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Neuromarketing Examples - Neuromarketing Overview
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Neuromarketing: The Future of Better Communications Neuromarketing Examples ...

Neuromarketing: The Future of Better Communications Neuromarketing Examples

Diana Lucaci, Founder & CEO
www.trueimpact.ca| True Impact | @dianalucaci
Canadian Chair, Neuromarketing Science and Business Association

Why Does it Matter?

Competitive Marketing landscape.
Impulse buying, confusion in marketplace.
Conventional marketing is disruptive.
Shift to digital, inbound marketing.

Marketing & Advertising need better tools.
De-clutter – Simplify messaging and visuals.
Differentiate – Sharp contrast against competition.
Build brands – Brands are shortcuts to reward.


Adapted from Gemma Calvert, Neurosense, Chair of Applied Neuroimaging, University of Warwick.

Neuromarketing fMRI Example
The ad campaign that created the greatest activity in a certain brain region, generated significantly more calls to a stop-smoking hotline. (Source: Sage Journals, 2012)

Neuromarketing EEG Example
Engaging multiple senses:
Communicates with the old brain, through the use of imagery.
Communicates with the neocortex, by making you wonder if the kid can move objects..
Stimulates the Senses, with epic soundtrack!
Make You Feel It. It’s simply a sweet story.

Neuromarketing Eye-Tracking Example

Decision Paralysis – Less is More
Grocery store displayed 24 varieties of jam, and offered samples.
60% of customers stopped to sample the jams
3% made a purchase
Next day, displayed only 6 jars.
40% customers stopped
30% made a purchase

Study by Sheena Iyengar, Professor at Columbia University.

Future of Neuromarketing
Deloitte predicts that the marketing and advertising industry will likely have brains on the brain for 2012. (Source: Deloitte TMT Predictions 2012)

About True Impact
True Impact provides Neuromarketing research and strategy, to solve Marketing and Advertising challenges.

Technologies: fMRI, EEG, eye-tracking

Learn more at www.trueimpact.ca

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  • There’s a huge difference between what science knows and what business does. Neuromarketing allows science to optimize business investments.
  • Think of all the myths science disproved – much like mythbusters.
  • Brand is a network of neurons in the brain
  • People don’t say what they feel.UCLA fMRI facility analyzed 3 anti-smoking ads by recording subject brain activity, as well as surveying the participants.Activity in one specific area of the brain predicted the effectiveness of the ads in the larger population, while the self-reports didn’t.The ad campaign that created the greatest activity in a certain brain region, generated significantly more calls to a stop-smoking hotline. (Source: Sage Journals, 2012)A new study published in Psychological Science brings us closer to that point: scientists using a UCLA fMRI facility analyzed anti-smoking ads by recording subject brain activity. They also asked subjects about the commercials and whether the ads were likely to change their behavior. The researchers found that activity in one specific area of the brain predicted the effectiveness of the ads in the larger population, while the self-reports didn’t.The methodology involved comparing brain activity in subjects who viewed ads from three campaigns to actual performance of the campaigns in increasing call volumes. The researchers focused on a subregion of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) but also compared activity in other brain regions for control purposes. They found that the ad campaign which created the greatest activity in the MPFC region generated significantly more calls to a stop-smoking hotline. “The approach described here is novel because it directly links neural responses with behavioral responses to the ads at the population level.” Simply put, the brain scan data correctly predicted how the ads would perform in the real world – not just how the subjects would behave, but the broader public audience. That’s a major milestone.
  • Communicates with the old brain – inspiring story through images. Communicates with the neocortex – Can the kid move objects?Stimulates the Senses – Effectively sound use.Make You Feel It – A sweet story evokes emotion.Make You Think It – Evokes logical thoughtby showing remote starter.
  • Decisions making is based on emotions, before logic.Technologies like fMRI and EEG measure levels of activation in decision-making regions of the brain.Most importantly, insights from neural metrics are applied to the Marketing or Advertising strategy, and used to generate recommendations for better customer understanding.
  • O’Connell cited social scientist Barry Schwartz, author of The Paradox of Choice: Why More is Less, who argues that the large number of choices available to consumers today can cause anxiety and bring about “decision paralysis.”For example, O’Connell said, a gourmet grocery introducing a new line of jam set up a table with 24 varieties of jam, and offered samples. While 60% of the customers stopped and tasted the jams, only 3% of them actually made purchases. The next day, the grocery set up the table with only six varieties, and while only 40% of the customers stopped, 30% of them actually bought.“Choosing which of 24 varieties to buy seemed to be too daunting a task,” said O’Connell. “Whereas selecting from six was a much more manageable choice.”
  • TIM VisionHuman values centered - Neuromarketing can benefit the world (non-profit, government)Growing knowledge of the brain – Neuromarketing research must be shared to advance global understanding of decision making in the brain.Objective analysis – In time, there’s need for peer-reviewed research.

Transcript

  • 1. Neuromarketing: The Future of Better Communications Neuromarketing Examples Diana Lucaci, Founder & CEO www.trueimpact.ca| True Impact | @dianalucaci Canadian Chair, Neuromarketing Science and Business Association
  • 2. Neuromarketing Explained Neuroscience Neuromarketing Marketing Neuromarketing is a new form of market research, that uses Neuroscience tools to measure the emotional impact of communication across all media, and translate the findings into actionable Marketing recommendations.2 www.trueimpact.ca
  • 3. One Way to Look at It…Neuromarketing Research Traditional Market Research– Measures Emotions as They Happen. – Measures Externalized Opinions. Brain imaging metrics, with no questions  People don’t say what they think. asked.  Time consuming exercise, prone to error. Quick turnaround and no chance of asking  Lack of actionable, corporate insights. the wrong question. Neuromarketing Strategy expertise for better corporate direction. Neuromarketing can also validate traditional market research.3 www.trueimpact.ca
  • 4. Why Does it Matter?Competitive Marketing landscape.  Impulse buying, confusion in marketplace.  Conventional marketing is disruptive.  Shift to digital, inbound marketing.Marketing & Advertising need better tools.  De-clutter – Simplify messaging and visuals.  Differentiate – Sharp contrast against competition.  Build brands – Brands are shortcuts to reward. Adapted from Gemma Calvert, Neurosense, Chair of Applied Neuroimaging, University of Warwick. 4 www.trueimpact.ca
  • 5. Neuromarketing fMRI Example  The ad campaign that created the greatest activity in a certain brain region, generated significantly more calls to a stop-smoking hotline. (Source: Sage Journals, 2012)5 www.trueimpact.ca
  • 6. Neuromarketing EEG Example Engaging multiple senses: 1. Communicates with the old brain, through the use of imagery. 2. Communicates with the neocortex, by making you wonder if the kid can move objects.. 3. Stimulates the Senses, with epic soundtrack! 4. Make You Feel It. It’s simply a sweet story. Customer understanding is key to successful communications.6 www.trueimpact.ca
  • 7. Neuromarketing Eye-Tracking Example 16 Heatmaps that reveal where people look.7 www.trueimpact.ca
  • 8. Decision Paralysis – Less is More Grocery store displayed 24 varieties of jam, and offered samples.  60% of customers stopped to sample the jams  3% made a purchase Next day, displayed only 6 jars.  40% customers stopped  30% made a purchaseStudy by Sheena Iyengar, Professor at Columbia University. 8 www.trueimpact.ca
  • 9. Future of Neuromarketing Deloitte predicts that the marketing and advertising industry will likely have brains on the brain for 2012. (Source: Deloitte TMT Predictions 2012)9 www.trueimpact.ca
  • 10. About True Impact Marketing challenges. Better For example, what do communications customers really want? campaigns! Neuromarketing Process Neuromarketing Neuromarketing research Strategy & measures evoked emotion, attention and Recommendations. memory. Data collection and analysis.10 www.trueimpact.ca
  • 11. About True Impact True Impact provides Neuromarketing research and strategy, to solve Marketing and Advertising challenges.  Technologies: fMRI, EEG, eye-tracking Learn more at www.trueimpact.ca True Impact Neuromarketing Research and Strategy Toronto, Canada 11 www.trueimpact.ca