jogo talk at 3Dcamp 2010
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jogo talk at 3Dcamp 2010

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jogo is a tabletop tangible music interface that has been developed to explore the potential of open-ended play materials and music making as a way of encouraging free play. A prototype of jogo has ...

jogo is a tabletop tangible music interface that has been developed to explore the potential of open-ended play materials and music making as a way of encouraging free play. A prototype of jogo has been developed as part of ongoing research to investigate how the provision of a tangible play experience can encourage both children and adults to play freely in a more physical way, while socially interacting with others around them.

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  • Who I amWhat I’m here to presentWhat I’m going to talk about todayBackground – where the idea started from, my motivation and interestDesign – the process, the designPrototype – the build, the technologyPlay – evaluation, observation at DAWNDiscussion – what all this showsFuture Work – what next
  • My personal motivation – decline, children missing out on what we had as children, adults needing a break from the stress and strain of everyday lifeNeed for play – for children and for adults – why its important for bothThe benefits of free open-ended playHuizinga, Stuart Brown, The Play Ethic, Lego Serious PlayPlays importance for childrenFor healthy child development – social skills, dexterityHuizingaIn his book, ‘Homo Ludens’ or ‘Man the Player’, he discusses play, presenting a study of the play element of culture, describing man the player and the importance of the “eternal play-element” of culture. Huizinga describes play as a function of the living that “is not susceptible ofexact definition either logically, biologically or aesthetically”. Play presents itself to us as “an interlude in our daily lives” and can be characterised as relaxation that is regularly recurring and that becomes an integral part of life. Play enhances life and can be seen as a necessity both for man as an individual, as a “life function” and for society because of its significance and its spiritual and social association. In his writing, Huizinga attempts to redefine and elevate the significance of play“The opposite of play is not work. It’s depression.”Brian Sutton-Smith“We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing.”George Bernard Shaw“Of all animals, humans are the biggest players of all”Stuart Brown, a medical doctor, psychiatrist, clinical researcher, and the founder of the National Institute for Play.“We are designed by nature and evolution to continue to play throughout life. Life-long play is central to our continued well-being, adaptation, and social cohesiveness.”Stuart Brown
  • What am I trying to do in my workMove the focus of play away from direct interaction with technology with forms of computer desktop and video gaming systems
  • Back to more free, tangible, physical playThe kind of play we used to do when we were youngerThe kind of play that is crucial for healthy child development
  • My personal motivation – decline, children missing out on what we had as children, adults needing a break from the stress and strain of everyday lifeNeed for play – for children and for adults – why its important for bothThe benefits of free open-ended playHuizinga, Stuart Brown, The Play Ethic, Lego Serious Play
  • My personal motivation – decline, children missing out on what we had as children, adults needing a break from the stress and strain of everyday lifeNeed for play – for children and for adults – why its important for bothThe benefits of free open-ended playHuizinga, Stuart Brown, The Play Ethic, Lego Serious Play
  • Background – where the idea started from, my motivation and interestDesign – the process, the designPrototype – the build, the technologyPlay – evaluation, observation at DAWNDiscussion – what all this showsFuture Work – what next
  • Need for play – for children and for adults – why its important for bothThe benefits of free open-ended playHuizinga, Stuart Brown, The Play Ethic, Lego Serious PlayA user centered approach places a focus on the user – their needs, abilities, their feedback – taking them into account at every step of the way, from research right through to design and prototyping and evaluationDuring development of jogo an emphasis was placed on potential users and the task of free play, involving them in different ways Different methods of data gathering were used to cover the target groups of the project - it was necessary to gather an understanding of the different ages, what is important to them, what motivates them in play, identifying different requirements for the designResearch - literature - interviews -créche & montessori visit - observation - focus groups (online, informal & one formal planned) - cork trip to wooden toy section of street performanceFacebook group, survey, trip to cork, several informal focus groups or just questioning – I was lucky that I got to play and have fun and it was technically research!
  • Focus for design – design requirements drawn up or concluded from research stageWhat was taken from the research – what was important for the design stage:- tangibles were identified as important for play for both children and adults – children: building blocks, duplo, lego, adults: lego, card puzzles or something to figure out or explore for both children and adults interview with school teacher and créche and montessori visitor: balls encourage games and playful activity – this can also be seen with adult – sound or music encourages play and social interaction- adult focus group: board games as a way of bringing people together
  • Designsketching3D modelingsoftware & paper prototypinglow-fidelity prototype evaluation re-design
  • Jogo is a simple tangible step sequencer, a device designed to play back musical notationdevices that played rigid patterns of notes using a grid of (usually) 16 buttons, or steps, each step being 1/16th of a measure These patterns of notes are then chained together to form longer compositions. Step sequencers are monophonic by nature, although some are multitimbral, meaning they can control several different instruments but only play one note on each of those instruments.Tangible – the ballColourForm – platform, a gathering placeSensory feedback – sound Simplicity & ambiguity
  • Jogo is a simple tangible step sequencer, a a device designed to play back musical notationdevices that played rigid patterns of notes using a grid of (usually) 16 buttons, or steps, each step being 1/16th of a measure These patterns of notes are then chained together to form longer compositions. Step sequencers are monophonic by nature, although some are multitimbral, meaning they can control several different instruments but only play one note on each of those instruments.Tangible – the ballColourForm – platform, a gathering placeSensory feedback – sound Simplicity & ambiguity
  • ConferenceProposal for hardware version and further installations and observationMore researchThe development of new designs for free play
  • My personal motivation – decline, children missing out on what we had as children, adults needing a break from the stress and strain of everyday lifeNeed for play – for children and for adults – why its important for bothThe benefits of free open-ended playHuizinga, Stuart Brown, The Play Ethic, Lego Serious PlayPlays importance for childrenFor healthy child development – social skills, dexterityHuizingaIn his book, ‘Homo Ludens’ or ‘Man the Player’, he discusses play, presenting a study of the play element of culture, describing man the player and the importance of the “eternal play-element” of culture. Huizinga describes play as a function of the living that “is not susceptible ofexact definition either logically, biologically or aesthetically”. Play presents itself to us as “an interlude in our daily lives” and can be characterised as relaxation that is regularly recurring and that becomes an integral part of life. Play enhances life and can be seen as a necessity both for man as an individual, as a “life function” and for society because of its significance and its spiritual and social association. In his writing, Huizinga attempts to redefine and elevate the significance of play“The opposite of play is not work. It’s depression.”Brian Sutton-Smith“We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing.”George Bernard Shaw“Of all animals, humans are the biggest players of all”Stuart Brown, a medical doctor, psychiatrist, clinical researcher, and the founder of the National Institute for Play.“We are designed by nature and evolution to continue to play throughout life. Life-long play is central to our continued well-being, adaptation, and social cohesiveness.”Stuart Brown

jogo talk at 3Dcamp 2010 jogo talk at 3Dcamp 2010 Presentation Transcript

  • An Explorative Design for Free PlayEmma Creighton3DCamp, Tallaght Institute of Technology, 29th May 2010
  • free play for all
  • move away from play today…
  • …back to play of yesterday…
  • …inspired by technology of today…
  • …to encourage play that is
    free
    physical
    social
  • What has been done so far?
  • research
  • focus for design
  • design
  • jogo design
  • jogo design
  • jogo prototype
  • jogo play
    object
    visual
    exploratory
    sound
    game
  • What next?
  • some reading…
    Huizinga, J. Homo Ludens; a study of the play element in culture The Beacon Press, Boston, 1955
    Brown, S. Play, How it Shapes the Brain, Opens the Imagination, and Invigorates the Soul Penguin Group Inc., 2009
    Caillois, R. Man, Play and Games The Free Press of Glencoe, Inc., 1961
    Sutton-Smith, B., The Ambiguity of Play Harvard University Press, 2001
    Koster, R. A Theory of Fun for Game Design, Paraglyph Press, Arizona, 2005
    Froebel, F. The Education of Man New York: Sentry Press, 1974
    Wenner, M. The Serious Need for Play. Scientific American Mind, January 28, 2009
    Mandryk, R. L. and Inkpen, K. M. Supporting Free Play in Ubiquitous Computer Games, in Workshop on Ubiquitous Gaming UbiComp2001 (Atlanta, Georgia, USA, October 2001)
    Ginsburg, K R., The Importance of Play in Promoting Healthy Child Development and Maintaining Strong Parent-Child Bonds, in American Academy of Pediatrics, Springer Netherlands, 2006
    Baptiste, N., Adults need to play, too, in Early Childhood Education Journal 23(1) September, 33-35, 1995
    Ishii, H. Tangible bits: beyond pixels, in Proceedings of the 2nd international Conference on Tangible and Embedded interaction (Bonn, Germany, February, 2008)
    Hornecker, E. and Buur, J. Getting a grip on tangible interaction: a framework on physical space and social interaction, in Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (Montréal, Québec, Canada, April, 2006)
    Scientific American (2009) The Serious Need For Play [online] http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=the-serious-need-for-play [accessed 10th March 2009]
  • Thanks for your time!
    for more…
    w: www.emmacreighton.com
    e: hello@emmacreighton.com
    youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eePG6nhiZ9M
    vimeo: http://vimeo.com/12170754