BayChi - Go With the Flow = Onboarding and Virality
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BayChi - Go With the Flow = Onboarding and Virality

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BayChi - Go With the Flow = Onboarding and Virality BayChi - Go With the Flow = Onboarding and Virality Presentation Transcript

  • Onboarding & Lessons in Virality Go With The Flowerin malone :: BayChi December 2010 @emalone
  • flow:To move or run smoothly with unbrokencontinuity, as in the manner characteristicof a fluid.To exhibit a smooth or graceful continuity
  • The new user spiral Initial Exposure Viral Spread Onboarding Education Registration “The Sell” First Time User Experience The Passionate Initial User Exposure Second Time User Experience Education Third Time “The Sell” User ExperienceRegistration
  • The Usage Lifecycle diagram Joshua Porter Designing the Social Web bokardo.com
  • Engaging &Onboarding
  • Invite Homesteaders
  • Private Beta
  • Exclusivity
  • Private Beta What User wants to join a site that is currently in a private beta. Use When • Use this pattern when you want to allow people to sign up to join a private beta. • Use this pattern when you want to allow a small user list the opportunity to invite N new users to grow your site virally but in a controlled fashion. • Use this pattern to seed the community before it’s open for everyone • Use this pattern to allow a small user list to “kick the tires” and offer feedback post alpha but before opening to the public
  • Seeding
  • Potemkin Village
  • Instead of building a Potemkin Village,the architects of the relauncheddead.net site started with a judiciousfew groups and then let thecommunity spawn the rest.
  • FirstAwareness
  • Awareness News articles, facebook and twitter shares
  • Direct Invitation
  • Optimizing email invitationsGood: Uses name in From Good: Uses full name for better recognition Bad: From is a company, Bad: Erin who? could be ltered as SPAM
  • Optimizing email invitations Good: Uses name in From Good: Uses photos to show familiarity and that this is not from a stranger Good: Large call to action button
  • Receive Invitation What User receives an invitation from a friend or connection to join a site. Use When • Use when the experience is enhanced by having a network of connections. • Use when growth of the service is dependent on friends of friends. • Use when you want to supplement traditional user acquisition with user based referrals.
  • Send Invitation What User sends an invitation to a friend or group of friends to have them join in a site experience. Use When • Use when the user experience is enhanced by having a network of connections. • Use when growth of the service is dependent on friends of friends. • Use when you want to supplement traditional user acquisition with user based referrals. • Use when a user has participated in the site enough to have formed an opinion of the value, to then recommend it to a friend. • Don’t use right after registration when the user hasn’t actually used the site. When presenting the option to invite others, do so after enough interaction with your site that the user actually has something to recommend. •
  • Beware of spamming friends right after registration
  • Education“The Sell”
  • Homepage - try before you buy
  • Homepage with large call to action
  • Landing Page
  • Landing Page
  • Anatomy of a Landing Page Header Sign In Awesome feature highlight Call to Action could rotate or be different for different users Take a Tour Secondary cool feature Feature Grid Feature X X X X Feature X X X X Feature X X X X Feature X X X X
  • Feature X X X XAnatomy of a Landing Page Feature X X X X Feature X X X X Feature X X X X Main feature points Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Call to Action Footer
  • Registration
  • Alternatives to the large form Traditional reg form
  • Could be as simple as no sign up
  • Making it fun - DJ name
  • Keep it simple - 1. 2. 3. 1 2 3
  • Start the activities as part of the sign up process
  • Keep it simple - assign it to someone else
  • Sign Up / Registration What User wants to access their personalized information or an application that is stored on the host site. Use When • Use when personal data needs to be stored or when there is customization or personalization unique to the particular user. • Use when the site is a repository for user generated content and the submissions or les need to be identi ed and/or managed by the author. • Use when there are security or privacy concerns and the users data needs to be protected.
  • Authorize What The user wants to participate on a site by bringing their data and les over from another site. Use When • Use this pattern when features on your site are enhanced by accessing data and les from another site (Site A). • Use this pattern when user generated content or data on your site has the potential to enhance or enable other sites that your users may be participating in (Site B).
  • Onboarding
  • Ease in to the breadth. Offer one or two things to do
  • Build something as part of the sign up process
  • This list looks scary
  • The easiest activity is offered first
  • Suggest a list. One item is already crossed off.
  • Offer a tour of what to do first
  • 2nd visit: Reflect back and offer another activity
  • Welcome Area What A user registers for a new service and needs to have a sense of what can be done at the site and how to get started. Use When • Use this pattern when a new user rst accesses the site. • Use this pattern to acquaint the user with important or useful features.
  • Re-engagement
  • Introduce new features
  • Use social peer pressure - all the cool kids are here
  • Re-engagement What A user of your site hasn’t visited or participated in awhile. Use When • Use this pattern when you want to entice users back to your site. • Use this pattern when you want to inform users of new features.
  • Care andFeeding of the Passionate
  • Feature people & contributions prominently
  • Reward usage - compare stats with network
  • Badges, points & high reputation, reward use & quality Both system generated & community awarded
  • Badges, points & high reputation, reward use & quality
  • Learn from games photo by kurtxio
  • Named Levels What Participants in a community need some way to gauge their own personal development within that community: how far theyve progressed; how deeply theyve interacted with the community or its offerings. Use When • You want to enable consumers to discover and identify high-quality contributors. • The community is competitive, but not highly competitive. While Named Levels can have a competitive edge to them (my Wookie beats your Jawa!) they are perceived as less competitive than some other patterns (e.g., Ranking, Points, Numbered Levels) perhaps because they are less-empirical in nature. • You want to enable your users to track their individual growth in the community, and suggest ways that they may attain the next level in the hierarchy.
  • Numbered Levels What Participants in a community need some way to gauge their own personal development within that community: how far theyve progressed; how deeply theyve interacted with the community or its offerings. Additionally, these same measures can be used to compare members, to understand who has more or less experience in the community. Use When • You want to enable your users to track their individual growth in the community. • A large (or open-ended) number of levels are desirable. For example, World of Warcraft currently allows users to advance to Level 70. • You want to enable easy comparisons between users. (At a glance, Level 1 is more junior than Level 5.) • Youre trying to encourage a more-competitive community spirit.
  • Collectible Achievements What Some participants in communities respond to opportunities to earn or win awards that can be collected and displayed to other community members. Use When • You want to leverage users compulsive natures. They may seem silly or trivial, but Collectible Achievements can have an addictive quality when done right, and may compel your users to explore parts of your offering that otherwise might not appeal to them. • You want to encourage the community to try out all aspects of your offering. • There are speci c features or facets to your product offering that youd like to promote: for instance, if youd like to encourage more trades in a fantasy sports context, consider rewarding users with an achievement upon the completion of their 10th successful trade.
  • Points What In some communities, participants want a tangible measurement of their accomplishments for personal satisfaction and to make comparisons with other competitors. Use When • Use this pattern when the community is highly competitive, and the activities that users engage in are competitive in nature (e.g., player-vs-player contests, or coaching a fantasy football team). • Points are generally discouraged, except in cases where the fundamental, primary purpose of the community is competition, such as fantasy sports or games.
  • Leaderboard What In highly competitive communities using a ranking system, users may want to know who are the very best performers in a category or overall. Use When • The community is highly competitive, and the activities that users engage in are competitive in nature (e.g., player-vs-player contests, or coaching a fantasy football team.) • You want to enable player-to-player comparisons, or permit users to de nitively settle "Who is better?" arguments. • Dont use this pattern when the activities that users engage in are not competitive in nature (e.g., writing recipes, or sharing photos).
  • Share andshare alikeWith some viral patterns totallystolen from a presentation by Christina Wodtke
  • B=f(P,E) Behavior is a function of aPerson and his Environment
  • At hand
  • Tools for sharing are in prime real estate locations
  • Tools for sharing are in prime real estate locations
  • Tools for inviting are in prime real estate locations
  • First in list - incentives also give people a reason to share
  • Frictionless
  • The default errs on the side of the most viral option
  • The default errs on the side of the most viral option
  • Auto add - any member can add another
  • Respect the ethical dimensionRespect the ethical dimension
  • Impactful
  • Email this Network / Newsfeed vs. consumer broadcaster consumer consumer consumer broadcaster consumer consumer consumerOne to one consumer One to many
  • What’s your default?Email this Network / Newsfeed
  • Share This What User wants to share an object (pointer, media, or application) with one or more people. The application wants to be involved in the sharing in order to learn who is sharing what with whom, and how often. Use When • A user wants to directly send a pointer, invite someone to view something, or add a copy of or reference to something to a shared or public space they own or have access to. • Use when displaying content, resources, or applications on your site or elsewhere.
  • Connectedness
  • Carefully consider your method to jumpstart connections Let users walk other peoples network to nd people they know Make recommendations once you have a piece of data to pivot on, like work or schoolBuild on someoneelse’s social graph
  • Connections: Find PeopleWhatThe user wants to nd people she knows to connect and interact with on asite or social web service.Use When• Use when you want to help users nd people they care about who may already be using this site.• Use this pattern to expand user’s circles of connections beyond friends and family.• Use this pattern to encourage connections throughout the lifecycle of a person’s engagement.
  • Connections: Adding FriendsWhatA user has found people she knows on a social site and wants to addthem to her circle of connections.Use When• Use when user connections are a core part of the site’s experience.• Use when relationships will be con rmed providing a two-way reciprocal relationship.• Use when allowing following, where one user to follow another participant without reciprocity.• Use when ignoring a connection request is allowed.
  • A word about the Password Anti-Pattern DON’T
  • The Password Anti-PatternJust because everyone does itdoesn’t mean it’s right
  • Wrapup: The new user spiral Initial Exposure Viral Spread Onboarding Education Registration “The Sell” First Time User Experience The Passionate Initial User Exposure Second Time User Experience Education Third Time “The Sell” User ExperienceRegistration
  • Thankserin@emalone available now!erin@tangible-ux.com http://www.designingsocialinterfaces.com