcome song : Students of Bharatiya Vidya Bhavans (5 min)6.00 – 6.30 pm Introducing the IYCN and discussion : Kartikeya Singh6.30 – 8.00 pm Launch of Hyderabad Climate Alliance (Side event for Hyderabad participants) Opening remarks : Rabindranath Biswas (15 min) Climate change documentary from Hyderabad (15 min ) Presentation by Mr. Jayesh Ranjan (10 min) Group session on objectives, expectations and vision of HCA (20 min) Reporting back – all groups (20 min) Concluding remarks – Vikram Aditya (10 min)8th August 20088.30 – 9.30 am Breakfast9.30 – 11.00 am Plenary: Moderated by Kartikeya Singh Mr. Bittu Sehgal – Impacts of climate change on biodiversity (15 min) Ms. Farida Tampal – Biodiversity and climate change (15 min ) Vikram Aditya – Sensitivity of ecosystems to climate change and the tipping point (15 min) 45
  • 46. Anugraha John – Water and climate change in India (15 min ) Discussion (30 min) 11.00 – 11.30 am Morning tea 11.30 – 1.00 pm Working Groups (Impacts and challenges, mitigation, policy aspects) WG 1 – Biodiversity : Caroline Howe WG 2 – Biodiversity : Vikram Aditya WG 3 – Energy : Kartikeya Singh 1.00 – 2.00 pm Lunch 2.00 – 3.30 pm Working Groups (Impacts and challenges, adaptation, mitigation) WG 1 – Water : Anugraha John WG 2 – Agriculture : Digu Arachamy WG 3 – Industry : Vikram Aditya 3.30 – 4.00 pm Working groups wind up followed by tea 4.00 – 5.30 pm Joint sitting of youth (youth presentations): Reporting back from working groups (30 min) Youth presentations (45 min) Discussion (15 min) 6.00 – 7.00 pm Global Citizens’ Climate Change and Water Film Festival 9th August 2008 8.30 – 9.30 am Breakfast 9.30 – 11.00 am Plenary - Moderated by Anugraha John The Climate Project India (15 min ) Center for Social Markets (15 min) Greenpeace Campaign on Climate Change (15 min) Kartikeya Singh – Energy sector and climate change (15 min) Digu Arachamy – Climate change and agriculture (15 min) Discussion (30 min) 11.00 – 11.30 am Morning tea46
  • 47. 11.30 – 1.00 pm Youth exchange on climate change impacts and mitigation ideas from different states This is an open session, where youth may discuss things that are important to their regions or their communities – either in group work according to states/regions or as a facilitated whole group discussion1.00 – 2.00 pm Lunch2.00 – 3.30 pm Working Groups (Impacts and challenges, adaptation, mitigation) WG 1 – Agriculture : Digu Arachamy WG 2 – Water : Anugraha John WG 3 – Agriculture and forestry : Vikram Aditya3.30 – 4.00 pm Working groups report back followed by tea4.00 – 5.00 pm International Youth Climate Change Panel - Moderated by Deepa Gupta5.00 – 8.00 pm Presentation by Ms. Priya Pillai on Oxfam Campaign on Climate Change followed by Global Citizens’ Climate Change and Water Film Festival10th August 20088.30 – 9.30 am Breakfast9.30 – 11.00 am Working Groups (Impacts and challenges, adaptation, mitigation) WG 1 – Human health : Kartikeya Singh WG 2 – Human health : Vikram Aditya WG 3 – Transport and building : Caroline Howe11.00 – 11.30 am Morning tea11.30 – 1.00 pm Working Groups conclude their work and submit their recommendations WG 1 – Industry, settlement and society : Caroline Howe WG 2 – Communities and society : Vikram Aditya WG 3 – Waste : Kartikeya Singh 47
  • 48. 1.00 – 2.00 pm Lunch 2.00 – 3.30 pm Plenary (Draft Indian youth charter on climate change, and youth vision for the post 2012 regime is presented and discussed) - Moderated by Deepa Gupta 3.30 – 4.00 pm Evening tea 4.00 – 5.00 pm Final plenary (revised draft of charter and youth vision presented and voted upon by youth) Moderated by Vikram Aditya 5.00 – 6.00 pm Valedictory (final charter and youth vision is declared, followed by closing) Anchoring : Charu Shah Special dignitary : Mr. Rajamani, Former Chief Secretary, MoEF (15 min) Speech : Satyam representative (10 min) Speech : Infosys representative (10 min) Vote of Thanks : Rabindranath Biswas – 5 min Release of youth charter, youth protocol and youth plan of action (read out) – 15 min48
  • 49. Organization Profile1. Global Citizens for Sustainable Development:Global Citizens for Sustainable Development (GCSD) is registered not-for-profit andnon-governmental-organization with its registered office in Bangalore, India. The missionof GCSD is to engage and empower children, youth, men and women to sustaincommunities, cultures and societies while promoting improvement in their social,economic and environmental conditions through the notion of human responsibilities.GCSD is a platform for children, youth, men and women motivated to bring a positivechange at a personal, social and ecological level in their individual environment andtheir respective society for the progress of humanity. GCSD currently works on issuesrelated to Cross-Cultural Dialogue and Inter-religious dialogue for Peace, Health - HIV/AIDS, Education, Children and Environment issues especially Climate Change and Water.Most of the grassroot level work is Bangalore based in slum communities, rural andsemi-urban areas. We work nationally and internationally with other partners.GCSD website links:GCSD: www.globalcitizens.org.inWorld Youth Water Alliance - www.wateralliance.orgChina-India Forum: www.chinaindiaforum.org.inJapan-India Forum: www.japanindiaforum.org.inAsian Citizens Assembly 2010: www.asianassembly2010.org.in2. Nature and Biological Sciences Society:The Nature and Biological Sciences Society is an independent student run organization,founded in the year 2004 by a group of youngsters pursuing scientific streams inHyderabad. Subsequently, these founding students joined hands with students from nonscience streams and built up the organization through various activities.The mission of the NBSS is to make people aware of different streams in the livingsciences, and to promote academic and active interest in studying the life sciences in thethrough conducting various events, workshops, projects and undertaking researchinitiatives. The organization also regularly undertakes health awareness programmes forchildren and students. 49
  • 50. The objectives of the Society are:To generate interest in LIVING SCIENCES among all the age groupsTo highlight the importance of NATURE and its biological importanceTo provide a platform for the students to implement their innovative ideas and to explorethemselvesTo impart knowledge regarding the various measures of conservation, working withwell-reputed organizationsTo take up various upcoming research challengesTo spread awareness among rural and urban population3. Indian Youth Climate Network:The Indian Youth Climate Network (IYCN) was founded in March 2008 by Govind Singh,Kartikeya Singh and Deepa Gupta. Since its inception the network has seen massivegrowth, starting from 3 people and spanning out to thousands of youth and youngprofessionals in India as well as Indians overseas. The mission of the IYCN is to uniteIndian youth to ensure a clean, bright future, to generate awareness and to empower ageneration of young people to take effective action against climate change, at a local,state, national and international level.IYCN works on three levels: 1. As a network of individuals allowing people to come together and interact at a grassroots level, form friendships and support each other 2. As a coalition of member and supporter groups who come under the umbrella group of IYCN, however maintain their autonomy, yet leverage off a national network of young people passionate about the environment and development. 3. As a centralized organization that runs its own programs and projects, accepts sponsorship and donations and forms partnerships and runs media campaigns.IYCN has also initiated and completed many projects in its short span of existence: Thefirst success story being the Delhi Youth Summit on Climate. It has also successfully initiatedmany Campus Climate Challenger groups in schools and colleges (particularly the IITs)around the country and has launched the IYCN Climate Leadership training in Delhi. In50
  • 51. the pipeline are other projects including: 1. The Climate Solutions Road Tour from Chennai to Delhi, 2. Climate Leadership Program in Chennai, Rajasthan and Himachal Pradesh 3. A Rural Energy Project 4. A nation wide Climate Action Bill, 5. The Indian Youth Summit on Climate Change 6. Agents of Change program: which aims to send an Indian Youth Delegation to the UN Climate Conference in Poland. Website: www.iycn.in4. Friendship Foundation:The Friendship Foundation is a youth led, grassroots, registered trust based in Hyderabadworking on environment and sustainable development related issues since 2002. Theorganization was registered in February 2002 in Hyderabad. The Foundation believes infostering greater amity between humans and nature through involving young peopleand children in positive environmental actions.The areas of work include environmental education, sustainable development, pollutioncontrol, youth empowerment and participation in environmental initiatives. Climatechange is a major area of interest of the organization. The Foundation has been involvedin climate change education since the past two years, and has been undertaking publicoutreach programmes and awareness generation campaigns in schools and institutionsfor the past two years, often in partnership with other organizations. The organizationhas also undertaken projects on community forest management and trade justice invillages close to Hyderabad. The Friendship Foundation was involved in an awarenessprogramme for Vana Samrakshana Samithi (VSS) committee members of several villagesin Vikarabad forest range, educating them on the importance of planting native plantspecies over alien species. More recently, the organization also associated with a massiveclean up drive of the Bellal Cheruvu Lake in Bodhan, Nizamabad district, Andhra Pradesh,and provided the necessary technical and manpower support in lake restoration drivewhich was primarily undertaken by school students of Holy Mary High School, Bodhan.The Foundation regularly organizes clean up programmes of wetlands and lakes in andaround Hyderabad, tree plantation programmes, awareness campaigns and presentationsand lectures in schools and colleges of Hyderabad, and is part of various youth and 51
  • 52. environmental networks globally, such as SAYEN.5. Campaigns Galore:Campaigns Galore! Is a communication resource group that specializes in social, andcause related marketing. With a focus to communicate creatively social issues throughinnovative engagement campaigns, the organization aims to connect the cause to theright audience effectively.Some of its projects include: 1. Heart 2 Heart carnival, a fundraising campaign for Save A Child’s Heart (SACH), an initiative of Apollo Hospitals, Hyderabad 2. Eco kids carnival - an entertainment and an informative show for Planet3, 3. Idea 2 Reality - an idea generation environmental campaign for Planet3 4. October Storm: A games village organized for WWF–Bangalore during the Wildlife celebrationsThe organization is currently working on Catch Every Drop, a campaign that aims to workon rainwater harvesting at the grassroots level.Sponsor Profiles:1. Satyam:Satyam is a leading global business and information technology company, deliveringconsulting, systems integration, and outsourcing solutions to clients in over 20 industries.Satyam Computer Services Ltd. was founded by B.Ramalinga Raju in 1987; Satyam means“truth” in Sanskrit. The company offers a variety of information technology (IT) servicesspanning various industry sectors, and is listed on the New York Stock Exchange. Satyam’snetwork spans across 63 countries in 6 continents. In India, in addition to Hyderabad, ithas development centers at Bangalore, Chennai, Pune, Mumbai, Nagpur, Delhi, Kolkata,Bhubaneswar, and Visakhapatnam.Satyam has been ranked consistently in the top Employers list released by surveys doneby leading media groups such as Business India, Economic Times etc.52
  • 53. 2. Infosys:Infosys Technologies Limited, is a technology services company headquartered inBengaluru, India. It is one of India’s largest IT companies with over 94,379 professionals(including subsideries) as of June 30, 2008. It has nine development centers in India andover 30 offices worldwide.Infosys was founded on July 2, 1981 in Pune by N. R. Narayana Murthy and six others:Nandan Nilekani, N. S. Raghavan, Kris Gopalakrishnan, S. D. Shibulal, K. Dinesh andAshok Arora.Infosys is also heavily involved in social responsibility, and has created the InfosysFoundation in the state of Karnataka, operating in the areas of health care, socialrehabilitation and rural uplift, education, arts and culture. Since then, the InfosysFoundation has spread to other states including Tamil Nadu, Andhra Prdesh, Maharashtra,Orissa and Punjab.3. Tetra Pak:Tetra Pak is a multinational food processing and packaging company of Swedish origin.It was founded in 1951 in Lund, Sweden by Ruben Rausing. It was Erik Wallenberg whoinvented the tetrahedral package, today known as Tetra Classic. The company is part ofthe Tetra Laval group, and is currently headquartered in Switzerland. Tetra Pak’s innovationis in the area of aseptic processing liquid food packaging which, when combined withUltra-high-temperature processing (UHT), allows liquid food to be packaged and storedunder room temperature conditions for up to a year.This allows for perishable goods to be saved and distributed over greater distanceswithout the need for a cool chain.4. Blue Cross of Hyderabad:Blue Cross of Hyderabad is a voluntary organisation that works for the welfare of animalsin Hyderabad, India. Founded in 1992 by film stars Nagarjuna & Amala Akkineni andsupported by like minded animal lovers, Blue Cross has extended help to over 300,000sick, injured and abused animals and birds till date. Blue Cross of Hyderabad presentlyruns a 2 acre animal shelter from where 9 projects for the welfare of animals are conductedall year round.The organization rescues sick and injured animals, prevents cruelty to animals, relieves 53
  • 54. animal suffering through a Veterinary Hospital and Animal Shelter, conducts an adoptionprogramme for homeless animals, ensuring that the animals get to good homes, promotessustainable animal welfare through a Mobile Veterinary Care Unit for working Equinesbelonging to very poor communities in four districts of A.P, educates animal owners,children and citizens groups on animal welfare, interacts with the Government, Mediaand Citizen’s groups to resolve animal related issues in a humane manner, and givespresentations on Animal Welfare, Environmental awareness & Climate Change.5. Oxfam India:A new, Indian Oxfam was established by Oxfam International as India has the developmentexperience and growing economy to solve its own development problems in India aswell as other parts of the world. Oxfam Trust will define and articulate Indian perspectiveson poverty and development. Oxfam India Trust, following the vision of OxfamInternational, works with others in fighting poverty and injustice around the world,through effective, appropriate and enduring solutions.Oxfam Trust was set up to support initiatives in advocacy and provide a platform forgrassroots Indian NGOs to bring the grassroots issues to the national and internationallevel. This would counterbalance the international development scene, which is currentlydominated by Northern NGOs.Oxfam India aims to tackle the root causes of poverty and develop lasting solutions topoverty, hunger, and social injustice.Oxfam India Trust currently supports work in Delhi, Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh andUttaranchal. In the future it will also support projects in Bihar, Chhattisgarh, North Bengal,Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh, Orissa and seven states in North East India.6. LEAD India:LEAD India is registered as an NGO under the Societies Act and has a membership of 146Fellows strategically and geographically located across the length and breadth of thecountry. At present, many Indian LEAD Fellows hold senior positions in Government,Non-Government, Donor agencies, Industry, Media, PSU’s and Academia. Others workat grassroots level with communities and some provide support services, urban andrural, aimed at building capacity for sustainable development. This multi-sectorcomposition places LEAD India in a unique position, not only to deliver quality training,but training that has been validated through a process of cross-sector insights across the54
  • 55. entire spectrum and strata of society.Speaker Profile:Dr. Vandana Shiva:Vandana Shiva is an eminent physicist, environmental activist and author, currently basedin New Delhi. She has authored over 300 papers, published in leading scientific andtechnical journals. Shiva was trained as a physicist and received her Ph.D in physics at theUniversity of Western Ontario in 1978. Subsequently, she pursued interdisciplinaryresearch in science, technology and environmental policy at the Indian Institute of Scienceand the Indian Institute of Management in Bangalore.Shiva has fought for changes in the practice and paradigms of agriculture and food.Intellectual property rights, biodiversity, biotechnology, bioethics and genetic engineeringare among the fields where Shiva has contributed intellectually and through activistcampaigns. She has assisted grassroots organizations of the Green movement in Africa,Asia, Latin America, Ireland, Switzerland and Austria with campaigns against geneticengineering. In 1982, she founded the Research Foundation for Science, Technology andEcology, which led to the creation of Navdanya.Mr. Bittu Sahgal:Bittu Sahgal’s innate affinity for nature, borne of frequent treks and camping trips to theIndian wilderness, has propelled his career in both publishing and on-the-ground activismfor nature conservation. He publishes Cub Magazine, and The Ecologist Asia, plus anenvironmental features syndication service. He is founder and editor of Sanctuary Magazineand has produced over thirty conservation-oriented documentary films seen by millionsof Indians over the national television Network, Doordarshan, in the 1980s.His eloquent outspokenness against destructive development projects, the use of toxicchemicals, government usurpation of natural resources belonging to communities atlarge, and much more, has put him in high profile struggles too numerous to record. Hisability to influence government policy through his enlightened activism is well known.Bittu has in the past held several honorary positions on government and non-governmentcommittees including the Indian Board for Wildlife, Project Tiger, Environment ExpertCommittee, Animal Welfare Board, and the Maharashtra Advisory Board. In 2004, Sahgalreceived the Society for Conservation Biology, Distinguished Service Award (Education 55
  • 56. and Journalism). He also founded the highly successful Kids for Tigers, an all-India initiativein which kids lobby to save the Bengal tiger.Ms. Farida Tampal:Ms. Farida Tampal is the State Director of WF-India Andhra Pradesh State Office (APSO).She is also the Coordinator of WWF-India’s Education Programme Coordination Group(EPCG). She is also in charge of WWF-India’s Young Climate Savers programme, thecountry’s first student level education programme on Climate Change and EnergyEducation in Schools in 10 cities in India called Young Climate Savers programme.Ms Tampal has had immense experience in the field of biodiversity and wildlife research,and particularly in the area of herpetology. She has worked on biodiversity andenvironment related issues at various stations around the country, including Maharashtra,Tamil Nadu, West Bengal and Andhra Pradesh. She has completed her Masters in Ecologyand Wildlife Biology background at Pondicherry University, Pondicherry. Ms.Tampal iscurrently involved in research on the impacts of climate change on biodiversity. She hasalso designed a programme called VOICE (Volunteers Organized for InitiatingConservation & Education) for both the Urban and Rural youth with the aim of attractingyoung graduates and post graduates to the field of conservation.Mr. Nitin DesaiNitin Desai is one of the foremost figures in the environment movement in India. NitinDesai is associated with many academic organizations and NGOs dealing with economic,social and environmental issues as also security and foreign policy. He has publishedseveral articles and papers on development planning, regional economics, industry,energy and international economic relations. He began his career on the PlanningComission of India in 1973, and subsequently was involved in energy policy work andserved as the Secretary of the Economic Advisory Council to the Prime Minister of India.He was also the Senior Econonomic Advisor on the Brundtland Comission where heintroduced the concept of sustainable development and was responsible for draftingthe key chapters dealing with this aspect in the report of the Commission "Our CommonFuture". He was closely involved in the UN since the 1990s, and held important capacitiesin the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development in 1992, and theWorld Summit on Sustainable Development in 2002.56
  • 57. Team Profiles:Organizing Team P rofiles:Anugraha John:Anugraha John is a young social activist working on issues such as environment, education,culture, cross-cultural dialogue, inter-religious dialogue and other social and sustainabledevelopment programmes both nationally and internationally. He loves teaching ratherfacilitating thematic sessions for children and youth and teaches at few schools, collegesand university both in India and abroad. He is currently heading a non-profit organization,Global Citizens for Sustainable Development based in Bangalore, India. He is one of thePrincipal Organizers working towards an Asian Citizens Assembly to be held in India in2010 which has established cross-cultural dialogue programmes along with partners inChina and Japan since February 2007 such as China-India Forum, Japan-India Forum andChina-India-Japan Forum.Bhavna Kaveti:Bhavna Kaveti is a final year undergraduate student pursuing her graduation in Aurora’sDegree College, Hyderabad. Becoming aware of environmental degradation throughher involvement with WWF-India as a volunteer and a member of the NBSS, she startedcontributing her time and effort with various organizations to work against climate changeand to protect the environment. She regularly participates in workshops, seminars &other activities and events related to the environment, and thus hopes to play a vital rolein spreading awareness amongst youth and children. Climate change being a keystonefor its diversified effect on mankind and the biodiversity around him, she would like tomake herself to be a part and contribute towards mitigation of climate change andadaptation to its effects.Caroline Howe:Caroline Howe has worked around the world on climate education, renewable energyand the international youth climate change movement and graduated from Yale Universityin May 2007 in Mechanical and Environmental Engineering, and has spent the past year inIndia on a public service fellowship from Yale working on climate solutions and climateeducation, with a particular focus on sustainable urban development. While in India, shehas worked with The Energy and Resources Institute in Delhi on their green buildingprograms and their internal carbon footprint assessment; written a song for the WorldHealth Organization on climate change and health; aided IYCN and TERI on climate 57
  • 58. education programs; and is advising the Green Initiatives program at Infosys. With IYCN,Caroline is organizing the Climate Solutions Tour of India, with a goal of raising awarenessabout existing solutions and the need for even more solutions!Deepanjali Gupta:Deepa is a co-founder of the Indian Youth Climate Network (IYCN), a movement aimed tomobilize youth across India into taking action against climate change. IYCN has seengrowth from reaching out to 3 to over 205,000 people within 4 months of its initiation.Her other work has involved being the Indian Coordinator for the Australian Youth ClimateCoalition (AYCC), the peak youth body on climate change in Australia, and also droveAYCC’s faith climate campaign, strongly engaging youth from Hindu, Christian and Islamicbackgrounds. Deepa has previously worked with PricewaterhouseCoopers in their ClimateChange team. She also was the key driver for the cleanenergy campaign at her university,and has represented the youth perspective on climate change to peak tertiary institutionsin Australia.Digu Aruchamy:Digu Aruchamy is a final year undergraduate student in Energy and EnvironmentalEngineering from Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore and has a great passiontowards protecting the environment and climate change. He is the rural coordinatorand active member of the Indian Youth Climate Network since its beginning and is involvedwith the rural energy project. His area of interest is sustainable development and howclimate change mitigation strategies can be coupled to sustainable development indeveloping countries like India. He likes to interact with young people and motivatethem to contribute positively to the environment and is currently involved with thecreation of a green network in Coimbatore which will take up environmental issues in hiscity. He has a wide technical knowledge in the area of renewable energy and climatechange policy.Kartikeya Singh:Kartikeya spent the last year studying the efficacy of renewable energy as a decentralizedenergy solution for rural India while based out of the Centre for Science & Environment(New Delhi). He was specifically analyzing barriers to successful management of ruralrenewable energy systems throughout the country – including solar, wind, micro-hydro,bio-gas, biomass gasification, and bio-diesel systems. His larger field of study is energy58
  • 59. Women at the forefront of the battle against climate change Using creativity to create change 59
  • 60. Expressing hope for a sustainable society through art Affirming commitment in support of the declaration60
  • 61. policy and climate change. In 2007, he received a bachelor’s degree in ecology andsustainable development from Furman University (USA). Despite being an Indian citizen,he was also one of the 22-member US youth delegates to the 2007 UN Climate ChangeConference in Bali, Indonesia. This experience led him to be one of the co-founders ofthe Indian Youth Climate Network.Rabindranath Biswas:Rabindranath Biswas is an avid nature lover, environmentalist and student activist basedin Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh. He is currently pursuing his Masters in Medical Technologyin Manipal University, Mangalore. Along with his friends, he has founded a studentorganization dedicated to the pursuit and continued interest in the pure sciences and innature conservation. He is a long time volunteer with the World Wide Fund for Nature -India, with whom he has visited most of the important natural habitats and wildernessareas in Andhra Pradesh, both on research and on education and on nature camps. In hisspare time, he also volunteers with other nature conservations organizations and groupsin Hyderabad. He is keenly interested in climate change and energy related issues, and isthe founding member of the Hyderabad Climate Alliance, a youth led coalition ofindividuals and organizations based in Hyderabad, interested in climate change and energyrelated issues. Rabindranath Biswas is one of the coordinators of the Indian Youth Summiton Climate Change.Raji Nair:Raji Nair, Creative Head, Campaigns Galore is a social entrepreneur who designs campaignsthat aims to connect the social issues to their right audience. A management graduateand an alumni of the Centre for Social Initiative and Management, she believes thatdevelopment projects can sustain if successful business practices are applied to themwhile retaining their service mission. The power of individuals as advocates of changehas always fascinated her. Apart from being in the organizing team of IYSoCC, she is alsoworking on a campaign on rainwater harvesting ‘Catch Every drop’ and a communicationsworkshop for children called ‘EARTHWORKS’.Vikram Aditya:Vikram aditya is currently working as a Consultant at WWF-India and Oxfam InternationalYouth Partnerships. He has finished his Masters in Zoology, and is involved in grassrootsenvironmental initiatives in Hyderabad with his organization, Friendship Foundation. 61
  • 62. Vikram Aditya writes regularly on climate change and sustainable development relatedissues, and is involved in a school climate change education project with WWF-India inHyderabad. His main areas of interest include climate change and energy, biodiversityand conservation, sustainable development, trade justice, global environmental policiesand participation of youth in environmental movements. He has finished his Masters inZoology in 2006, and has worked earlier with the UNEP and the Sanctuary Asia TigerProgramme. He is closely associated with the UNEP’s South Asian youth programme,South Asia Youth Environmental Network, the Oxfam International Youth Parternshipsand Solar Generation, among other youth environmental initiatives.YOUTH Participants ListName of the Delegates 1. Ms. R. S. Lekshmy leksh1989@yahoo.co.in 2. Ms. Priya Dharshini vicuna19@gmail.com 3. Mr. P. Anand Babup. anandbabu@cgiar.org 4. Ms. Mithika D Cruz mithika@gmail.com 5. Ms. Nidhi Nair catchnidhi@gmail.com 6. Ms. Ritu Singh ritzcool100@gmail.com 7. Ms. Avipsa Mahapatra avipsam@gmail.com 8. Ms. Saritab Mehra greenmunia@yahoo.co.in 9. Mr. Deepak Saini dsainiknp@gmail.com 10. Mr. Jaikant Saini jayknp@yahoo.co.in 11. Mr. Dhavan Saini sainidhavan@gmail.com 12. Mr. Praveen Mehra pmehra27@yahoo.com 13. Ms. Sonali Singh singh_sonali2007@yahoo.com 14. Mr. Prashant Verma prashant.m.verma@gmail.com 15. Ms. Shakuntala Verma sonu_sept29@yahoo.co.in 16. Mr. Chaitanya Kotikalapudi chaitanya.kumarkc@gmail.com 17. Ms. Ruchi Choudhary ruchi.choudhary08@gmail.com 18. Mr. Upmanyu Patil upmanyupatil@gmail.com 19. Ms. Suparana Katyaini suparna.kat@gmail.com62
  • 63. 20. Mr. Faraz Ahmed faraz1186@gmail.com21. Mr. Nathaniel Dkhar ksuidheh@gmail.com22. Ms. Saumya mathur mathursaumya@yahoo.com23. Ms. Amrita Sinha amrita.sinha12@gmail.com24. Mr. Will Bates will@350.org25. Mr. Lingaraj GJ gjlraj@gmail.com26. Ms. Urvashi Devidayal udevidayal@theclimategroup.org27. Ms. Sonia Mishra mishrasonia3@gmail.com28. Mr. Digu Aruchamy29. Mr. Francis Suresh Balan francisenergy@gmail.com30. Ms. Nivedita Shridhar31. Ms. Ruqaya Jabeen raqayajabeen@gmail.com32. Ms. Anne Jayanthi annejayanthi@gmail.com33. Ms. Divya Sharma divyas@teri.resi.in34. Ms. Harini Bhuvaneshwari harinibhuvaneshwari@gmail.com35. Ms. K. Elackiya elackiya.eee@gmail.com36. Mr. R. Suba suba1988@gmail.com37. Ms. E. Deepa Kumari deepakumar8863@gmail.com38. Mr. Wafa Singh wafasingh86@gmail.com39. Ms. J. Jaya Bharathi jayabharthijayapal@gmail.com40. Ms. Prachi Khanna khanna.prachi1206@gmail.com41. Ms. Smita Bhodhankar smitabodhankar@gmail.com42. Ms. Aditi Malhotra malhotraaditi@yahoo.com43. Ms. Aishwarya Dhilip aishwaryadhilip@gmail.com44. Mr. Alberto Galante alberto.galante@garrigues.com45. Ms. Alekhya Banerji alekhya_banerji@yahoo.com46. Mr. Apoorv Vishnoi undefined.196@gmail.com47. Ms. Ashita Anandi ashitaanandi@yahoo.com48. Ms. Radha Kamat radhakamat@gmail.com49. Ms. Choitali Roselin Dey roselindey@gmail.com50. Mr. Faraz Ahmed faraz1186@gmail.com 63
  • 64. 51. Mr. Gideon Zadok Solomon eeesolomon@gmail.com 52. Ms. Himani Upadhyay himani.u@gmail.com 53. Ms. Jaya Bharathi 54. Mr. Kartikeya Singh kartikeya.singh07@gmail.com 55. Mr. Kumaraguru Rajasekhar rkumaraguru@live.com 56. Mr. Sameer Nimbalkar sameer3012004@gmail.com 57. Ms. Monali Patil p.monali@gmail.com 58. Ms. Ashwini Alase ashwini.alase@gmail.com 59. Ms. Neha nehag@teri.res.in 60. Ms. Nitya Aasaavari nitya.aasaavari@gmail.com 61. Ms. Aditi Deshmukh adi.desh@gmail.com 62. Dr. N Rout drnrout@gmail.com 63. Ms. Prachi Singh prachi.singh1987@gmail.com 64. Ms. Revathi Shankar revathi14_88@yahoo.com 65. Ms. Richa Sharma richa.sharma85@gmail.com 66. Ms. Ritu Singh ritzcool100@gmail.com 67. Ms. Ruchi Jain ruchijjain@gmail.com 68. Ms. Saranya G saranya@gmail.com 69. Mr. Siddharth Jude Machado siddarthmachado@gmail.com 70. Ms. Somya Bhatt somyabhatt31@gmail.com 71. Ms. Sonia Mishra mishrasonia3@gmail.com 72. Mr. Tarun Khanna tarun.kh@gmail.com 73. Mr. Umesh Babu umesh@isec.ac.in 74. Ms. Sapna 75. Ms. Vidya Subramanian subramanianvidya@teri.res.in 76. Mr. Vijay vijay.covai@gmail.com 77. Mr. Vinay Tejasvi Y. vinayty@gmail.com 78. Mr. Vivek Coelho vivekcoelho@gmail.com 79. Mr. Prasad Datteraye 80. Ms. Nyla Coelho nylasai@gmail.com 81. Mr. Govind Singh govind029@gmail.com64
  • 65. 82. Ms. Sreepriya83. Ms. Manu Sharma manu@csmworld.org84. Ms. Sumedha sumedhamalaviya@gmail.com85. Ms. Deepanjali Gupta deepanjali_gupta@yahoo.com.au86. Mr. Richie Ahuja87. Mr. Abu Inshah M abuconcord@gmail.com88. Mr. Vishal Bhawe vishalbhave@gmail.com89. Ms. Vanjulavalli Sridhar cutelove_17@yahoo.co.in90. Mr. Vijay Kumar Patil vavpatil@gmail.com91. Ms. Amiya Sharma amiya.sharma@gmailo.com92. Mr. Tushar Arora 00tushar00@gmail.com93. Mr. Chintalapati Sooryendu Vatsal vatsalcss@gmail.com94. Ms. Devalla Shalini Shravanthi devalla.ss@gmail.com95. Mr. Kanishk Sharma Kanishk86.sharma@gmail.com96. Mr. Parul Dhir Paruldhir86@gmail.com97. Mr. Laxmikant Malvadkar mlaxmikant@gmail.com98. Ms. Ekta Kothari99. Mr. Nikunj Jain niks.iit@gmail.com100. Ms. Komal Ramakrishna Komz.712@gmail.com101. Mr. Manjeet Dhakal majitdhakal@gmail.com102. Mr. Navneet Yadav navneetyadav@inbox.com103. Mr. Abhishek Shrestha aviish_27@yahoo.com104. Mr. Rahul Sharma rahulsharma188@gmail.com105. Mr. Rishu Shankar Shandilya rishu.shekhar@gmail.com106. Mr. Arunava Datta arunavadatta@gmail.com107. Mr. Anil Kumar akumar@h5ap.com108. Ms. Manasi Singh manasi.singh@oneworld.net109. Mr. Prashant Verma dsainiknp@gmail.com110. Mr. Rohan kumar rohankumar29@gmail.com111. Mr. Samarjit Khanna samarjit.khanna@gmail.com112. Ms. Shikha Bhasin shikha.bhasin@gmail.com 65
  • 66. 113. Ms. Shveta Kaul kaul.shveta@gmail.com 114. Mr. Siddharth Sareen getpuppycrazy@yahoo.co.in 115. Ms. Amulya Rao reachjovita@gmail.com 116. Mr. Anand S anandkarthic22@gmail.com 117. Mr. Arun Rana arunranain@gmail.com 118. Ms. Divya Kannan divk1@hotmail.com 119. Jessy Preeth Glory jessy_ur_friend@yahoo.co.in 120. Shreya Indukuri ishreya@gmail.com 121. Anugraha John ajohn316@globalcitizens.org.in66
  • 67. Appendices 67
  • 68. Appendix 1: Workshop on “Intergenerational Partnerships for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation” Date: 22nd April – 25th April 2008. Venue: Visthar, Bangalore, India Organized by Global Citizens for Sustainable Development (Bangalore, India) Supporting Partners: Charles Leopold Mayer Foundation Friendship Foundation China-India Forum South Asia Youth Environment Network Summar y Report Summary ReportThe significance of Sustainable Development has increased tremendously since the 1990swith the emergence of global warming as the most urgent environmental anddevelopment issue. The negotiation of the UNFCCC and its Kyoto Protocol hasnecessitated developed nations to commit themselves to sustainable goals, anddeveloping nations to seriously consider mainstreaming sustainability into theirdevelopment agenda. Sustainable development has since become the byword forinternational development and environmental conservation, and has been endorsedglobally through the development of the Millennium Development Goals.There is an immediate need to articulate global efforts by both youth and adults workingtowards sustainability through education, to synchronize this with the global movementagainst climate change, to build intergenerational consensus on issues relating tosustainability and climate change. Although there is a multitude of youth and environmentrelated networks, a concerted effort to assimilate these networks to work towardssustainability with education as a strategic tool has been missing.The International Conference on Environmental Education held at Ahemdabad, India inNovember 2007 brought together individuals and representatives from various youth68
  • 69. and environment related networks, and has effectively demonstrated the efficacy ofeducation as a tool. Youth participants have felt the need to sustain this effort to integrateeducation into sustainable development. Participants have acknowledged the need tocreate a convergence amongst networks especially youth network into an Asian CitizensAlliance through steadfast and resolute action, in order to fight against climate changeand to propagate the values and principles of sustainable development.Taking inspiration from this common aspiration, youth from different organizationsgathered in Bangalore for a workshop on ‘Intergenerational Partnerships for ClimateChange Mitigation and Adaptation’ from 22nd to 25th April 2008.The objectives of this workshop were: 1. To create an Asian Alliance for Intergenerational Partnership for Sustainability sharing common interests, on ESD and climate change. 2. To define the vision, mission, goals and values of the network. 3. To establish a mandate for the alliance for working towards SD through contributing to the fight against climate change. 4. To create an educational guidebook on climate change, which incorporates the goals and fulfils the objectives of ESD. 5. To consult various stakeholders, including civil society representatives, students and youth participants, on the content of the book. 6. To solicit inputs for similar upcoming initiatives on ESD and climate change. 7. To disseminate the content of the guidebook amongst stakeholders. 8. To contribute to the efforts of an Asian Citizens Assembly in 2010 led by the China-India Forum through this Alliance.Day 1Session 1: Causes and Impacts of Climate Change:Mr. Anugraha John representing Global Citizens for Sustainable Development (GCSD),Bangalore, India welcomed the gathering with a thought on Reflection: What is Earth Daymean to youth today? After the self-introduction of each participant, the floor was opento discuss what each participant expected out of the workshop. 69
  • 70. Anugraha John spoke on the idea behind the inception of his organization GCSD, China-India Forum and how he was working to promote the idea of Sustainable Developmentthrough his engagement with young people from Bangalore, in India, across Asia and theglobe. He also spoke on his ideas on climate change and how youth have converged onglobal issues, and how climate change demanded collective youth response. He starteda discussion on the need for Asian Citizens Alliance: an alliance for IntergenerationalPartnership for Sustainability sharing common interests, on ESD, climate change and keyissues where youth can make a difference in the 21st Century.Mr. Shivalingaiah, Managing Director, Karnataka Renewable Energy Development Limited,started the workshop and spoke about the environmental friendly nature of renewableenergy technologies and their role in helping offset emissions and mitigating climatechange. He informed the participants about the different technologies in place inKarnataka and the potential that renewable energy carried in providing uninterruptedpower supply and in meeting the burgeoning power requirements. He was very impressedwith the youth gathering at this workshop to discuss and act on issues most relevant inthe 21st century.Mr. Vikram Aditya, Programme Coordinator, Friendship Foundation and representingthe Hyderabad Climate Alliance, presented on the subject ‘ecosystem sensitivity to globalwarming, a tipping point’. He explained about the various drivers and processes causingclimate change, including forcing effects of Green House Gases and feedback loops. Hefocused on the impacts that climate change would have on different ecosystems, andtheir sensitivity to rise in temperature.Ms. Bhavana Kaveti, Hyderabad Climate Alliance, presented on the observed healthimpacts of climate change and potential impacts in future. This includes increase infrequency and intensity of vector borne diseases and episodes of epidemics, malnutritionand starvation related diseases from reduction in food grain production, stress relateddiseases, water borne diseases and respiratory diseases. Bhavana also discussed thefindings of a project undertaken by her on prevalence of Asthma in Hyderabad, and howthe disease could be aggravated because of increasing temperatures.Session 2: Analysis of climate change training moduleThe draft version of a training module on climate change was presented by thecoordinators to the participants. The module was targeted towards youth and communityworkers and educators working on climate change and sustainable development. The70
  • 71. Mr. Ram Esteeves sharing his experience on pro poor mitigation projects Intergenerational partnerships – the way forward 71
  • 72. Community based positive change in action Going back to the basics for climate action72
  • 73. module not only explained the scientific basis, impacts and mitigation and adaptationmeasure required for climate change, but also incorporated ideas and suggestions onhow sustainable lifestyles could be adopted in order to effectively reduce one’s ecologicalfootprint and thus have a remedial effect on climate change.Day 2Session 1: Youth role in climate change mitigation and adaptationRabindranath Biswas, Hyderabad Climate Alliance, presented on how youth are beingimpacted by climate change and their involvement in its mitigation. He focused hispresentation on the Hyderabad Climate Alliance, a coalition of individuals andorganizations interested in climate change in Hyderabad. He spoke about the evolutionof the Alliance, and highlighted some of the activities that the Alliance would beundertaking in the near future.Kartikeya Singh, from the Indian Youth Climate Network, presented on the Network, itsinspiration and expectations, and discussed in depth the scope of youth involvementwith the IYCN and how the network would greatly benefit youth from across the countryand communicating their aspirations on climate change and networking with each other.Kartikeya also explained the idea behind starting the IYCN, which was to amplify youthvoices from across India to a broader international audience.Sushant Singh, from A N College, Patna, presented on the findings of his study on flowpatterns of the Ganga river at Patna. He discussed the several changes that were observedin the flow of the river due to faster thawing of glacial ice near the headwaters of theGanga, and its possible impacts on river delta communities residing in closeby areas. Healso mentioned about corrective measures being undertaken by researchers and activiststo rectify the Ganga river flow through contributing to climate change mitigation.Aparupa Sengupta, from A N College, Patna, presented on the environmental stress ofthe Ganga river and the pollution in the river from disposal of solid wastes from Patna.Scott Leroy of Pro-World India made a presentation on how Pro-World is working inPeru and other parts of the world to address climate change. He gave a wonderful pictorialpresentation on how we can make much out of renewable energy to address climatechange. 73
  • 74. Session 2:We had a special panel to discuss on the theme: Water and Climate Change by ShreePadre, eminent environmentalist and Rain Water expert and Dr. Bhavani Shankar who hasworked as a Chief Engineer in the Water sector in India.Shree Padre gave an inspiring talk on the importance of water conservation and properwater management that aroused all the participants and inspired them to treat water asa precious and non renewable resource. He dealt in detail with various techniques inpractice across India on rain water preservation and how climate change would have adetrimental impact on water availability and accessibility.Dr. Bhavani Shankar spoke on the relevance of being cautious of water issues in thecontext of Climate Change. He proposed several Mitigation and Adaptations to beundertaken in the water sector. He said we have to incorporate both traditional andmodern practices to encounter issues related to water. He referred to our old scriptures,“Vasudheva Kutumbakam” meaning the whole world is one family to share its resourceswith equity and is akin to the Western saying that the world is a global village to sharethe nature’s gifts.Session 3:VT Padmanabhan made a presentation on Global Dimming with interesting statistics toprove changes in solar radiation and how nuclear war and weapon tests are contributingto Climate Change. He stressed on the fact that Ozone is not healing as predicted andGlobal warming is hastening the ozone depletion. The hole in the Arctic will be as big asthat of the Antarctic in about two decades. This will increase the Ultra Violet radiationaffected the skin of about a billion people. Ultra Violet is lethal to phytoplankton. Thiswill adversely affect the capacity of the ocean sink.Day 3Field trip:One of the highlights of this workshop was a field trip to the site of the first and onlypro poor CDM project in India.The project was being implemented by ADATS, a grassroots community NGO based inBagepalli, Karnataka, and engaged in development and rural upliftment work in nearly74
  • 75. 600 villages around Bhagepalli. ADATS helps form Coolie Sanghas in these villages, whereit helps members generate revenue through a CDM project, which aside from helping inemission reduction, earned income for the Sanghas. The CDM project involved helpingvillagers set up domestic biogas pits from cattle dung, generating cooking gas usingmethane emissions from the dung. Carbon offset from switching to biogas cooking fromusing emission causing firewood would be purchased as credits by the financing agency,and the revenue thus generated would then be returned to the Sanghas.The participants interacted with the head of ADATS, Mr. Ram Esteeves, and learnt fromhim the concept of CDM and its role in sustainable community development, and howCDM was helping offset emissions and mitigate climate change. The participants sharedwith him their ideas of climate change and possible avenues for mitigation. Later, theparticipants visited the CDM project village, interacted with villagers who werebeneficiaries and learnt from them about the CDM project and its benefits.Day 4There was a discussion on Asian Citizens Alliance with students of School of Peace doinga course at Visthar. These students were from countries such as Lao, Indonesia, Nepal,Vietnam, Myanmar, Hong Kong, and other Asian countries. These students along with theparticipants of the workshop felt the need of an Asian Citizens Alliance and wanted theircountries to be part of the Alliance.On the final day, participants reflected on the different presentations and interactions ofthe three days. Most of the participant’s expectation were met and were very happy todiscuss the follow up course of action. Workshop:Outcomes of the Workshop: 1. Participants exchanged ideas on climate change, its impacts across India and the world and gained a good deal of knowledge, especially with the talks from specialists 2. Participants gained new ideas on possible mitigation options available across India and the world that could be replicated 3. Participants learnt about a new facet to the implementation of CDM projects and its impact on sustainable development and rural communities 4. Participants resolved to have a national level youth summit on climate change in 75
  • 76. Hyderabad, to take these discussions on climate change mitigation and youth role forward and to create opportunities for Indian youth to represent their voice at the International summit on Climate Change. 5. To publish the Climate Change guidebook and use that for training and bringing awareness on issues related to Climate Change in India and Asia. 6. To launch a Climate Change and Water Film Festival in India and Asia 7. To launch Asian Citizens Alliance in July 2008 at the China-India-Japan Forum to be held at Tokyo to address issues not just in India but all over Asia on Social and Sustainable Development with Climate Change Mitigation as one of the key issues of the Alliance.Participants at the workshop:Participants Organization/Institution City/StateAparupa Sengupta - A N College - PatnaSushant Singh - A N College - PatnaRabindranath Biswas - Hyderabad Climate Alliance - HyderabadPurnima Kumar - Hyderabad Climate Alliance - HyderabadVikram Aditya - Hyderabad Climate Alliance - HyderabadVijay Aditya - Hyderabad Climate Alliance - HyderabadBhavana Kaveti - Hyderabad Climate Alliance - HyderabadAnugraha John - Global Citizens for Sustainable Development - BangaloreRaju - Global Citizens for Sustainable Development - BangaloreRajeev Kumar - Project Agastya - BangaloreScott Leroy - Pro World Service Corps, India - MysoreStephanie Hooper - Pro World Service Corps, India - MysoreDigu Aruchamy - CoimbatorePriyadarshini - CoimbatoreKartikeya Singh - Indian Youth Climate Network - New DelhiAnuradha Sapte - Global Citizens for Sustainable Development - MumbaiShree Padre - KeralaBhavani Shankar - Sahayoga - BangaloreB Shivalingaiah - KREDL - Bangalore76
  • 77. The dawn of the Asian Citizens Alliance Infusing energy 77
  • 78. Learning from grassroots projects Mr. Shree Padre, sharing his insights on water issues78
  • 79. Appendix 2: Responsibilities Charter of Human Responsibilities (Ethical principles to guide our vision) ResponsibilityNew challenges: new dimensions of ResponsibilityAt present, international life is underpinned by two agreements: the Universal Declarationof Human Rights, which focuses on the dignity and entitlements of people as individualsand on the defence of their rights, and the Charter of the United Nations, which focuseson peace and development. These two agreements have been a framework for undeniableprogress in the organisation of international relations. But the last fifty years have seenradical global changes.Humankind now confronts new challenges; in particular, the imperative to safeguard theenvironment for future generations has come into view. It is clear that the two initialagreements need a further dimension to respond to current and future challenges ofsurvival. ‘Responsibility’ is proposed as an ethical concept which builds on Rights andPeace as well as the emergence of a relational worldview that ensures the viability ofplanet earth and its peoples.PreambleNever before have human beings had such far-reaching impacts on one another’s social,political, economic, and cultural lives. Never before have they possessed so muchknowledge and so much power to change their environment. In spite of the immensepossibilities opened up by these ever-increasing interrelationships, and in spite of thenew skills which humankind has acquired, unprecedented crises are emerging in manyareas.The growing interdependence among individuals, among societies, and between humanbeings and nature heightens the impacts of individual and collective human actions ontheir social and natural environments, in the short and long run.And yet, the social institutions which should enable the new challenges of the 21st centuryto be met, are increasingly ineffective. The pervasive power of international markets is 79
  • 80. undermining the traditional role of states. Scientific institutions, pursuing specializedinterests, are less likely to confront the global issues which challenge humanity.International economic institutions have failed to turn the rising tide of inequality. Businesshas often pursued its profit goals at the expense of social and environmental concerns.Religious institutions have not adequately fulfilled their role to provide responses to thenew challenges faced by our societies.In this context, every one of us must take up his or her responsibilities at both theindividual and the collective level. New possibilities are opening up to play a role in thenew challenges that face humankind: every human being has a role to play in redefiningresponsibility and has responsibilities to assume. The feeling of being powerless can belessened and even overcome by linking up with others to forge a collective strength.Although all people have an equal entitlement to human rights, their responsibilities areproportionate to the possibilities open to them. Freedom, access to information,knowledge, wealth, and power all increase the capacity for exercising responsibilitiesand the duty to account for one’s actions.Responsibilities are related to the present and the future, as well as to past actions. Theburden of collectively-caused damage must be morally acknowledged by the groupconcerned, and put right in practical terms as far as possible. Since we can only partiallyunderstand the consequences of our actions now and in the future, our responsibilitydemands that we must act with great humility and demonstrate caution. Exercise Responsibilities P rinciples to Guide the Exercise of Human Responsibilities 1. We are all responsible for making sure that Human Rights are affirmed in our ways of thinking and in our actions. 2. Every person’s dignity involves contributing to the freedom and dignity of others. 3. Responsibilities include ensuring the fulfilment of human potential, inclusive of material needs and non-material aspirations, as well as obligations to support the common good. 4. Lasting peace can only be expected from freedom, justice, and processes for reconciliation which are respectful of human dignity and human rights. 5. Development and consumption of natural resources to meet human needs, and the quest for prosperity must be backed by a commitment to sustainability and the principle of precaution, assuring pro-active protection of the environment, careful management of80
  • 81. its diversity, and equitable sharing of wealth. 6. The full potential of knowledge and know-how is achieved through valuing different knowledge systems and ways of knowing, sharing them, and applying them in the service of unifying solidarity and a pluralistic culture of peace. 7. Freedom of scientific research implies being guided by ethical criteria such as enhancement of biodiversity, respect for human dignity and non-human forms of life, and regard for the limitations of human knowledge. 8. The exercise of power is legitimate where it serves the common good, and if it is accountable to those over whom it is exercised. 9. In reaching decisions about short-term priorities, evaluation of long-term consequences must concur with ethical priorities of justice and intergenerational environmental stewardship, taking into account both risks and uncertainties. 10. To face the challenges of today and of tomorrow, uniting in action must be balanced with respect for cultural specificities. Responsibility: a k ey notion for the 21st centur y keyWidening economic gaps within and between nations, the concentration of economicand political power in ever-fewer hands, threats to cultural diversity, and theoverexploitation of natural resources are creating unrest and conflicts world-wide andgiving rise to deep concerns about the future of our planet. We are at a crossroads inhuman history.Human beings are part of a ‘woven universe’ which is balanced and integrated in waysthat are still far beyond human knowledge. Given the growing appreciation that humanwell-being is interdependent with earth systems, a re-definition of responsibility is neededin order to extend personal responsibility in the present to collective responsibility forthe future.We can express responsibility in many ways, among them accepting responsibility for thedirect and indirect consequences of our actions in the short as well as the long run,joining with others and uniting for effective action. The fact that responsibility isproportionally linked to knowledge and the exercise of power does not mean that thosewith limited resources and influence would not be in a position to exercise responsibility 81
  • 82. at their own level and link up with others to forge a collective strength.Responsibility is more than an ethical principle to be used at the personal level; rather, itis a commitment we make as citizens who are part of a social identity. The initiative ofthe Charter of Human Responsibilities encourages the exploration of the values thatunderpin this identity. Values and practices: unity and diversityThroughout human history, traditions of wisdom - religious and otherwise - have taughtvalues, to guide human behaviour towards a responsible attitude. Their basic premise,still relevant today, has been that individual and social values influence practices. In fact,practices and values mutually influence each other. Such values include the right to a lifeof dignity and respect for non-human forms of life, a preference for dialogue ratherthan violence, compassion and consideration for others, solidarity and hospitality,truthfulness and sincerity, peace and harmony, justice and equity, and a preference forthe common good rather than self-interest.And yet, there may be times when these values have to be weighed against each other,when an individual or a society faces dilemmas, such as the need to encourage economicdevelopment while protecting the environment and respecting human rights. Theseissues are all interconnected and cannot be addressed separately. Overall responsibleaction implies that different categories of human activity have to be integrated. It requiresthe need for judgment with clarity of thought on values and competing imperatives.Everyone must be aware of the interconnectedness of these imperatives; and even ifpeople’s priorities may differ due to their own histories and present circumstances,those priorities cannot be used as an excuse for ignoring the other issues at stake.Although the sense of responsibility is found among all human groups, there aredifferences in the ways in which responsibility is assumed. In some societies responsibilityis assigned by the group to an individual, rather than taken up at his or her own initiative.In practice, the way in which people are held responsible for their actions varies. Culturaldifferences play an important role when it comes to giving a legal context to the conceptof responsibility. Just as the world’s nations have accepted the idea of ‘Human Rights’, thetime has now come to introduce the concept of ‘Human Responsibilities’. Global co-operation and global governance, indeed, are inconceivable without certain universally82
  • 83. accepted ideas and principles which, whatever their origins, can be considered beneficialto all humankind, non-human life forms and the ecosystems of life. The Charter : its histor y and its present Charter: historyHow it began?After some six years of discussions at various levels within the Alliance for a Responsible,Plural and United World, the Charter of Human Responsibilities was launched in 2001 atthe World Assembly of Citizens, organized by the Charles Léopold Mayer Foundation.The idea was to encourage an international effort of renewed reflection on the relevanceof individual and collective responsibility for the future of humankind and the planet,respect for Human Rights and the achievement of Peace. Subsequently an InternationalCharter Facilitation Committee for the promotion of this Charter was created.Who is involved?Charter activities worldwide are coordinated by members of the International CharterFacilitation Committee and their national or regional Charter committees. They comprisereflection and action with social groups at various levels of society and with professionalgroups. Core funding has been provided by the Charles Léopold Mayer Foundation(Paris), while local activities are also financially supported by a variety of local organisationsand voluntary contributions.A text and a pre-text for dialogue, reflection and actionThe guiding Principles of the Charter are the outcome of a process of intercultural andinterdisciplinary dialogue that began in 1998. Those who participated in the discussionsobviously did not represent humanity as a whole. The Charter is proposed as a tool fordialogue, a starting point, within reach of everyone, towards a reconsideration of theessential meaning and place of responsibility in our societies. The guiding principlesserve as a common nucleus, to be transferred and adapted into different fields of humanendeavour and through translation into culturally appropriate forms.The Charter provides both a pre-text and a text for reflection and action. As a pretext,the Charter’s assertion of a universal principle of human responsibility encouragesreflection on meanings of individual and collective responsibility and invites us to considerhow to act responsibly towards one another and towards the planet. As a text, the Charterdoes not lay down rules; rather it proposes priorities and expresses commitments in our 83
  • 84. everyday lives. The Charter’s principles challenge us to be thoughtful and intentional inour policies and practices.An ongoing processThe Charter has been translated into some 25 languages expressing its content in culturallyappropriate versions. Locally, people are invited to re-define responsibility in their ownsocial and professional context at a time when our interdependence has become bothinevitable and necessary. Reflection is expressed in community forums, workshops, cross-cultural and interfaith conversations, dialogue with local businesses on social responsibility,publications, lesson plans, and also in art, drama, dance and music. The principles of theCharter are reference points, from which all social and professional spheres may drawup their own guidelines for responsibilities. These guidelines are the foundation of asocial agreement that links these sectors to the rest of society. Thus, the emergence of aworldwide consciousness, based on the notion of responsibility, will lead to aninternational social agreement that responds to the needs of the 21st century.Reflection and actionOrganisations and individuals around the world are using the Charter of HumanResponsibilities to reflect on their own situations and inform their actions. The range ofinterpretations, meanings and cultural opportunities has inspired a great diversity ofprojects in different countries. All information is to be found on the Charter web-site: http://www.charter-human-responsibilities.net84

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