Bill of rights
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Bill of rights

on

  • 895 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
895
Views on SlideShare
895
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Bill of rights Presentation Transcript

  • 1. First Amendment Rights The Five Freedoms 2
  • 2. 1. What are civil liberties?  The freedoms we have to think and act without government interference or fear of unfair treatment 3
  • 3. Know Your Rights!    Can you name any of the specific rights guaranteed by the First Amendment? In the U.S. is it legal to burn the flag as a means of political protest? Can a public university censor a student newspaper? 4
  • 4. Facts     If you didn’t know the answers to the previous questions you are not alone! Only 17% of Americans could name all five freedoms guaranteed in the First Amendment. Only 25% of students knew it was legal to burn the flag in protest. As far as censoring a student newspaper at a public university, it is against the law. 5
  • 5.  A bill of rights is a statement of an individual citizen’s legal privileges which may not be taken away by a civil government. The concept of a bill of rights comes from English constitutional history, where a feudal contract between a king and his subjects limited his powers and increased the privileges of the subjects. Amendments 2-8 of the American Bill of Rights consist of long-standing civil and legal rights of individual citizens recognized both English and American common law. Page 154 in book 5
  • 6. Forty-Five Important Words The First Amendment Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. 6
  • 7. 8
  • 8. 3. What does the 1st amendment prohibit Congress from doing concerning religion?  Congress cannot establish an official religion in the United States  The Establishment Clause 9
  • 9. 4. What else does it protect concerning religion?  Guarantees Americans the right to practice their faith as they wish   Free-Exercise Clause They may not favor one religion over another or treat people differently because of their personal beliefs 10
  • 10. Students & Religion As students, it’s important to know your religious rights in school. 1. 2. 3. You are free to pray alone or in groups, as long as the activity is not disruptive and does not infringe upon the rights of others. As long as it is not disruptive, disrespectful of the rights of other students, and does not pressure or coerce others, you can exercise your faith. Schools cannot organize religious activities. This includes making students pray. 11
  • 11. REMEMBER:   The government cannot force you to believe in any religion. Everybody has the right to practice the faith they believe in, when and where they want to. Thanks for the First Amendment, we are all guaranteed the freedom of religion. KNOW YOUR RIGHTS!!!!!! 12
  • 12. Freedom of Speech  Free speech is the liberty to speak and express one’s opinions. It is the right to express ideas, information, opinions, etc. with very limited government restrictions. 13
  • 13. 5. What types of communication are protected under freedom of speech?      Face to face Internet communication Art Music Clothing 14
  • 14.  Free speech includes the right to criticize public officials, politicians, religious leaders, and public and corporate policies. Without this right a democratic nation could not survive. 15
  • 15.  "I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it". Commonly attributed to Voltaire 16
  • 16. Freedom of the Press  6. What does press and media include?       Books Newspapers Magazines Radio Television Internet 17
  • 17. 7. How does freedom of press limit the government?   The government cannot practice censorship. It cannot ban printed materials or films merely because they contain alarming or offensive ideas 18
  • 18.   The press is often called “the fourth branch of government.” It helps to keep the other three branches in check. Without a free press, this would not be possible, and the democratic conditions which we are used to, and enjoy in the United States, would not exist. 19
  • 19. 8. What rights are covered by the freedom of assembly?  Protects our right to gather in groups for any reason, so long as the assemblies are peaceful.   They can make rules about when and where, but cannot ban them. We also have the right to form and join social clubs, political parties, and labor unions. 20
  • 20. 21
  • 21. Life without Freedom of Assembly  People would not be allowed to peacefully gather in large groups without permission  It would be harder to protest opinions and use the other freedoms guaranteed in the first amendment 22
  • 22. 9. What does freedom of petition allow the citizens to do?  The right to express one’s idea to the government.  Petition = formal document 23
  • 23. 24
  • 24. Life Without Freedom of Petition  People could be penalized for political views and beliefs.  People would be unable to communicate with their senators and congressmen 25
  • 25. Harry S. Truman, 1950  “In a free country we punish men for crimes they commit but never for the opinions they have.” 26
  • 26. 10. Name some of the limits to freedom of speech.     Do not have the freedom to provoke a riot Cannot speak or write in a way that leads immediately to criminal activities or efforts to overthrow the government by force May not spread lies that harm a person’s reputation May not interfere with the rights of others 27
  • 27. 11. What are the two ways someone can spread lies about someone else?   Slander = spreading spoken lies Libel = printed lies 28
  • 28. 12. Although we have many individual freedoms, whose rights come first?  The rights of the community  Otherwise, the society would break apart 29
  • 29. On Moodle: Rate the five First Amendment freedoms: religion, speech, press, assembly, and petition in order of importance to you and WHY. I want to know WHY you ranked them this way. 29