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Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
Social Networking and Internet Safety
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Social Networking and Internet Safety

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Youth are getting exposed to high‐tech devices such assmart phones and internet at earlier ages. While there are many benefits of these devices,they have opened up opportunities for others to …

Youth are getting exposed to high‐tech devices such assmart phones and internet at earlier ages. While there are many benefits of these devices,they have opened up opportunities for others to negatively exploit users. This workshopwill educate educators and youth about these predatory activities, ways to avoid them, andwhat to do when you or others encounter them.

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  • Youth are getting exposed to high‐tech devices such as smart phones and internet at earlier ages. While there are many benefits of these devices, they have opened up opportunities for others to negatively exploit users. This workshop will educate educators and youth about these predatory activities, ways to avoid them, and what to do when you or others encounter them. [ Introduction: who you are, where you’re from .] Today I’d like to talk about some things we can do to help keep kids safer online. I’m highlighting suggestions from this publication, Net Cetera, which we have available for you today. Let’s start with a few questions: How many of you have school-aged kids? Or know a kid? What ages? Do they spend time online or on a cell phone? [NOTE TO PRESENTER : This is intended to be a 10-minute presentation if you use just the basic slides. You can lengthen it by adding discussion of any of the specific topics included under ADDITIONAL SLIDES.]
  • these predatory activities, ways to avoid them, and what to do when you or others encounter them.
  • The term Web 2.0 is associated with web applications that facilitate participatory information sharing , interoperability , user-centered design , [1] and collaboration on the World Wide Web . A Web 2.0 site allows users to interact and collaborate with each other in a social media dialogue as creators ( prosumers ) of user-generated content in a virtual community , in contrast to websites where users ( consumers ) are limited to the passive viewing of content that was created for them. Examples of Web 2.0 include social networking sites , blogs , wikis , video sharing sites, hosted services , web applications , mashups and folksonomies .
  • http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/sites/cyber.law.harvard.edu/files/ISTTF_Final_Report-Executive_Summary.pdf
  • http://www.athinline.org/pdfs/MTV-AP_2011_Research_Study-Exec_Summary.pdf
  • http://www.athinline.org/pdfs/MTV-AP_2011_Research_Study-Exec_Summary.pdf
  • Youth are aware that sexting can be a serious problem, but still 1 in 3 have engaged in some form of sexting. Many who “sext” do so as a result of pressure. http://www.athinline.org/pdfs/MTV-AP_2011_Research_Study-Exec_Summary.pdf
  • Youth are aware that sexting can be a serious problem, but still 1 in 3 have engaged in some form of sexting. Many who “sext” do so as a result of pressure. http://www.athinline.org/pdfs/MTV-AP_2011_Research_Study-Exec_Summary.pdf
  • Youth are aware that sexting can be a serious problem, but still 1 in 3 have engaged in some form of sexting. Many who “sext” do so as a result of pressure. http://www.athinline.org/pdfs/MTV-AP_2011_Research_Study-Exec_Summary.pdf
  • http://puresight.com/Cyberbullying/cyber-bullying-statistics.html http://www.cyberbullying.us/research.php http://www.cyberbullying.us/2010_charts/teen_tech_use_2010.jpg
  • http://www.stopbullying.gov/parents/bully_proofing/index.html What You Can Do Talk with your child. Ask for their account of the situation. Be objective and listen carefully. Calmly explain what your child is accused of and ask for an explanation of the incident and their role. Make it clear to your child that you take bullying seriously.   Calmly let them know that you will not tolerate this behavior.  Help your child learn that bullying hurts everyone involved.  Develop clear and consistent rules for your child's behavior. Praise your child when they follow the rules. Decide on fair consequences and follow through if your child breaks the rules.  Spend more time with your child . Carefully supervise and monitor their activities, including when they are online or texting. Be aware of who your child's friends are. Find out how they spend their free time. Build on your child's talents and positive attributes.   Encourage him or her to get involved in social activities.  Work with your child’s school to ensure the bullying does not happen again. Ask the school to keep you informed. Develop strategies together to address bullying. Work together to send clear messages to your child that the bullying must stop. Talk with a school counselor or health professional. They may be able to provide your child with additional help.
  • Trainer: Give a phone number for local law enforcement. Remind the audience not to use 9-1-1 unless it is an emergency.
  • Many of these agencies provide specialized services and assistance. They run 24 hour help lines, provide educational materials, and make referrals for family support groups.
  • Many times an Internet crime falls under a federal jurisdiction. In a non-emergency situation in which you encounter a criminal activity that involves your child, consider contacting law enforcement at the federal level. Trainer: Before moving on to the resource slides, review the objectives you set out in the beginning of the presentation.
  • http://mashable.com/2012/01/03/block-internet-distractions-apps/#view_as_one_page-gallery_box3669 - https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/leechblock/ http://labnol.blogspot.com/2005/12/how-to-access-blocked-websites.html
  • Youth are getting exposed to high‐tech devices such as smart phones and internet at earlier ages. While there are many benefits of these devices, they have opened up opportunities for others to negatively exploit users. This workshop will educate educators and youth about these predatory activities, ways to avoid them, and what to do when you or others encounter them. [ Introduction: who you are, where you’re from .] Today I’d like to talk about some things we can do to help keep kids safer online. I’m highlighting suggestions from this publication, Net Cetera, which we have available for you today. Let’s start with a few questions: How many of you have school-aged kids? Or know a kid? What ages? Do they spend time online or on a cell phone? [NOTE TO PRESENTER : This is intended to be a 10-minute presentation if you use just the basic slides. You can lengthen it by adding discussion of any of the specific topics included under ADDITIONAL SLIDES.]
  • So keeping in mind these risks, the Federal Trade Commission wrote a guide for parents called Net Cetera . It’s based on the idea that the first step to protecting kids online is more about talking than technology. When kids want important information, they turn to their parents. This guide can help parents talk with their kids about being safe online.
  • We often heard from parents – especially those with tech-savvy kids – that they didn’t know where to start. So, for parents who wonder where to begin, here are some tips: Start early : Even toddlers see their parents using communications tools. What toddler doesn’t want to get little hands on a cell phone? As soon as these kids use a computer or phone themselves, it’s time to talk with them about safety. If your kids are already going online: Create an honest, open environment : Listen to what kids have to say, and be supportive. Initiate conversations : Don’t wait for kids to come to you. Use everyday chances to talk with kids: news stories about cyberbullying, a storyline on TV – both can be the start of a worthwhile conversation.
  • Communicate your values – and how they apply online: You’re the only one in a position to guide your kids this way. Be very clear with kids about this. It’ll help them make smarter decisions when they’re faced with tricky situations. Be patient : Most kids need small bits of information repeated – and often – for it to really sink in. Keep talking; chances are it’ll pay off.
  • Kids need different levels of attention and guidance at different ages – and it’s really up to you to decide where your own kids fit. Starting with very young kids , it’s a good idea to supervise them while they’re online – maybe even choosing the sites they can visit. As they’re ready to explore a little more, consider limiting their exploration to sites you’ve already checked out and that you think are OK for their educational and entertainment value. Moving on to tweens , aged 8-12, who usually are ready to explore a bit more on their own – it’s still a good idea to be close by. Having the computer in a family area is a good idea. Parents also may want to talk about how much time their tween can spend online.
  • By the time kids are teenagers, many are ready for more independence from their parents. They’re starting to form their own values and reflecting those of their friends. But that doesn’t mean there’s no point in talking with them. Teens have access to the internet through their mobile devices, phones, their computers and their friends computers, so it’s really hard to watch what they do. It doesn’t hurt to reinforce ‘good citizenship’ messages with teens, along with three important messages that many need to hear: Not all information is credible: just because it’s posted, doesn’t mean it’s so. Once they post something, there’s no taking it back. It’s out there in the world. No matter how impersonal it seems, screen names, profiles and avatars belong to people with real feelings. Treat them the way you’d like to be treated.
  • The booklet is called Net Cetera for a reason: it covers other subjects you might want to talk about with kids: safe social networking how to handle cyberbullying what to do about sexting (which boils down to “don’t do it”) managing mobile applications understanding social mapping (a kind of GPS in mobile phones that lets people know where you are), and protecting your computer. Net Cetera also talks about phishing, parental controls, file sharing, cell phone etiquette – those subjects parents need to know to talk with their kids about being safe online.
  • In case you’d like more copies, or if you belong to any groups that might be able to use copies, please feel free to pass it on! There are a few ways you can do that: Net Cetera is posted at OnGuardOnline.gov, the federal government’s online safety website. You’ll find the full document there, as well as a button you can grab and post on your own website. [eventually…] You can also copy sections of the guide to use in newsletters, blogs – however you can use it. The booklet is in the public domain. You also may want to order free copies at the FTC’s bulk order site: bulkorder.ftc.gov. They’re free, and they’re available in both English and Spanish.
  • [NOTE TO PRESENTER : The first section is a basic presentation lasting about 10-15 minutes. If you’d like to add any of these topics, simply copy these slides before Slide #9. We suggest you still finish with Slides # 10-11.]
  • Adults often see socializing online and offline as separate activities, each with its own rules. Kids see it all as socializing, whether it’s online or off – and it’s good to talk with them about how they act online. Even the most tech-savvy kids can use some reminders about their online behavior: What they do online can have real-world consequences – the words they use and what they post can have a big impact on others, and on themselves. Remind kids that, once they post something, they can’t take it back. It’s a message that’s worth repeating, especially since the colleges and jobs kids may eventually want to get into will be checking their social networking profiles. While most kids are good at just deleting things they think are annoying or creepy, tell kids to trust their gut if they’re suspicious about anything – and to tell you about it. You can help them report it to the police and the social networking site. It’s a good idea to remind kids to keep personal information private. Kids should avoid posting things like where they go to school, their address or phone number.
  • Cyberbullying is harassment or bullying that happens online, and it can happen on social networking sites, in IMs, emails, text messages, and in games. Recent research shows that this is the online safety issue that kids are most worried about. Again, the advice is to talk to your kids. Ask them to tell you if an online message makes them feel threatened or hurt. The same goes for images. Keep an open channel of communication with your child and hopefully he or she will come to you. Tell your kids that they can’t hide behind the worlds they type or the images they post. None of us want to think that our kid might be bullying other kids. Still, remind your child that hurtful messages can make the sender look bad, and sometimes even bring punishment from the authorities.
  • If your child has a problem with a bully, tell him or her not to react. Bullies are looking for a response, so don’t give them one. Encourage your kid to talk with you about what’s going on, and to help you save the evidence. If the bullying keeps up, share the record with the school or the police. If you ever fear for your child’s safety, immediately contact the police. Block the bully online: remove him or her from “friend” or “buddy” lists, and block the email address. If your child’s social networking profile has been changed or created without his permission, get in touch with the company that runs the site to have it taken down. Tell your kid that she can help stop cyberbullying by telling the bully to stop, and by not passing on mean messages.
  • As communications have gone mobile, so has kids’ ability to constantly stay in touch. The fundamentals of common sense and common courtesy apply, regardless of where communications take place. Establish rules about when and where it’s appropriate to use their cell phones. Can they text at the dinner table? Do they have to give you their phone when they’re supposed to be doing homework or sleeping? Consider the example you’re setting: do you do the things you forbid your kids to do? Remember that it’s illegal to text, surf, or talk on the phone while driving in many states – and it’s dangerous in all of them. And your kids are watching. Talk to your kids about using their manners on cell phones and online (since many of them get online through their phones). Remind them to treat people the way they’d like to be treated.
  • Talk with your kids about privacy and safety. Most mobile phones allow photo- and video-sharing, which can be fun and creative – but can also cause issues about personal privacy and reputation. Encourage kids to think about their privacy – and that of others – before posting a picture or video. With mobile phones, it’s easy to post a picture without the OK of the person in the picture, but that can be embarrassing and even unsafe. Better to think first than do damage control later. Smart phones let kids check and update their social networking pages on the go. Remember that any filters you’ve set up on the home computer don’t apply on the phone. Encourage your child to use good sense when social networking from their phone.
  • The phone itself, as well as the mobile carrier, should give you some options about privacy settings and child safety controls. You often can turn off things like web access, downloading, or texting. Other phones let you set the number of minutes used, limit internet access, and provide number privacy. Ask your carrier what tools are available on your plan and your phone, and find out what they cost. (There may be extra charges for these features.) Do you know about social mapping? It’s GPS technology that’s in many cell phones now, and kids can use it to pinpoint where their friends are – or be pinpointed by their friends. Tell your kids to use this feature only with friends they know in person and trust – and not to broadcast their location to the world. You might want to check: some carriers have GPS services that let parents map their kid’s location.
  • Bullet 1: Some sites will allow only a defined community of users (members only/registered users) to access posted content, while others allow anyone to view postings Bullet 2: Consider restricting access to your personal page of information that you post (e.g., limit access to your family, friends, your team, a club, etc.). Bullet 3: Don’t post your full name, Social Security number, address, phone number, school name, exact age, etc. Bullet 4: Your screen name should make you anonymous; don’t use obvious information in your screen name such as your age, hometown, pet name, or part of your real name
  • Bullet 2: Even if you delete the information, people could have downloaded the information already or older versions of your information can exist on other peoples’ computers. Bullet 3: Your photo can be altered and distributed in ways that you may not be happy about. Never post sexually provocative pictures. Bullet 4: People lie about who they really are. You never know who you could be dealing with.
  • Bullet 1: Make this time quality time with your children while showing them safe and responsible online surfing and socializing techniques. Bullet 4: Be open with your child about the rules from the beginning. You may want to consider having your child sign a contract with clearly stated rules. Also, learn about parental control tools.
  • Bullet 1: Do not have the computer in your child’s room. In this way you can easily monitor your child while they are surfing and/or socializing online. Bullets 2 and 3: Software is available to monitor your child’s online experience while you are not at home or unable to monitor your child personally. Bullet 4: Sites may allow you to request an immediate cancellation of your child’s account.
  • Bullet 1: Don’t post anything that you wouldn’t want the world to know (e.g., your phone number, address, Social Security number, or other vital info). It makes it easier for a stranger or online predator to find you. Bullet 2: While it may be fun to connect with friends from all over the world, avoid meeting someone in person you do not fully know. Bullet 3: If you feel someone’s behavior is inappropriate, react. Talk with your parents, a trusted adult, or report it to the authorities. Bullet 5: Think twice before posting a photo or information you know your parents would not approve of.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Internet Safety Fahzy Abdul-Rahman Family Resource Management Specialist fahzy@nmsu.edu ::: @nmmoney &
    • 2. SM Internet Safety <ul><li>Social Media (SM) </li></ul><ul><li>Definition </li></ul><ul><li>Examples </li></ul><ul><li>SM Internet Safety </li></ul><ul><li>Predatory Activities </li></ul><ul><li>Ways to Avoid, and </li></ul><ul><li>What to do when you or others encounter them </li></ul>
    • 3. Social Media (SM) <ul><li>The use of web-based and mobile technologies to turn communication into an interactive dialogue. </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;a group of Internet-based applications that build on the ideological and technological foundations of Web 2.0 , and that allow the creation and exchange of user-generated content .“ (Kaplan & Haenlein ) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Social media is media for social interaction as a superset beyond social communication. </li></ul></ul>
    • 4. What we Cover Today! > 250 SM Applications
    • 5. SM Internet Safety <ul><li>Predatory Activities </li></ul><ul><li>What to Do </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Signs of Those Getting Involved </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Predator </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Prey </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Ways to Avoid </li></ul>
    • 6. SM Predatory Activities <ul><li>Cyber bullying + harassment </li></ul><ul><li>Scams </li></ul><ul><li>Sexual predation </li></ul><ul><li>Scams </li></ul><ul><li>Other Harmful, Problematic and Illegal contents </li></ul>Inappropriate Conduct, Contact, Content
    • 7. A Thin Line Study <ul><li>Respondents were recruited from KnowledgePanel ® </li></ul><ul><ul><li>the only online panel that is representative of the U.S. population. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>n=631 teens ages 14-17 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>n=724 adults ages 18-24 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Subject: Sexting, digital harassment and digital dating abuse </li></ul><ul><ul><li>2011 & 2009 </li></ul></ul>
    • 8. <ul><li>76% of 14-24 year olds - digital abuse is a serious problem </li></ul><ul><li>56% experienced abuse through social and digital media ::: up from 50% in 2009 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Abuse types: Untrue (26%), mean (24%) and forwarding a private IM or message (20%) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Young women (82%) and non-whites (80%) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>men (70%) or whites (73%). </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Perpetrators are usually people known well </li></ul>I. Overall digital abuse incidence
    • 9. <ul><li>71%: sexting a serious problem for people their age </li></ul><ul><li>⅓ have engaged in some form or texting </li></ul><ul><ul><li>15% sent naked photos/videos of themselves </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>~ ½ of them felt pressured to do so </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>21% received naked pictures or videos of others </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>33% received texts/online messages with sexual words </li></ul></ul>II. Sexting and digital dating abuse What’s the problem here?
    • 10. <ul><li>71% likely to use slurs online or in text messages than in person </li></ul><ul><li>~ ½ regularly observes people use discriminatory language in social media </li></ul><ul><li>Groups: Overweight (54%); LGB (51%); African-American (45%); women (44%); and immigrants (35%). </li></ul><ul><li>Among the words tested,: “that’s so gay” (65%); “slut” (55%); “fag” (53%); “retard” (53%); and “nigger” (42%).`` </li></ul>III. Digital discrimination
    • 11. <ul><li>Asking the person to stop it </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Effective: 47% </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Worse: 14% </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>No effect: 27% </li></ul></ul><ul><li>67% reported that changing their email address, screen name or cell phone number made things better. </li></ul><ul><li>59% said deleting their social networking profile ameliorated the situation. </li></ul>IV. Effective responses
    • 12. Cyberbullying <ul><li>Cyberbullying.us </li></ul><ul><li>Patchin, J. W. & Hinduja, S. (2010). Trends in online social networking: Youth use of MySpace over time. New Media & Society, 12 (2), 197-216. </li></ul>Study #2
    • 13.  
    • 14.  
    • 15.  
    • 16. Male or Female?
    • 17. SM & Internet Safety
    • 18. Bullying Signs: Predator <ul><li>Becomes violent with others </li></ul><ul><li>Gets into physical or verbal  fights with others </li></ul><ul><li>Gets sent to the principal’s office or detention a lot </li></ul><ul><li>Has extra money or new belongings that cannot be explained </li></ul><ul><li>Is quick to blame others </li></ul><ul><li>Will not accept responsibility for their actions </li></ul><ul><li>Has friends who bully others </li></ul><ul><li>Needs to win or be best at everything </li></ul>
    • 19. Bullying Signs: Prey (1 of 3) <ul><li>Comes home with damaged or missing clothing or other belongings </li></ul><ul><li>Reports losing items such as books, electronics, clothing, or jewelry </li></ul><ul><li>Has unexplained injuries </li></ul><ul><li>Hurts themselves </li></ul><ul><li>Are very hungry after school from not eating their lunch </li></ul><ul><li>Runs away from home </li></ul><ul><li>Loses interest in visiting or talking with friends </li></ul><ul><li>Is afraid of going to school or other activities with peers </li></ul>
    • 20. Bullying Signs: Prey (2 of 3) <ul><li>Complains frequently of headaches, stomachaches, or feeling sick </li></ul><ul><li>Has trouble sleeping or has frequent bad dreams </li></ul><ul><li>Has changes in eating habits </li></ul><ul><li>Loses interest in school work or begins to do poorly in school </li></ul><ul><li>Appears sad, moody, angry, anxious or depressed when they come home </li></ul><ul><li>Talks about suicide </li></ul><ul><li>Feels helpless </li></ul>
    • 21. Bullying Signs: Prey (3 of 3) <ul><li>Often feels like they are not good enough </li></ul><ul><li>Blames themselves for their problems </li></ul><ul><li>Suddenly has fewer friends </li></ul><ul><li>Avoids certain places </li></ul><ul><li>Acts differently than usual </li></ul>
    • 22. Stop Online Delinquencies <ul><li>Prey </li></ul><ul><li>Help them understand the nature of these delinquencies </li></ul><ul><li>Keep open lines of communication </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage them to pursue their interests </li></ul><ul><li>Teach them to stand against it </li></ul><ul><li>Talk about asking for help </li></ul><ul><li>Know what’s going on </li></ul><ul><li>Predator </li></ul><ul><li>Talk to them </li></ul><ul><li>Make them understand the severity of these conducts </li></ul><ul><li>Develop clear and consistent rules </li></ul><ul><li>Spend more time with them </li></ul><ul><li>Be aware of their friends and activities </li></ul><ul><li>Work together with involved parties </li></ul>
    • 23. Reporting Trouble When discussions does not seem to resolve the situation …
    • 24. Whom To Contact for Help <ul><li>Local Police </li></ul><ul><li>There is no national agency that deals with every type of Internet crime. Your local law enforcement is your best first resource. </li></ul>National Crime Prevention Council www.ncpc.org
    • 25. Whom To Contact (continued) <ul><li>National Child Advocacy Groups </li></ul><ul><li>Suicide Prevention Hotline: 800-SUICIDE </li></ul><ul><li>Runaway Hotline: 800-231-6946 </li></ul><ul><li>National Council for Child Abuse and Family Violence: 800-222-2000 </li></ul><ul><li>ChildHelp USA National Child Abuse Hotline: </li></ul><ul><li>800-4-A-Child </li></ul><ul><li>National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information: 800-729-6686 </li></ul><ul><li>The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (child sexual exploitation): 800-843-5678 </li></ul>National Crime Prevention Council www.ncpc.org
    • 26. Whom To Contact (continued) <ul><li>Federal Law Enforcement </li></ul><ul><li>Federal Bureau of Investigation (child-luring, an adult meets a child face-to-face): Call your state office. </li></ul><ul><li>US Customs Service (child pornography): 800-BE-ALERT </li></ul><ul><li>US Postal Inspection Service: usps.gov </li></ul><ul><li>Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms: 888-ATF-TIPS </li></ul><ul><li>Drug Enforcement Administration: usdoj.gov/dea </li></ul><ul><li>Source: GetNetWise </li></ul>National Crime Prevention Council www.ncpc.org
    • 27. What to Do to Avoid <ul><li>Watch for Cues – prey and predator </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Covered previously </li></ul></ul><ul><li>History </li></ul><ul><li>Block Sites </li></ul><ul><li>Other Internet Tools </li></ul><ul><li>… </li></ul>
    • 28. History <ul><li>CTRL + H </li></ul><ul><li>Do individually for each of your internet browser </li></ul><ul><ul><li>IE, FF, Chrome, Safari </li></ul></ul>
    • 29. History <ul><li>NOTE: History can be cleaned </li></ul>
    • 30. Block Sites <ul><li>Step 1: Click the Start button and select Run. </li></ul><ul><li>notepad c:WINDOWSsystem32driversetchosts </li></ul><ul><li>Step 2: Type the following: </li></ul><ul><li>127.0.0.1 orkut.com 127.0.0.1 facebook.com 127.0.0.1 myspace.com </li></ul><ul><li>Save the file and exit. </li></ul><ul><li>NOTE : our children are also very smart. </li></ul>Open DNS
    • 31. <ul><li>Adds On: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Customized to the internet browser you are using </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>E.g. Firefox ::: Cold Turkey, Big Brother, LeechBlock </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Safe Search: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Google Safe Search </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Chrome: Personal Blocklist </li></ul></ul>Block Sites
    • 32. Other Internet Tools <ul><li>Content Advisor </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Child safety tools </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Filter – based on reputation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Not all sites report </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Not full tools </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>On IE </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Open DNS </li></ul>
    • 33. Other Internet Tools <ul><li>Keyloggers: Keystroke logging </li></ul><ul><li>Screen Capturing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Netnanny </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Best: Different log-in with increased safety </li></ul>
    • 34. The Best Thing to Do …
    • 35. Internet Safety Fahzy Abdul-Rahman Family Resource Management Specialist fahzy@nmsu.edu ::: @nmmoney &
    • 36. Resources <ul><li>FTC: Social Networking Sites: Safety Tips for Tweens and Teens </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/pubs/consumer/tech/tec14.shtm </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Google: “FTC Teens Social Networking” </li></ul></ul>
    • 37. Talking with Kids <ul><li>It’s more about talking than technology. </li></ul>
    • 38. Where to Start <ul><li>Start early </li></ul><ul><li>Create an honest, open environment </li></ul><ul><li>Initiate conversations </li></ul>
    • 39. Where to Start <ul><li>Communicate your values – and how they apply online </li></ul><ul><li>Be patient </li></ul>
    • 40. Guidance for Different Ages <ul><li>Young kids </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Close, hands-on supervision </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Tweens </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Guided exploration </li></ul></ul>
    • 41. Guidance at Different Ages <ul><li>Teens </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Independent, with mobile access </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Important messages: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Information credibility </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Once it’s posted, you can’t take it back </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Treat people the way you’d like to be treated </li></ul></ul></ul>
    • 42. Net Cetera : What Else? <ul><li>Other subjects in Net Cetera : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Social networking </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cyberbullying </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sexting </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mobile applications </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Social mapping </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Protecting your computer </li></ul></ul>
    • 43. Net Cetera : Spread the Word! <ul><li>Please pass it on: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Clubs, teams, PTAs, school districts, classes… </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Put a button or text on your website: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>OnGuardOnline.gov </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Order more: http://bulkorder.ftc.gov </li></ul><ul><li>It’s FREE (and available en español ) </li></ul>
    • 44. Net Cetera <ul><li>Questions? </li></ul><ul><li>THANKS! </li></ul>
    • 45. Additional Slides (please copy them into the body of the presentation, after the slide about Teens)
    • 46. Socializing Online <ul><li>Socializing is socializing – online or off </li></ul><ul><li>Reminders: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Online actions have real-world consequences </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Careful when posting – you can’t take it back </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tell kids to trust their gut if they’re suspicious </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Help kids understand what info should stay private </li></ul></ul>
    • 47. Cyberbullying <ul><li>Harassment that happens online </li></ul><ul><li>Talk to your kids: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Encourage them to tell you if an online message or image makes them feel threatened or hurt </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tell your kids they can’t hide behind what they post </li></ul></ul>
    • 48. Cyberbullying <ul><li>If your kid has a problem with a bully, don’t react to the bully </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Encourage your kid to talk with you about what’s up </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Save the evidence </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Block the bully online </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Have any bogus profiles taken down </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Encourage your kid to help stop cyberbullying – by not passing on other messages and telling the bully to stop. </li></ul>
    • 49. Mobile Phones <ul><li>More and more kids go online from their phones </li></ul><ul><li>Develop cell phone rules: when and where they can use their phones </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Set an example by what you do </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Use their manners on cell phones, too </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Treat people the way they’d like to be treated </li></ul></ul>
    • 50. Mobile Phones <ul><li>Think about privacy and safety </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Photo- and video-sharing on the go </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Filters on home computers don’t apply on phones </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Talk to kids about using good sense when social networking on their phone </li></ul></ul>
    • 51. Mobile Phones <ul><li>Choose the right options and features for your kid’s phone </li></ul><ul><li>Find out about social mapping </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Is your kid’s phone GPS-enabled? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Talk to kids about using features only with friends they know and trust. </li></ul></ul>
    • 52. Tips for Safe Online Social Networking National Crime Prevention Council www.ncpc.org
    • 53. Tips for Socializing Safely <ul><li>Think about how different sites work before deciding to join a site. </li></ul><ul><li>Keep some control over the information you post. </li></ul><ul><li>Keep vital information to yourself. </li></ul><ul><li>Make sure your screen name doesn’t reveal too much about you. </li></ul>National Crime Prevention Council www.ncpc.org
    • 54. Tips for Socializing Safely Online (continued) <ul><li>Post only information that you are comfortable with others seeing and knowing about you. </li></ul><ul><li>Remember, once your information is posted, you can’t take it back. Someone can forward this information and millions of people have access. </li></ul><ul><li>Consider not posting your picture. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t flirt with strangers online. </li></ul><ul><li>Source: Federal Trade Commission – www.ftc.gov </li></ul>National Crime Prevention Council www.ncpc.org
    • 55. Tips for Parents National Crime Prevention Council www.ncpc.org
    • 56. Tips for Parents <ul><li>Use the Internet with your children. </li></ul><ul><li>Teach your children never to give out personal information. </li></ul><ul><li>Instruct your child never to plan a face-to-face meeting with online acquaintances. </li></ul><ul><li>Establish clear ground rules for Internet use within your family. </li></ul><ul><li>Tell your children not to respond if they receive offensive or dangerous email, chat requests, or other types of communication and to tell you when this occurs. </li></ul><ul><li>Source: GetNetWise </li></ul>National Crime Prevention Council www.ncpc.org
    • 57. Tips for Parents (continued) <ul><li>Place your computer in a room that’s open and accessible to all family members. </li></ul><ul><li>Consider installing software filters that prevent your child from entering personal information. </li></ul><ul><li>Consider installing monitoring software that prevents your child from entering personal information. </li></ul><ul><li>Many networking sites have valuable safety information. </li></ul>National Crime Prevention Council www.ncpc.org
    • 58. Tips for Youth National Crime Prevention Council www.ncpc.org
    • 59. Tips for Youth <ul><li>Remember, your profile is on a public space. </li></ul><ul><li>People aren’t always who they say they are. </li></ul><ul><li>Harassment, hate speech, and inappropriate content should be reported. Tell your parents or an adult if this happens. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t mislead people into thinking that you’re older or younger than you really are. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t post anything that would embarrass you later. </li></ul><ul><li>Source: myspace.com </li></ul>National Crime Prevention Council www.ncpc.org
    • 60. Tips for Youth (continued) <ul><li>Always follow your family’s rules for using the Internet. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t open up emails, files, or web pages that you get from people you don’t really know or trust. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t ever do anything that could cost your family money unless your parents are there to help you do it. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t ever give out your password. </li></ul><ul><li>Source: GetNetWise </li></ul>National Crime Prevention Council www.ncpc.org

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