SUBSIDIZED JOB PROGRAMSSUMMERYOUTHEMPLOYMENTPRO          GRAM              2012
Far and away the best prize that life has to offer is thechance to work hard at work         worth doing.    Theodore Roos...
PrefaceThis document statesthe road that has been walked on and the steps that have beenfollowed to bring us to this goal....
Ask not what your countrycan do for you; ask what youcan do for your   country.John Fitzgerald   Kennedy       3
YEAR 2012We are on a road, a road to provide the chance for personal development via a job.Acquiring new skills and work e...
The FoundationsDepartment of Family and Support Services BackgroundIn 2009, the Department of Family and Support Services ...
Summer Youth Employment ProgramOutlineGoals of the Summer Youth Employment ProgramThe goals of the Summer Youth Employment...
All youth will participate in a one-day skills orientation and additional training andrecreational activities.Youth partic...
Summer Youth Employment ProgramStipulationsProgram Funding SourcesThis initiative is administered by the Department of Fam...
Project Location and Accessibility to People with DisabilitiesRespondent must be committed to achieving full physical and ...
Respondentsto the Summer Youth Employment ProgramResponding OrganizationsGuidelines and Eligibility for RespondentsRespond...
Eligibility & Selection of ParticipantsDetermining Program EligibilityEligible youth must be Chicago residents between the...
Youth Soft Skill, Life Enrichment and Recreational ActivitiesRespondents will provide youth with information on program re...
The WorksiteWorksite DevelopmentRespondents will work with private companies, community-based agencies, not-for-profits, l...
Data Collection SystemData CollectionThe Department of Family and Support Services offers a unified data collection system...
SurveysEmployability Assessment and Youth & Employer SurveysRespondents will be responsible for administering the Employab...
Tracking of time and attendance will be entered by the respondent into the participanttracking system known as Cityspan.Pa...
Operating Budget, Administrative Costs and In-Kind Match RequirementsThe program states three very important issues regard...
18
YEAR 2011Last year there were no funds for Subsidized Youth Employment Programs.Federal funds were cut, and these sorts of...
20
YEAR 2010The year 2010 was a different year for many teens and youth.The year 2010 will remain engraved in their minds as ...
UNIVERSIDAD POPULAR Internal Confidential Report           Job Programs End Report                              Christophe...
AcknowledgmentsI would like to thank all of those involved in the progress of the Program DevelopmentDepartment.I would li...
Table of ContentsACKNOWLEDGMENTS ............................................................................................
SECTION FOUR: GETTING READY TO WORK .........................................................................................
Part Five: HEALIN’ ..........................................................................................................
PresentationThis report is an endeavor intended to give an overview of the outstanding job generated,as well as a testimon...
The   accomplishment     of   changing   another   human     being’s    life   for   the   better,acknowledging his/her ri...
means to sustain themselves and their families, easing the stress caused byunemployment.These programs also helped Univers...
The purpose of this partnership was to further Universidad Popular’s power, reach,impact and presence in the community. Th...
greater heights in its history, by reaching long time goals, strengthening its differentprograms and departments while cre...
See box for information on the economic impact this Government Program has had.                                           ...
Nevertheless, the wishes to advance in life, along with the skills that youth acquire aspart of the development of a job w...
This summer Universidad Popular found itself in an excellent position to keep serving itscommunity and to provide empowerm...
Education by the people                                 Education for the peopleChapter One: From Latin Center to Universi...
It has been more than 30 years now, that Universidad Popular has been bridging the gapbetween the Hispanic community and o...
language skills acquisition; legal aid; citizenshipassistance, civic education; anddevelopment and sponsorship of communit...
Due to such a standing, it shies away from traditional paradigms of community workcharacterized by giving programs to the ...
Innovation by definition will not be accepted at first. It takes repeated attempts, endless   demonstrations, and monotono...
But, how can it improve and grow in such a way that it becomes even stronger andinfluential?To reach its full potential Un...
In this case, Universidad Popular needed a new vision, a different way of looking atthings.This is where Project Developme...
The Project Development Department’s mission began early this year.The Project Development Director established meetings w...
Chapter Four: The ProgressAt times, for some progress may seem as an illusion, for several other people progressmay seem a...
Section Three: The Partnership-Serving Our Community Together              Individually, we are one drop. Together, we are...
Chapter One: The Federal/State Job ProgramsWe’ve spoken about the lack of jobs.Now let us talk about job creation.Job crea...
Chapter Two: Put Illinois To Work Program (PITW)Put Illinois to Work is a statewide program created by Illinois Governor P...
Part One: Invitation then Research and InvestigationSeek and you shall find said Jesus. Following His everlasting words pr...
Part Two: Enrolling as a WorksiteAccording    to   the     Put   Illinois   To   Work   Program   Official   Website,   wh...
Part Three: Synergizing the PITW Program into UP’s ProgramsThis partnership provided a mutually advantageous conjunction a...
Part Four: Searching for ApplicantsIt was thru ads that Universidad Popular searched for its future workforce.Universidad ...
Part Five: Interviews and HiringSeparate the wheat from the chaff.Not everyone can nor must be accepted.Universidad Popula...
Part Six: Information ProcessingAt the time the new employees were hired, Universidad Popular had to process their ownpape...
Part Seven: Inviting Others to Participate (Member 2 Member)Another of the Program Development Department’s innovative ide...
Part Eight: Processing the PaperworkOnce the person has been hired and trained.It’s time for the individual to receive the...
Part Nine: Adjustments and ContinuityLike any other mechanism these sort of programs need to be systematically reviewed to...
Chapter Three: Youth Employment for the Summer Program (YES)This is a program created by Illinois Governor Pat Quinn, the ...
Part One: Discovering the Need and Acting ProactivelyToday’s youth more than ever need to have the necessary opportunities...
Part Two: The Protest                        58
Part Three: Invitation then Research and InvestigationKnock and it shall be opened said Jesus. Following His everlasting w...
Part Four: Enrolling as a WorksiteThe requirements to enroll as a viable worksite are the following:Private, non-profit, a...
Part Five: Three: Synergizing the YES Program into UP’s ProgramsThe Youth Employment for the Summer gave Universidad Popul...
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Christopher LaFayelle, subsidized youth programs, Keep Illinois Working, jobs, job creation

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Summer youth employment programs

  1. 1. SUBSIDIZED JOB PROGRAMSSUMMERYOUTHEMPLOYMENTPRO GRAM 2012
  2. 2. Far and away the best prize that life has to offer is thechance to work hard at work worth doing. Theodore Roosevelt 1
  3. 3. PrefaceThis document statesthe road that has been walked on and the steps that have beenfollowed to bring us to this goal.This goal, once the land of dreams and aspirations,is now a reality.This goal, once far and away, is now at the grasp of our hands.The name of this goal is Subsidized Job Programs.Subsidized Job Programs bring mental relief and opportunities for economic andpersonal development. They keep the people that benefit from them away fromcommitting criminal activities, hunger, being unable to pay for school expenditures andhomelessness, among other socio-economic and health related concerns.The economic and personal benefits are enormous.These benefits enable the person to live better and strengthen self-esteem.They also give hope for the future andempower them to achieve their goals.This is the potential of one opportunity.This document centers itself in a byproduct of Subsidized Job Programs.It focuses on Subsidized Youth Employment Programs.Youth today need opportunities. They need a chance for success, a chance at…life.Subsidized Youth Employment Programs allow the targeted youth to save for college, payfor food and, in some cases, avoid homelessness.1Subsidized Youth Employment Programs provide new knowledge and skills; it can evenlaunch a career. They basically provide a new future for those that are benefitted bythem.Let us be all we can be.Sincerely, Christopher LaFayelle1 Alejandra Cancino. Another jobless summer for Illinois youth, The Chicago Tribune, May 2d 2011.Found online at http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2011-05-02/business/ct-biz-0503-teen-unemployment-20110502_1_summer-jobs-labor-market-studies-teen-unemployment 2
  4. 4. Ask not what your countrycan do for you; ask what youcan do for your country.John Fitzgerald Kennedy 3
  5. 5. YEAR 2012We are on a road, a road to provide the chance for personal development via a job.Acquiring new skills and work experience is paramount for the advancement of anyperson.New skills provide a door to new and exciting opportunities, these opportunities whichwould have remained unknown had it not been for those new skills.Employment is every person’s chance to make a difference in their world.Since many of today’s youth lack meaning and purpose in their lives, purpose is whatSubsidized Youth Employment Programs are all about.Last year there were no opportunities, this year the opportunities are back.One chance is all they need.Today’sSubsidized Youth Employment Programs provide the teens and youth that reallyneed a job and a platform, a platform from where they can see a clear, hopeful and realfuture, not only for themselves but for their families too.Much has been said but it is time for action now.Everybody knows that if you give somebody a chance and provide them with the skillsand preparation to succeed, then you’ll be preparing that person to reach new personal,educational, economical and moral heights.These Subsidized Youth Employment Programs have the necessary tools and structure totruly change lives forever.Be a part of this life-changing experience today.Be a witness of the road to success. 4
  6. 6. The FoundationsDepartment of Family and Support Services BackgroundIn 2009, the Department of Family and Support Services was created out of severalformer city departments and offices, including the Departments of Children and YouthServices, Human Services, and Senior Services, the Mayor’s Office of Domestic Violenceand parts of the Mayor’s Office of Workforce Development, and the Ten Year Plan to EndHomelessness, in order to provide more coordinated services for the city’s mostvulnerable citizens.Its mission is as follows:The Chicago Department of Family and Support Services is dedicated to supporting acontinuum of coordinated services to enhance the lives of Chicago residents, particularlythose most in need, from birth through the senior years. The department works to promotethe independence and well-being of neighborhoods by providing direct assistance andadministering resources to a network of community-based organizations, social serviceproviders and institutions.The Request for Proposals for a Summer Youth Employment ProgramThe Department of Family and Support Services has issued a request for proposalsseeking interested and qualified Respondents to provide training and job placementservices for its Summer Youth Employment Program.The program will serve youth participants ages 16-24 by providing summer employmentopportunities which allow for skill development leading to increased youth employability.This is an invitation for providers of this service to bid on the right to supply the trainingand job placement services for its Summer Youth Employment.This is a competitive process open to all entities: non-profit, for-profit, faith-based,private and public. 5
  7. 7. Summer Youth Employment ProgramOutlineGoals of the Summer Youth Employment ProgramThe goals of the Summer Youth Employment Program are to:1) Provide career-oriented summer employment placements for youth ages 16-24.2) Help young people develop transferable skills to increase employability through jobreadiness training.3)Provide youth with professional guidance, training, and supervision.4) Leverage theCity’s corporate allies, sister agencies and community-based organizationpartners to create meaningful and quality summer work experiences for Chicago’s youth.5) Provide youth with the opportunity to attend educational workshops, participate inhealth and fitness activities and other life enriching experiences. It is anticipated that theprogram will serve approximately 1,400 youth, and include thoughtful soft skills training,adequate supervision, work readiness training and structured work experiences in publicand nonprofit organizations as well as private sector businesses.Target Demographic and Purpose of the Summer Youth Employment ProgramThe target demographic isyouth ages 16-24 whom will develop work readiness andemployability skills.The program will provide opportunities to receive coaching and mentoring, gain careerexposure and develop employability skills through training coupled with real world workexperience during the six weeks of the summer. It will identify and secure structuredwork experiences in public and nonprofit organizations as well as private sectorbusinesses.Participation of Youth Enrolled in the Summer Youth Employment ProgramYouth enrolled in the Summer Youth Employment Program will participate in a minimumof 120 hours of combined soft skills development, training, recreation and positive workexperience during a six week period from July 9thto August 17th, 2012.The SummerYouth Employment Program will operate an anticipated 20 hours per weekwith youth ages 16–20 being engaged in a paid work experience for up to 12 hours perweek and the remaining eight hours spent in educational, soft skill and recreationalactivities. These youth 16-20 will receive a $600 stipend based on attendance.Older youth ages 21-24 will be hired as coaches to the program and work up to 20 hoursper week for the same six week period. They will receive a $1,000 stipend. 6
  8. 8. All youth will participate in a one-day skills orientation and additional training andrecreational activities.Youth participant’s stipends assume a minimum wage of $8.25 per hour.All youth enrolled in the Summer Youth Employment Program must have:a) Proof of Chicago residency,b) A valid social security card or ITIN;c) A valid Chicago Public School or State of Illinois ID card or driver’s license,d) Completed a One Summer Chicago or OSC+ application;e) And submit a signed consent form if under the age of 18. 7
  9. 9. Summer Youth Employment ProgramStipulationsProgram Funding SourcesThis initiative is administered by the Department of Family and Support Services throughcorporate funds of the City of Chicago. Consequently, all guidelines and requirements ofthe City of Chicago must be met.In addition to City of Chicago corporate funds, Federal and State funds may be used tosupport this program during the contract term contemplated under theRequest forProposals. Selected Respondents will be required to comply with all laws, regulations,policies and procedures imposed by funding sources.Additionally all Delegate Agencies must comply with the Single Audit Act if applicable.There will be a 10 % in-kind match requirement for this program. It is anticipated thatthis match will be used to leverage resources needed to provide the life enriching,education and recreational portion of the program. Additionally, administrative costs willbe capped at 10%.The Department of Family and Support Services currently anticipates funding up to 14organizations each capable of handling up to 105 youth.Funding is subject to theavailability of funds. Respondents should be aware that payment for services by the Citywill be made on a reimbursement basis.Respondents should not plan to receive their first payment until up to 60 days after theexecution of the delegate agreement.Term of ContractThe term of contract(s) executed under the Request for Proposals will run from June1st2012-May 31st2013 with the entirety of program dollars to be expended from June 1st–September 1st2012.The program will be in active operation from June 25th–August 24th2012.The Department of Family and Support Servicesmay extend this term for up to twoadditional periods, each not to exceed one year.This extension option is contingent upon successful performance of the program and theservices provided, and upon availability of funds.Should the initial Respondent’s contract be terminated or relinquished for any reason,the Department of Family and Support Services reserves the right to return to the pool ofRespondents generated from this Request for Proposals to select another qualifiedRespondent. 8
  10. 10. Project Location and Accessibility to People with DisabilitiesRespondent must be committed to achieving full physical and programmatic accessibilityas defined by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).Additionally, the Department of Family and Support Services reserves the right toguarantee the availability of all mandated services in each geographic region, andprovided in a linguistically and culturally appropriate manner. Scope of Summer Youth Employment Program ServicesProgram DesignThe Department of Family and Support Services’ Summer Youth Employment Program isdesigned to connect Chicago’s youth workforce, ages 16–24, with job skills and workplaceexperiences in community-based organizations, sister agencies and private sectorbusinesses.Operating BudgetsThis program is open to interested Respondents with operating budgets of $500,000.00or more who are able to leverage at least a 10 percent in-kind match to be used toprovide soft skills, educational and life enrichment activities.Administrativecosts will be capped at 10 percent.All respondents should be able to develop and deliver life enrichment and recreationalopportunities, place and manage the summer work experience program outlined belowfor no fewer than 105 youth.This program assumes a 1:15 youth coach to youth ratio.Services ProvidedThe Summer Youth Employment Program will provide up to eight hours of soft skills, lifeenrichment and recreational opportunities per week and also develop and coordinateworkplace experiences for its enrolled youth for up to 12 hours per week for the durationof the program.Youth stipends are capped at $600 for youth ages 16-20 for a maximum of six weeks oftraining and employment.Recruited worksites will provide youth with a safe, well defined experience that allowsyouth to gain valuable soft skills.Programmatic responsibility and expectations are more specifically outlined below. 9
  11. 11. Respondentsto the Summer Youth Employment ProgramResponding OrganizationsGuidelines and Eligibility for RespondentsRespondents should be aware that payment for services by the City will be made on areimbursement basis, due to the reimbursement nature of this program, respondentsmust demonstrate an operating budget of $500,000.00 or more, administrative costs forthis program will be capped at 10%. There is also a 10% in-kind match requirement.Eligible RespondentsThis is a competitive process open to all entities: non-profit, for-profit, faith-based,private and public.Ideal Respondents should be able to demonstrate specific knowledge and experience inyouth development and employment practices, work experience development andplacement, youth mentoring in the specific neighborhoods, communities and schoolswhose youth they propose serving.Ideal Respondents will also be asked to coordinate and provide a life enrichmentcomponent of the program. This component can consist of educational and soft skillstraining, fitness and team building activities or any other appropriate life enriching, ageappropriate activities.Due to the reimbursement nature of this program, respondents must demonstrate anoperating budget of $500,000 or more.Respondents whose existing contracts with Department of Family and Support Servicesare not in good standing will not be considered for a contract.Agencies not eligible include those that:1) Have had a City contract terminated for default, and/or2) Are currently debarred and/or3) Have been issued a final determination by a City, State or Federal Agency for performance of a criminal act, abridgement of Human Rights or illegal/fraudulent practices. 10
  12. 12. Eligibility & Selection of ParticipantsDetermining Program EligibilityEligible youth must be Chicago residents between the ages of 16 and 24 that haveapplied online using the City of Chicago, One Summer Chicago application and haveobtained parental/guardian consent if under the age of 18.All youth enrolled in the Summer Youth Employment Program must have:1) Proof of Chicago residency,2) A valid social security card or ITIN;3) A valid Chicago Public School or State of Illinois ID card or driver’s license,4) Completed a One Summer Chicago or OSC+ application; and5) Submit a signed consent form if under the age of 18.Youth Application Selection ProcessIn 2012, Department of Family and Support Services intends to move towardsrandomization of selected applicants with approximately 60% of youth selected for theprogram being randomly identified and the remaining 40% identified via respondentreferral. All potential participants must have completed the on-line application to beconsidered for the participation.Respondents will administer the Employability Assessment to all youth participants, ages16–24. The Employability Assessment is an observed assessment of 16 core 21stcenturycollege and career skills.The Department of Family and Support Services will train respondents on how toadminister the Employability Assessment and report outcomes and scoring in theCityspan system.Please refer to Attachment A for a copy of the Employability Assessment.This assessment will be used after youth have been enrolled in the program to gatherbaseline information.Respondents will develop and implement an outreach and recruitment plan toidentifyand enroll eligible youth for the program.The Department of Family and Support Services,will randomly select potential youthparticipants through the One Summer Chicago application database, and providerespondents with a list of eligible participants to contact, verify eligibility and enroll inthe Summer Youth Employment Program. 11
  13. 13. Youth Soft Skill, Life Enrichment and Recreational ActivitiesRespondents will provide youth with information on program requirements andexpectations, through an orientation and in writing to each enrolled participant.Respondents will also provide a one-day work readiness skills training (6-8 hours) to allparticipating youth during the first week.In addition, each subsequent week will feature up to eight (8) hours of planned soft skills,life enrichment and recreational activities.Activities may include, but are not limited to:1) Work ethic and character,2) Problem solving,3) Computer and financial literacy,4) Interviewing techniques,5) Résumé preparation and interpersonal skills development.During the remaining twelve (12) hours of the time per week youth should be engaged ina work experience that relates to their interests, relevant prior experiences, andstrengths.Youth hired as coaches to the program must be at least 21 years of age and qualified andable to make work-site visits and provide support and guidance to youth placed inworksites. 12
  14. 14. The WorksiteWorksite DevelopmentRespondents will work with private companies, community-based agencies, not-for-profits, local businesses, faith-based communities, etc. to create summer workexperiences.Respondents’ responsibilities regarding this area will include:1) Identifying work sites and number of available placements,2) Verifying and approving work experience activities submitted by worksites,3) Hosting worksite liaison orientations & training and4) Providing on-going program monitoring at such worksites.The Department of Family and Support Services will provide a worksite application formto awarded respondents. Respondents will also be responsible for developing selectioncriteria and matching youth to appropriate workplace experiences.Workplace experiences for youth 16–20 should be a maximum of 12 hour per week andlast at least six weeks in their duration. Youth ages 16–20 receive stipend of $600 for sixweeks.Worksite Monitoring-Adult SupervisionEvery program will need to designate a youth coach for worksites with 15 or more youthemployees.Youth coaches will provide program, administrative and youth supports including dailysupervision of and ongoing feedback to youth participants.In addition, coaches will be responsible for conducting site visits, securing timesheetsand administering the Employability Assessment to youth participants.Additionally, coaches will need to be supervised by a designated employee of theRespondent agency with a ratio not to exceed one (1) designated employee to seven youthcoaches.The target demographic for these jobs will be youth ages 21–24.Coaches will be paid a stipend of $1,000 for six weeks.Worksite MatchingRespondents will assist youth in identifying their career interests and match youth to anappropriate work experience based on theirgoals, interests and worksite job needs. 13
  15. 15. Data Collection SystemData CollectionThe Department of Family and Support Services offers a unified data collection systemthat captures information on opportunities, employers and youth.Selected applicants will be required to use this system, known as Cityspan, to maintainparticipant time and attendance records.The Department of Family and Support Services will offer agencies training prior toprogram start and ongoing technical support.Payroll SystemRespondents must have the capacity to operate a payroll and timekeeping system thatassures that all youth are paid on time according to an established schedule.Youth should be paid twice and receive half their stipend mid-way through the programand the remaining half at the end of the program.Programs will last six weeks.This payroll system can be operated directly by a funded Respondent or via a FiscalAgent named at the time of application.This Fiscal Agency may include payroll processing companies.It is anticipated that programs will operate on a reimbursement basis; therefore it isimportant that all applicants have adequate and available resources to meet program andpayroll expenditures on a weekly basis.In addition to managing payroll responsibilities, all respondents must maintain generalliability insurance and Workman’s Compensation coverage for all youth employedthrough the program.At the end of the calendar year, the payroll administrator must send tax forms directly toprogram participants and respond to inquiries or issues during the program period. 14
  16. 16. SurveysEmployability Assessment and Youth & Employer SurveysRespondents will be responsible for administering the Employability Assessment to allyouth participants, ages 16–24.The Employability Assessment is an observed assessment of 16 core 21stcentury collegeand career skills.Department of Family and Support Services will trainrespondents on how to administerthe Employability Assessment and report outcomes 10 and scoring in the Cityspansystem.Please refer to Attachment A for a copy of the Employability Assessment.This assessment tool should be administered once at the beginning of the program andonce at the end of the program.Additionally, the Department of Family and Support Services will provide respondentswith post-program surveys for distribution to employers.Respondents will be responsible for distributing surveys to and collecting from employersand making them available to the Department of Family and Support Services.Record KeepingSuccessful respondents will be expected to maintain complete and accurate records onprogram participants.Individual case files shall be kept for each program participant and will include, but isnot limited to:1) Program eligibility documentation,2) Employability assessment scorecard,3) Evidence of outcomes,4) Referrals made and5) Documentation of support services provided by the Respondent (e.g. clothing, transportation, etc.) to ensure retention in the program.In addition, successful respondents will maintain comprehensive information on worksiteplacements that will include, but is not limited to:1) Work site agreements and2) Documentation of participant hours spent at the work site. 15
  17. 17. Tracking of time and attendance will be entered by the respondent into the participanttracking system known as Cityspan.Participants will be paid only for the time that can be verified through Cityspantimesheets and attendance records.ReportingAwarded respondents will also complete a Department of Family and Support Servicesclose out reporting form.The close out report will summarize the contractor/service provider’s activities,accomplishments and youth experiences including, but not limited to:1) Number of youth served,2) Aggregate hours worked,3) The sites at which work was performed,4) Type of work completed at each site,5) Individual youth information (total hours worked, completion status,6) Reason for not completing) evaluations by participants of their experience and7) Reason for not completing evaluations by supervisors of the youth.Successful respondents will be expected to maintain complete fiscal and accountingrecords and report financial information to the Department of Family and SupportServices on the forms designated and at the intervals specified by the Department.These reports must be submitted by the deadlines established by the Department ofFamily and Support Services.Failure to comply with these reporting requirements may be cause for termination of thecontract, or for the delay or withholding of payment.Performance Outcome MeasuresThe outcomes of the Summer Youth Employment Programinclude:1) Of the youth placed, 90% will complete the full six weeks of the subsidized work experience.2) 80% of enrolled youth will successfully complete the total planned program of 120 hours.3) Youth that participated in the Employability Assessment, 80% will meet standards for the following: Work Ethic/Character, Problem Solving, andInterpersonal Skills. 16
  18. 18. Operating Budget, Administrative Costs and In-Kind Match RequirementsThe program states three very important issues regarding the operational budget.First of all, respondents must demonstrate an operating budget of a minimum of$500,000.00 or more.The administrative costs for the program will be capped at 10% of the total of theoperating budget. There is also a 10% in-kind match requirement.This in-kind cost share is donated or loaned; by a third party that is a partner investor tothe applicant which the applicant is using as part of their state granting agenciesmatch.In general, the value of in-kind services or property used to fulfill a state grantingagencies match will be the fair market value of the services or property. Thus, the valueis determined by the cost of obtaining such services or property if they had not beendonated, or of obtaining such services or property for the period of the loan.The applicant must document the in-kind services or property used to fulfill the stategranting agencies match and give a dollar amount for all in-kind contributions.If the respondent (applicant) demonstrates an operating budget of $2,000,000.00, thismeans that it will cost $200,000.00 (10% of the operating budget) in administrative coststo run the program for the term specified in the Request for Proposals.The partner investor can be sure of a secured state repayment of his investment, which isthe 10% in-kind match requirement ($200,000.00).Notice that even though Youth participant’s stipends assume a minimum wage of $8.25per hour, thissize of an operating budget,may allowthis one respondent (applicant)tobenefit 800 youth whommay receive $2,000.00 each over a period of 6-8 weeks, to workin a subsidized employment program such as the Summer Youth Employment Program. 17
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  20. 20. YEAR 2011Last year there were no funds for Subsidized Youth Employment Programs.Federal funds were cut, and these sorts of programs were unavailable, hence youthunemployment is at a record high. It is a sad fact that most of theyouth that benefit fromthese programs live in under-privileged areas, low-income communities.Without Subsidized Youth Employment Programs, these youth need a job to commute toschool, they even run therisk of dropping out of school; some others might even end upliving in homeless shelters and needing a job to commute to school, others need the jobtobuy food to support their family.Without opportunities, these teens and youth, are stuck in the same situation as theirparents have been.These Chicago teenagers are also in danger, danger of losing their friends to violence andof resorting to illegal ways to get money, such as selling drugs.Lack of opportunities for youth create a vicious cycle formed by unemployment, lack ofeducation, lack of health, violence, poverty and psychological unrest.In 2011, the youth that would have benefitted from a Subsidized Youth EmploymentPrograms had nowhere to turn. The door was shut in their face, with little to no realexplanation, just political bureaucracy.Human needs understand not bureaucracy; bureaucracy understands nothing about reallife struggles.In 2011, there were no career development opportunities throughout thecity.The youth of the community felt a ubiquitous sense of powerlessness and hopelessnessrush within them.These opportunities would have served to empower young people with the knowledge,experience, and confidence they need to achieve their fullest potential. 19
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  22. 22. YEAR 2010The year 2010 was a different year for many teens and youth.The year 2010 will remain engraved in their minds as the summer of opportunity, theyear that set them on the road to empowerment.They obtained the necessary tools to achieve confidence, which derived on acquisition ofknowledge, and gaining experience, all this allowed them to reach their potential.This is the work done by Universidad Popular’s Department of Program Development,which teamed up with Government Sponsored Programs, Federal/State Job Programssuch as Put Illinois to Work and Youth Employment for the Summer.This is their story. 21
  23. 23. UNIVERSIDAD POPULAR Internal Confidential Report Job Programs End Report Christopher Lafayette Director Program Development Department 25/10/2010Report on the development of the Federal/State Job Programs in Universidad Popular, ana- lyzing their implementation, progress and their outcome and consequences 22
  24. 24. AcknowledgmentsI would like to thank all of those involved in the progress of the Program DevelopmentDepartment.I would like to thank all of those involved in the history, development, progress, past andpresent of Universidad Popular.I would like to thank you for giving me theopportunity to be a part of this greatCommunity Based Organization.I would like to thank you for giving me the possibility to make a difference, a long lastingdifference.I’m thankful for all of those of you who believe.I’m thankful for all of those of you who believe in true progress and true change.I’m thankful for all of those of you who believe in the power of community, to all of thoseof you who believe in the history of our great land.I’m thankful for all of those of you who still believe in the American Dream, who stillbelieve in the land of the free and the home of the brave.I’m thankful for all of those of you who care.I’m thankful for all of those of you who care for their city, who care for their State, whocare for their Homeland.I’m thankful for all of those of you who care for their neighbor, who care for theirchildren’s progress, who care for their community’s safety, development andimprovement.To you, present here, thank you.To you, reading this, thank you.To you, who are ready to change your world, thank you.To you, who knows that the road is narrow and the workers few, thank you.To you, who are strong, determined, faithful and one of those few workers, thank you.Sincerely, Christopher Lafayette 23
  25. 25. Table of ContentsACKNOWLEDGMENTS ................................................................................................................................................................ 23TABLE OF CONTENTS .................................................................................................................................................................. 24PRESENTATION .......................................................................................................................................................................... 27PROLOGUE ................................................................................................................................................................................. 28PUT ILLINOIS TO WORK PROGRAM (PITW) EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ............................................................................................ 29YOUTH EMPLOYMENT FOR THE SUMMER PROGRAM (YES) EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ................................................................... 32SECTION ONE: UNIVERSIDAD POPULAR’S ORGANIZATIONAL DESCRIPTION ............................................................................... 34 CHAPTER ONE: FROM LATIN CENTER TO UNIVERSIDAD POPULAR ................................................................................................................. 35 CHAPTER TWO: UNIVERSIDAD POPULAR’S PRESENT .................................................................................................................................. 36 CHAPTER THREE: UNIVERSIDAD POPULAR’S MISSION ................................................................................................................................ 37SECTION TWO: THE MISSING LINK ............................................................................................................................................. 38 CHAPTER ONE: PROJECT DEVELOPMENT ................................................................................................................................................. 39 CHAPTER TWO: THE VISION .................................................................................................................................................................. 40 CHAPTER THREE: THE MISSION ............................................................................................................................................................. 41 CHAPTER FOUR: THE PROGRESS ............................................................................................................................................................ 43SECTION THREE: THE PARTNERSHIP-SERVING OUR COMMUNITY TOGETHER ............................................................................ 44 CHAPTER ONE: THE FEDERAL/STATE JOB PROGRAMS ................................................................................................................................ 45 CHAPTER TWO: PUT ILLINOIS TO WORK PROGRAM (PITW) ....................................................................................................................... 46 Part One: Invitation then Research and Investigation ............................................................................................................... 47 Part Two: Enrolling as a Worksite .............................................................................................................................................. 48 Part Three: Synergizing the PITW Program into UP’s Programs ................................................................................................ 49 Part Four: Searching for Applicants ........................................................................................................................................... 50 Part Five: Interviews and Hiring ................................................................................................................................................. 51 Part Six: Information Processing ................................................................................................................................................ 52 Part Seven: Inviting Others to Participate (Member 2 Member) ............................................................................................... 53 Part Eight: Processing the Paperwork ....................................................................................................................................... 54 Part Nine: Adjustments and Continuity ..................................................................................................................................... 55 CHAPTER THREE: YOUTH EMPLOYMENT FOR THE SUMMER PROGRAM (YES) ................................................................................................. 56 Part One: Discovering the Need and Acting Proactively ............................................................................................................ 57 Part Two: The Protest ................................................................................................................................................................ 58 Part Three: Invitation then Research and Investigation ........................................................................................................... 59 Part Four: Enrolling as a Worksite ............................................................................................................................................. 60 Part Five: Three: Synergizing the YES Program into UP’s Programs .......................................................................................... 61 Part Six: Searching for Applicants .............................................................................................................................................. 62 Part Seven: Interviews and Hiring .............................................................................................................................................. 63 Part Eight: Information Processing ............................................................................................................................................ 64 Part Nine: Inviting others to Participate (Member 2 Member) ................................................................................................. 65 Part Ten: Processing the Paperwork .......................................................................................................................................... 66 Part Eleven: Adjustments and Continuity Paperwork Change #2 .............................................................................................. 67 Part Twelve: Paperwork Change #3 ........................................................................................................................................... 68 24
  26. 26. SECTION FOUR: GETTING READY TO WORK ............................................................................................................................... 69 CHAPTER ONE: SHARING SOCIAL CONSCIOUSNESS..................................................................................................................................... 70 CHAPTER TWO: MULTI-VOCATIONAL TRAININGS ...................................................................................................................................... 71 CHAPTER THREE: CATEGORIZATION OF THE DIFFERENT JOBS........................................................................................................................ 72 CHAPTER FOUR: DISTRIBUTION OF THE WORKFORCE ................................................................................................................................. 73 CHAPTER FIVE: ADJUSTMENTS AND CONTINUITY – CHANGING JOBS ............................................................................................................. 74SECTION FIVE: THE WIDE WORLD OF WORKSITES ...................................................................................................................... 75 CHAPTER ONE: ONE TO ONE OUTREACH TO SPREAD THE WORD ................................................................................................................. 76 CHAPTER TWO: CONVINCE THE BUSINESSES OF THE BENEFITS ..................................................................................................................... 77 CHAPTER THREE: PROCESSING FORMAL AND INFORMAL WORKSITES ............................................................................................................ 78 CHAPTER FOUR: CONSTANT AVAILABILITY OF TRANSPARENT INFORMATION ................................................................................................... 79 CHAPTER FIVE: SUPPORTING LEGAL DOCUMENTATION................................................................................................................................ 80SECTION SIX: PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT IN ACTION .................................................................................................................. 81 CHAPTER ONE: PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT’S PROGRAMS ............................................................................................................................ 82 Part One: Public Relations ......................................................................................................................................................... 83 Part Two: Social Networking ..................................................................................................................................................... 84 Part Three: Web Design ............................................................................................................................................................. 85 Part Four: Photography ............................................................................................................................................................. 86 Part Five: Writers: ...................................................................................................................................................................... 87 Part Six: Media Outreach ........................................................................................................................................................... 88 Part Seven: Fundraising ............................................................................................................................................................. 89 Part Eight: Strategic Alliances and Partnerships ....................................................................................................................... 90 Part Nine: Testimonials .............................................................................................................................................................. 91 Part Ten: Administration ........................................................................................................................................................... 92 Part Eleven: Database Entry and Administration ...................................................................................................................... 93 Part Twelve: Research & Investigation ...................................................................................................................................... 94 Part Thirteen: Research & Development ................................................................................................................................... 95 Part Fourteen: Grant Research .................................................................................................................................................. 96 Part Fifteen: Grant Writing ........................................................................................................................................................ 97 Part Sixteen: UP Somos Arte (Art Club) ..................................................................................................................................... 98 CHAPTER TWO: PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT’S PILOT PROGRAMS ................................................................................................................... 99 Part One: In The Community – School Clubs ............................................................................................................................ 100 Part Two: UPrint ...................................................................................................................................................................... 101 Part Three: Parking Lot ............................................................................................................................................................ 102 Part Four: FEMA Disaster Recovery Center .............................................................................................................................. 103 Part Five: Voter Registration.................................................................................................................................................... 104 Part Six: Takin’ It To The Streets .............................................................................................................................................. 105 Part Seven: Beautify UP ........................................................................................................................................................... 106 Part Eight: Hispanic Literacy Council ....................................................................................................................................... 107 Part Nine: SW Chicago-Mexican Coalition ............................................................................................................................... 108 Part Ten: UP Ambassadors ...................................................................................................................................................... 109 Part Eleven: High School UPrising ............................................................................................................................................ 110 Part Twelve: UP College Preparation ....................................................................................................................................... 111 CHAPTER THREE: UNIVERSIDAD POPULAR’S PROGRAMS ........................................................................................................................... 112 Part One: FILIPRO .................................................................................................................................................................... 113 Part Two: DILIPRO.................................................................................................................................................................... 114 Part Three: UPrising ................................................................................................................................................................. 115 Part Four: LETOS ...................................................................................................................................................................... 116 25
  27. 27. Part Five: HEALIN’ .................................................................................................................................................................... 117 Part Six: PRO SE LEGAL CLINIC ................................................................................................................................................. 118 Part Seven: FLT Chicago Lawn ................................................................................................................................................. 119 Part Eight: Special Events- La Feria Del Mole .......................................................................................................................... 120SECTION SEVEN: SOCIAL IMPACT ............................................................................................................................................. 121 CHAPTER ONE: THE PLAN................................................................................................................................................................... 122 CHAPTER TWO: PROJECTS ACCOMPLISHED ............................................................................................................................................ 123 CHAPTER THREE: THE FOUNDATION FOR THE FUTURE .............................................................................................................................. 124SECTION EIGHT: ECONOMIC IMPACT ....................................................................................................................................... 125 CHAPTER ONE: THE PLAN................................................................................................................................................................... 127 CHAPTER TWO: THE RESULTS .............................................................................................................................................................. 129 CHAPTER THREE: CONTINUING INTO THE FUTURE ................................................................................................................................... 130SECTION NINE: TESTIMONIALS ................................................................................................................................................. 131 CHAPTER ONE: TESTIMONIAL LETTERS FROM WORKSITES ......................................................................................................................... 132 CHAPTER TWO: TESTIMONIAL LETTERS FROM PARTICIPANTS ..................................................................................................................... 133 CHAPTER THREE: TESTIMONIAL LETTERS FROM GROUP LEADERS ................................................................................................................ 134SECTION TEN: FINAL NOTES ..................................................................................................................................................... 135 CHAPTER ONE: NOT EXACTLY AS I THOUGHT… ...................................................................................................................................... 136 CHAPTER TWO: BUT… ....................................................................................................................................................................... 137 CHAPTER THREE: RECOGNITIONS ......................................................................................................................................................... 138EPILOGUE ................................................................................................................................................................................. 139ABOUT THE AUTHOR................................................................................................................................................................ 140 26
  28. 28. PresentationThis report is an endeavor intended to give an overview of the outstanding job generated,as well as a testimonial of all of Universidad Popular’s faithful staff and Board ofDirectors.Their job and will to surpass difficulties gives testimony of the strength of character anddetermination found deep in our souls.This determination, along with the care that each and every participant in this projectshowed towards theobjectives we all had, led this ship to a safe harbor.All of the work, desire, strength and intelligence poured into this project, so it would bearthe mark of approval of success, made it a noteworthy effort while changing ourperspective of what real accomplishment is. 27
  29. 29. The accomplishment of changing another human being’s life for the better,acknowledging his/her right to pursue happiness by equipping the individual with theopportunities that lead to a better future are almost indescribable.I am honored to present this report as witness, faithful and true, clear and real, of thechanges and improvements that it has brought to the lives of many individuals andfamilies of our community.We’ve seen the patent and accurate development of an individual’s life, brought tofruition by the fact of obtaining and holding a job.We were a part of this success, for we saw men, women and youth gain, not onlyexperience, but a sense of self-worth.Their jobs had a direct economic effect on their lives, persons and families.The success of the program also has an effect on us. It changed us; it showed us thatwhen we work as a team, united, together, in one mind, in a unanimous effort, we canachieve real accomplishments.It also had a positive, lasting social effect on our city, providing it with more skilled,productive and happy individuals.PrologueCrisis. Depression. Bankruptcy. Rescue. Bailout. Job Loss. Unemployment.Catastrophe stroke the country when the economy fell and got us all in an economicdownturn, a depression, a big mess.What the normal folks only knew was that their life had just become harder and thattheir livelihood was threatened. Many lost their jobs and with it their dreams.The loss of a job is very devastating, especially in uncertain times.That’s one of the reasons why Universidad Popular teamed with the Federal/State JobPrograms such as Put Illinois To Work and Youth Employment for the Summer.These programs rescued many people and put in their hands the opportunity, onceagain, to feel the unique power that having a jobbestows. It also put in their hands the 28
  30. 30. means to sustain themselves and their families, easing the stress caused byunemployment.These programs also helped Universidad Popular in the advancement of its purpose. Itgave us the opportunity to strengthen our departments and our staff.These programs gave Universidad Popular the opportunity to make a difference, adifference which could not have been possible without the participants in theseGovernment Programs.Certainly, the economy is not as healthy as we would like it to be, but with the assistanceof Government Sponsored Programs, the possibility of redeeming someone’s economicfuture becomes a shining reality.We celebrate the chance given and the opportunity taken.We present encouraging results.We present a brighter tomorrow.All in the understanding that we, as part of society need to keep being vigilant andcaring, utilizing our gifts and abilities to support our society.This is the story.Put Illinois To Work Program (PITW) Executive SummaryBy: Christopher Lafayette, Director of the Program Development Department.Introduction.Economic recovery and job production are two of the Government’s top goals.With this in mind, Universidad Popular teamed with the State Government to be a part ofthe change that this program would cause in many people’s lives.Offering and giving a job opportunity to someone that looks for it and that wishes toadvance in his life, with the skills that he acquires as part of the development of his job isfulfilling.And it’s just as fulfilling to know that their job helps Universidad Popular advance in itsgoals. 29
  31. 31. The purpose of this partnership was to further Universidad Popular’s power, reach,impact and presence in the community. This program provided Universidad Popular withmuch needed help for the developing and functioning of its own programs.The results we obtained would not have been possible without the support of theProgram Development Department’s staff, and their awe inspiring efforts, nor without thesupport of the staff of the rest of Universidad Popular Departments, and their hard work.I express my sincere appreciation to all of them.And of course, I manifest my special gratitude to the Board of Directors of UniversidadPopular, for their belief in the project.Development.The goal of the Put Illinois To Work Government Program is to provide work to Americansin need via the Stimulus Package.The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 commonly referred to as theStimulus or The Recovery Act provides spending dollars for job creation around thenation.What Universidad Popular basically did in this partnership was to investigate the needsof the community, enroll as a worksite so there would be equally correspondentteamwork between the Government’s Program and Universidad Popular.The next step would be to search for applicants and interview them, so the most fittingfor Universidad Popular’s objectives would be hired.Once the workforce’s paperwork had been processed, it was time to train them.After the workforce knew what they would do, it was time to distribute them in thevarious departments that they chose, so their strengths would be betteremployed.Afterwards, we made some adjustments to let everything flow as we had expected.This summer Universidad Popular found itself in an excellent position to keep serving itscommunity and to provide empowerment to many of the community’s residents. Thispartnership proved to be a win-win effort.While the Government Program provided the people with a job, it was the enthusiasmand will of these individuals on the other end, which helped Universidad Popular achieve 30
  32. 32. greater heights in its history, by reaching long time goals, strengthening its differentprograms and departments while creating other pilot programs.ConsequencesThrough Put Illinois to Work, 26,000 unemployed and underemployed Illinois residentswere connected to subsidized employment opportunities.While the Federal government has not extended this Stimulus Work Relief Program, theState Government has taken actions ensuring that funds are available to maintain thePut Illinois to Work program for two months. These two months will serve as a bridge toallow time for Federal Action.The two month extension will allow those currently enrolled in Put Illinois to Work toremain in their placements and to continue to gain valuable work experience whileearning money to support themselves and their families.The city of Chicago and Universidad Popular need this Government Program active.In just four months we generated a great economic impact in our community.We were able to find employment for over 400 young men and women that have the willto work, and the desire to attain personal growth.Universidad Popular has been able to offer this employment due to the strong passion ofmany dedicated team members and the encouragement derived from the development ofa strong relationship with the city of Chicago (DFSS) and the State of Illinois (DHS). Also,UP was able to find gainful employment for hundreds of adults.We conclude by stating that this Government Program is a much needed asset in today’seconomic and social climate.Universidad Popular can create a stronger and lasting effect on more families andindividuals who take advantage of this Program. 31
  33. 33. See box for information on the economic impact this Government Program has had. Direct economic impact to UP’s community May - October 2010 38 PITW at UP $182,400.00 100 PITW outside $800,000.00 19 CSBG at UP $50,160.00 7 CSBG outside UP $18,480.00 300 YES $480,000.00 260 Yes Stipend $104,000.00See box for information on theeconomic impact this Total $1,635,040.00Government Program has had.Youth Employment for the Summer Program (YES) Executive SummaryBy: Christopher Lafayette, Director of the Program Development Department.Introduction.Economic recovery and job production are two of the Government’s top goals.With this in mind, Universidad Popular teamed with the State Government to be a part ofthe change that this program would cause in many people’s lives.Offering and giving a job opportunity to someone that looks for it (maybe for the firsttime) is not easy.Inexperience for someone young is usually a disadvantage instead of an asset. 32
  34. 34. Nevertheless, the wishes to advance in life, along with the skills that youth acquire aspart of the development of a job will be a fulfilling counterpart to the previous difficulties.And it’s just as fulfilling to know that employed youth help Universidad Popular advancein its goals.The purpose of this partnership was to further Universidad Popular’s power, reach,impact and presence in the community. This program provided Universidad Popular withmuch needed help for the developing and functioning of its own programs.The results we obtained would not have been possible without the support of theProgram Development Department’s staff, and their awe inspiring efforts, nor without thesupport of the staff of the rest of Universidad Popular Departments, and their hard work.I express my sincere appreciation to all of them.And of course, I manifest my special gratitude to the Board of Directors of UniversidadPopular, for their belief in the project.Development.The goal of the Youth Employment for the Summer Government Program is to providework to American youth via the Stimulus Package.The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 commonly referred to as theStimulus or The Recovery Act provides spending dollars for job creation around thenation.What Universidad Popular basically did in this partnership was to investigate the needsof the community, enroll as a worksite so there would be equally correspondentteamwork between the Government’s Program and Universidad Popular.The next step would be to search for applicants and interview them, so the most fittingfor Universidad Popular’s objectives would be hired.Once the workforce’s paperwork had been processed, it was time to train them.After the workforce knew what they would do, it was time to distribute them in thevarious departments that they chose, so their strengths would be betteremployed.Afterwards, we made some adjustments to let everything flow as we had expected. 33
  35. 35. This summer Universidad Popular found itself in an excellent position to keep serving itscommunity and to provide empowerment to many of the community’s residents. Thispartnership proved to be a win-win effort.While the Government Program provided the people with a job, it was the enthusiasmand will of these individuals on the other end, which helped Universidad Popular achievegreater heights in its history, by reaching long time goals, strengthening its differentprograms and departments while creating other pilot programs.ConsequencesThrough Youth Employment for the Summer Program, hundreds of unemployed andunderemployed Illinois youth were connected to subsidized employment opportunities.In just four months we generated a great economic impact in our community.We were able to find employment for over 400 young men and women that have the willto work, and the desire to grow personally.Universidad Popular has been able to offer this employment due to the strong passion ofmany dedicated team members and the encouragement derived from the development ofa strong relationship with the city of Chicago (DFSS) and the State of Illinois (DHS). Also,UP was able to find gainful employment for hundreds of youth.We conclude by stating that this Government Program is a much needed asset in today’seconomic and social climate.Universidad Popular can create a stronger and lasting effect on more families andindividuals who take advantage of this Program.Section One: Universidad Popular’s Organizational Description Education with the people 34
  36. 36. Education by the people Education for the peopleChapter One: From Latin Center to Universidad PopularHistory is not the only witness to a dream come true.Many Hispanic and non Hispanic Chicago residents have been witnesses to the oldsaying that goes dreams do come true.Since its beginning in Chicago in the decade of the 1970’s, Universidad Popular hasbecome known as a place where community residents come to learn with, by and fromone another. It currently offers services to over 600 adults and children in the Pilsen,Little Village, and Chicago Lawn areas of Chicago, Il. 35
  37. 37. It has been more than 30 years now, that Universidad Popular has been bridging the gapbetween the Hispanic community and opportunities for the development of their personaland family lives.The world in which most Hispanics live in Chicago is affected by linguistic, economic andlegalobstacles.It began seeking outfor ways to help the people overcome these obstacles, obstacles thatimpeded them to advance and to grow in a land of opportunity and liberty.It did this in an innovative way. That is why Universidad Popular’s motto is:Education with the people, by the people, for the people.Chapter Two: Universidad Popular’s PresentAt present Universidad Popular is a 38 year old Community Based NonprofitOrganization that focuses on promoting community empowerment for Hispanic familiesby means of participatory learning.Universidad Popular serves over 2,000 people every year through various projects andprograms.Universidad Popular’s programs are focused on serving families, adults, seniors, andyouth, by means of financial, digital, health, and family literacy; youth development; 36
  38. 38. language skills acquisition; legal aid; citizenshipassistance, civic education; anddevelopment and sponsorship of community events.Universidad Popular also advocates for social justice to secure just and equal distributionof services and resources to low-income Hispanic families in the Chicago area.Throughout its history Universidad Popular has been continually creating opportunitiesfor local Hispanicyouth.At present it decided to come up with a youth program which has the ultimate purpose ofequipping local youngsters with additional tools to succeed in their academic pursuits, inthe community, and ultimately, in life. This allows them the opportunity to give back totheir community.Chapter Three: Universidad Popular’s MissionUniversidad Popular wishes to promote neighborhood development and communityempowerment via the praxis of participatory learning or popular education.Universidad Popular’s brand of community work is rotted in the educational philosophyof Paulo Freire, the world renowned Latin American educator. For this reason,Universidad Popular believes that to succeed in the community, education must be donewith the participation of local residents. 37
  39. 39. Due to such a standing, it shies away from traditional paradigms of community workcharacterized by giving programs to the community.Instead, it chooses to carry out activities, projects and programs such as education with,by and for the community.Universidad Popular’s confidence in the ability of so-called ―voiceless‖ people to empowerthemselves has led it to rely on self-help for the conceptualization and implementation ofits programs. Today, as always, it depends heavily upon its volunteers—many of whomare current or former program participants—to help others in their quest forimprovement. Facilitators and participants work together to design programs of studythat stem from and are relevant to their lives. They are tailored to participants’particular needs.By thriving on partnerships with public and non-public, for-profit and non-profitorganizations operating within the community, UP’s methodology of community workincorporates teaching and learning interchangeably by allowing direct participation with,by and for the people.Since its very inception in the early 1970’s, Universidad Popular has adopted the practiceof branching itself out to various parts of the city. This explains its presence currently inChicago Lawn, Pilsen, Humboldt Park, Little Village, and Logan Square.Universidad Popular has become known as a place where community residents come tolearn with, by and from one another.Under this guidance, Universidad Popular hasproceeded through its 30-plus years of existence, forging its very own trademark ofparticipatory or popular education.Section Two: The Missing Link Creativity is thinking up new things. Innovation is doing new things Theodore Levitt 38
  40. 40. Innovation by definition will not be accepted at first. It takes repeated attempts, endless demonstrations, and monotonous rehearsals before innovation can be accepted and internalized by an organization. This requires “courageous patience” Warren Bennis Innovation is the ability to see change as an opportunity - not a threat AnonymousChapter One: Project DevelopmentUniversidad Popular had a remarkable past.Universidad Popular has an important present. 39
  41. 41. But, how can it improve and grow in such a way that it becomes even stronger andinfluential?To reach its full potential Universidad Popular needed to develop new strategies. Tostrengthen its presence and purpose it had to engineer new ways of doing things andventuring to unknown waters so it could swim to higher and better things.Such an answer was found in the creation of a Project Development Department.Project Development guides Universidad Popular to its future.Project Development is the discipline of planning, organizing, and managing resources tobring about the successful completion of specific project goals and objectives.Universidad Popular needed the development of more programs, the expansion of itsideas and the enhancement of its dreams.Universidad Popular can’t advance one more step without the aid of its ProjectDevelopment Department for it holds the key to its future success.Project Development brings about new and enhanced ways of doing things and handlingissues that work for the perfection of its mission and the progression of its vision.Universidad Popular must have a clear understanding that its fate is rooted in themission and work of its Project Development Department.The Project Development Department in any organization functions as the missing linkbetween advancement and stagnation, progress or more of the same, the piece of thepuzzle needed to complete the whole picture.Chapter Two: The VisionDreams and desires are the fuel for actions. 40
  42. 42. In this case, Universidad Popular needed a new vision, a different way of looking atthings.This is where Project Development appears. Project Development sees what it can be,sees potential and works toward tangible and concrete ventures to make it a reality.The Project Development Department’s vision for Universidad Popular is to help it achieveits full potential as a Community Based Organization. The Project DevelopmentDepartment knows that Universidad Popular can achieve much more than what it hasuntil now.The vision sets Universidad Popular as a top Community Based Organization with awider spectrum for community development and advocacy.To be able to do this, Universidad Popular will see new programs created and variousways of obtaining private and public cooperation to succeed in attaining its objectivesand goals.The Project Development Department’s visionsets Universidad Popular as a growing,dynamic, fresh, vibrant, strong, trusted Community Based Organization that is costeffective and administratively efficient. Also, the visionsets Universidad Popular attaininga deeper relationship with Government Agencies as well as with other Private SectorOrganizations that can enable it to reach its goals.A better organization helps in better ways, which translates to having a bettercommunity.Chapter Three: The Mission 41
  43. 43. The Project Development Department’s mission began early this year.The Project Development Director established meetings with Universidad Popular staffmembers and along with them established the foundations of what this Departmentwould do and the basis for a clear, honest, respectful relationship.It underwent a transformation, a transformation that would determine opportunities tostand out, be noticed for their quality, and go to the next level.The key was organizational strength so that everybody could work well together, as ateam. With that Universidad Popular’s mission could be corroborated in everybody’smind, authenticating their own lives, for this was not just about a job, nor not justmaking a living…but it was for that common goal: Changing lives.Everybody at those meetings underwent a re-learning of what being part of UniversidadPopular really meant. It meant that if I become a better person, Universidad Popularbecomes a better organization. Something that enriched these experiences was the birthof a Social Contract. This enriched everybody’s perspectives and got them to be in linewith Universidad Popular, walking in unison side by side.Universidad Popular’s Project Development Department saw a response, the effect of thatre-learning. The message had come across. Now everybody was ready to advanceknowing what the mission was. Now collaboration in the Department’s futuredevelopments would be understood and full of conviction. 42
  44. 44. Chapter Four: The ProgressAt times, for some progress may seem as an illusion, for several other people progressmay seem as a very distant possibility, while for others it is not the destination whatmatters but the journey, the journey toward that destination.Achieving progress is not for the faint of heart, it is for those who fight reaching for theirgoals with permanent effort and rock solid faith. They understand that it is not what youare what gets you there, but that it is what you do what gets you there and beyond.Progress did not come to the Project Development Department automatically as if by theswift movement of a magic wand; progress came as a fruit of commitment andunderstanding, hard work and teamwork, working all together toward the same place onthe same road.Another very important element that triggered progress was the implementation of newways of doing and achieving things for Universidad Popular, processes that led effortstowards common goals, assuring positive effects.Such processes toward progress were the Increasing Growth Proposal, Strategic ActionPlans, Strategic Alliances and Partnerships and the evaluation paperwork for these andother ventures.For example, the Increasing Growth Proposal is a proactive, consistent, on-goingapproach of innovative and creative ideas, of new social purpose ventures,community outreach through popular education, social responsibility and socialentrepreneurship, enthusiastic voluntarism community participation, social economicimpact, information availability and transparency, nonprofit and for profit businessdevelopment and growth of mission related goals.Of course, the Department suffered its lack of participation, unbelief by some anddistrust by others. The Project Development Department had to prove itself, and it alsostrived to gain the collaboration of some persons, but it managed to get through it all. 43
  45. 45. Section Three: The Partnership-Serving Our Community Together Individually, we are one drop. Together, we are an ocean Ryunosuke Satoro Coming together is a beginning. Keeping together is progress. Working together is success Henry Ford 44
  46. 46. Chapter One: The Federal/State Job ProgramsWe’ve spoken about the lack of jobs.Now let us talk about job creation.Job creation programs are programs or projects undertaken by a government of a nationin order to assist unemployed members of the population in seeking employment. Theyare especially common during times of high unemployment. They may either concentrateon macroeconomic policy in order to increase the supply of jobs, or create more efficientmeans to pair employment seekers to their prospective employers.The Federal Government has provided the Nation with billions of dollars for the creationof new jobs in every state.That is why legislation has been passed allowing for billions of dollars to be allocated injob creation via the Economic Stimulus Package, fostering economic growth and createand maintain jobsThere are numerous Federal Funding Sources for Public Job Creation Initiatives. Suchinitiatives provide paid work and learning opportunities for individuals with few work-related skills and little or no recent work experience. By design, the Federal Governmentinvests substantial sums to enhance participants employability.A broad range of Federal Grant Programs focused on economic or communitydevelopment, housing, transportation, crime prevention, environmental protection, andother economic stimulus goals can also be tapped to cover at least some of the costsincurred in public job creation efforts.Job creation programs lay down the foundation for economic development, especially ineconomic depressed areas or among minorities that are underemployed or have troubleobtaining a job. These programs provide the opportunity that many otherwise, would nothave. 45
  47. 47. Chapter Two: Put Illinois To Work Program (PITW)Put Illinois to Work is a statewide program created by Illinois Governor Pat Quinn andthe Illinois Department of Human Services. This program, utilizing state funds andfederal stimulus dollars, is administered in partnership with Heartland Human CareServices, Inc. (HHCS) and the Illinois Department of Commerce and EconomicOpportunity aimed at stimulating the economy and local job market by creatingthousands of job opportunities providing subsidized wages to eligible unemployed, low-income parents and young adults throughout Illinois.Through Put Illinois to Work, 26,000 unemployed and underemployed Illinois residentswere connected to subsidized employment opportunities, it has given them job trainingand work experience.TheFederal Government has extended this Stimulus Work Relief Program; Governor PatQuinn took action to ensure that funds were available to maintain the Put Illinois toWork program for two months. These two months will serve as a bridge to allow time forFederal Action.This extension keeps the program active past Nov. 2nd. It will be paid for with $75 millionin state money.The two month extension allows those currently enrolled in Put Illinois to Work to remainin their placements and to continue to gain valuable work experience while earningmoney to support themselves and their families.Employers can expand their business with Put Illinois to Work.Benefits offered by Put Illinois To Work include:1. No wage expenses for employers.2. The opportunity to train new workers on your unique internal processes/procedures, at no cost to you, with the option to hire them.3. The chance to expand your business when you otherwise would not be able to.4. Potential state and federal tax credits may be available.Through Put Illinois to Work HHCS will:Recruit workers, pay workers compensation and Social Security, maintain payroll. 46
  48. 48. Part One: Invitation then Research and InvestigationSeek and you shall find said Jesus. Following His everlasting words proved useful whenthe Program Development Department sought ways to contribute to the advancementefforts of Universidad Popular.The way in which it could promote this Community Based Organization’s developmentefforts and help the community was by partnering with the state to use this program.The Research & Investigation team had its hands full locating the appropriateinformation so Universidad Popular could tag team with the government of the State ofIllinois to provide itself with this great opportunity. This opportunity had a doublebenefit; it benefitted Universidad Popular by getting subsidized human resources to workin favor of its development goals, while the State Government provided the city withmuch needed economic development.With the appropriate information gathered it was time to act, Universidad Popular wouldhave to enroll as a workplace to take advantage of the opportunity. 47
  49. 49. Part Two: Enrolling as a WorksiteAccording to the Put Illinois To Work Program Official Website, which is(http://www.dhs.state.il.us/page.aspx?item=49106) the requirements to enroll as aviable worksite are the following:Private, non-profit, and government entities are eligible employers. They must have jobslots available and meet the following criteria:1) Businesses must provide a Federal Employer Identification Number (FEIN).2) Businesses must provide a DUNS number, a unique nine-character number that identifies your organization. If you do not have a DUNS number, you may request a DUNS number at no charge to you. You will be able to apply for Put Illinois to Work without a DUNS number, but you will be required to apply for a DUNS number and present it to Put Illinois to Work staff upon receipt of it. You may also be subject to additional eligibility verifications.3) Businesses must not be in default on payroll taxes or business taxes.4) Put Illinois to Work is not intended to subsidize a business current workforce. Employers may not rehire individuals that were laid-off after March 15, 2010.5) Businesses must agree to comply with all applicable labor laws.6) Put Illinois to Work trainee-workers must not comprise more than 50% of the business workforce at each worksite.7) There is a thirty (30) hour weekly minimum work requirement for Put Illinois to Work trainee-workers. Businesses/Employers must agree to meet this thirty (30) hour weekly minimum.8) Businesses must provide the necessary training to Put Illinois to Work worker- trainees to ensure competent and successful job performance, and to obtain transferable skills.9) Business owners/Employers cannot employ family members as part of the Put Illinois to Work program. Put Illinois to Work worker-trainees may not be related by blood or marriage to the employer. 48
  50. 50. Part Three: Synergizing the PITW Program into UP’s ProgramsThis partnership provided a mutually advantageous conjunction and compatibility ofdistinct elements which came in the form of resources from the State Government via theJob Program and as efforts from the people that would be employed.The Put Illinois To Work Job Program allowed Universidad Popular an almost immediatehelp to staff the Pilot Programs the Program Development Department had created, andalso to provide extra staff to other Universidad Popular Departments.This boost in workforce or Human Resources allowed Universidad Popular to reach itsgoals in a way that otherwise would have been impossible.The Put Illinois To Work Job Programand the Program Development Departmentcomplemented each other.They functioned as well oiled gear. 49
  51. 51. Part Four: Searching for ApplicantsIt was thru ads that Universidad Popular searched for its future workforce.Universidad Popular knew the profile of the persons that it needed.Now it was just time to wait and see.The expectation of obtaining a workforce that would enable Universidad Popular developits pilot programs and keep giving the community through its already establishedprograms was another incentive to expect the best.The results of this search effort did not delay much. Universidad Popular began seeingthe response to its ads in the form of hundreds upon hundreds of youth, young adultsand adults coming to Universidad Popular as the thirsty to an oasis. 50
  52. 52. Part Five: Interviews and HiringSeparate the wheat from the chaff.Not everyone can nor must be accepted.Universidad Popular was about to go through one of the toughest processes inadministration:Selection.Universidad Popular needed to select the best persons that fitted the profile of theindividual that it had in mind.Out of hundreds, the persons that fitted that profile were hired.Universidad Popular’s staff conducted the interviews in light of the processes elaboratedby the Program Development Department for the occasion.Of course, the Program Development Department had already created an ample array ofpaperwork ensuring that this process would turn out the way it had already beenplanned. Such as staff hiring procedures and staff selection procedures.It was the utilization of this paperwork which allowed Universidad Popular to get the bestpersons for the different positions. The Program Development Department made surethat this whole process of interviewing, selection and hiring would prove to be efficientand revealing enough, as to choose the correct individuals for the vast work ahead.Having done this, Universidad Popular was ready, willing and able for the next step:Training. 51
  53. 53. Part Six: Information ProcessingAt the time the new employees were hired, Universidad Popular had to process their ownpaperwork, this to make sure they were eligible under State and Federal laws andregulations.The Program Development Department had already come up with the appropriate officialdocumentation to process their paperwork.These formalities are of the utmost importance, for they guarantee the Organization ofthe legal barriers that a determined individual may have, thus keeping the Organizationfrom unnecessarypredicaments.Once their information had been checked and cleared from any obstruction, it was timefor Universidad Popular to keep preparing these individuals for their work ahead. 52
  54. 54. Part Seven: Inviting Others to Participate (Member 2 Member)Another of the Program Development Department’s innovative ideas was a very creativeone called Member2Member.A sort of personal invitation from a Universidad Popular member to one or more of hisfriends, relatives, comrades and acquaintances to become a member of the UniversidadPopular family.Inviting others to participate in this fashion proves to be a very effective way, for it’s theclosest people around you who notice the positive changes Universidad Popular’sPrograms have on the individual.From legal counsel to English literacy, from computer literacy to healthier ways of living,it’s all there; anybody can spot the differences Universidad Popular makes on theindividual.The person invited has the closest of evidences, the person who invited him.Whenever a community member notices a positive change on another person, it causes acertain curiosity, and it is this curiosity that leads the person toward UniversidadPopular with the expectation of improvement.This happens in the understanding that if that person obtained such benefits, then hecan also obtain them.Word of mouth has for many years been the chief option, we could even say that it’s, attimes, the only option that persons have to communicate their messages. And it hasproven to be as effective yesterday than today. 53
  55. 55. Part Eight: Processing the PaperworkOnce the person has been hired and trained.It’s time for the individual to receive the official paperwork to satisfy Universidad Popularand The Program Development Departments expectations.This paperwork permitted Universidad Popular to exercise control over its employeesguiding them toward Universidad Popular and the Program Development Department’sgoals.This also kept everybody in tune with the specifications for their job and made sure theemployees would do what they were supposed to do as they were supposed to do it.Each employee chose the area they knew they could do their best effort in.Universidad Popular via the Program Development Department produced employeeperformance evaluations, sign up forms for each department, as well as the staff hiringand staff selection procedures.Everything was ready to function and everybody was ready to work. 54
  56. 56. Part Nine: Adjustments and ContinuityLike any other mechanism these sort of programs need to be systematically reviewed toassure optimization.That is why the Program Development Department adjusted procedures and allowed forcontinuity of its endeavor by way of developing procedures that informed it about theperformance of the employees. 55
  57. 57. Chapter Three: Youth Employment for the Summer Program (YES)This is a program created by Illinois Governor Pat Quinn, the Department of HumanServices and the Department of Commerce andEconomic Opportunity, the states jobcreation, employment and training agency.It allows targeted youth to earn money this summer and get work experience.Their ad read:If you are looking for hands-on work experience, the YES program isan excellentemployment opportunity!The Illinois YES (Youth Employment for the Summer) programprovides temporary workfor eligible young adults who are: 16-24 years old unemployed and underemployed low-income parents and young adultsBenefits offered by YES include: 30 - 40 hours of work per week Flexible hours, based on your school schedule Connections with employers looking for workers Additional career experience and job skills 56
  58. 58. Part One: Discovering the Need and Acting ProactivelyToday’s youth more than ever need to have the necessary opportunities for a standarddevelopment and growth.Due to all the influences that assault youth early on, we must make sure they canproperly develop themselves in the healthiest way possible.One way by which that can beachieved is by using work programs such Illinois’ ownYouth Employment for the Summer.This is extremely important in places like Little Village, the part of Chicago whereUniversidad Popular has its headquarters.This is a place where over 60% of the populations of Little Village are minors. Ironicallyenough, though, this community lacks public spaces for youth to be and developthemselves. The quality of schools, libraries, parks, clinics, etc. leaves a lot to be desired.Dr. Gabriel Cortes, a Northeastern Illinois University Assistant Professor, suggests thatLittle Village kids are at least 2 years behind their counterparts in the suburban schoolsnearby. In such a context, it is no surprise that there are such large numbers of factorsimpeding youths’ success.It is easy to understand the pervasive sense of powerlessness and hopelessness withinthe youth segment of this community.There are several problems affecting youth in Little Village, but the most prominent are:gang violence, academic deficiencies, lack of access to resources, and lack of socialspaces to engage in positive behavior.Because of this the Youth Employment for the Summer is a very strong factor that canaffect them positively in this community.Universidad Popular partnered with the State Government to provide local youth withmeaningful jobs that would give them experience and develop their abilities. 57
  59. 59. Part Two: The Protest 58
  60. 60. Part Three: Invitation then Research and InvestigationKnock and it shall be opened said Jesus. Following His everlasting words proved usefulwhen the Program Development Department sought ways to contribute to theadvancement efforts of Universidad Popular.The way in which it could promote this Community Based Organization’s developmentefforts and help the community was by partnering with the state to use this program.The Research & Investigation team had its hands full locating the appropriateinformation so Universidad Popular could tag team with the government of the State ofIllinois to provide itself with this great opportunity. This opportunity had a doublebenefit; it benefitted Universidad Popular by getting subsidized human resources to workin favor of its development goals, while the State Government provided the city withmuch needed economic development.With the appropriate information gathered it was time to act, Universidad Popular wouldhave to enroll as a workplace to take advantage of the opportunity. 59
  61. 61. Part Four: Enrolling as a WorksiteThe requirements to enroll as a viable worksite are the following:Private, non-profit, and government entities are eligible employers. They must have jobslots available and meet the following criteria:1) Businesses must provide a Federal Employer Identification Number (FEIN).2) Businesses must provide a DUNS number, a unique nine-character number that identifies your organization. If you do not have a DUNS number, you may request a DUNS number at no charge to you. You will be able to apply for Put Illinois to Work without a DUNS number, but you will be required to apply for a DUNS number and present it to Put Illinois to Work staff upon receipt of it. You may also be subject to additional eligibility verifications.3) Businesses must not be in default on payroll taxes or business taxes.4) Put Illinois to Work is not intended to subsidize a business current workforce. Employers may not rehire individuals that were laid-off after March 15, 2010.5) Businesses must agree to comply with all applicable labor laws.6) Put Illinois to Work trainee-workers must not comprise more than 50% of the business workforce at each worksite.7) There is a thirty (30) hour weekly minimum work requirement for Put Illinois to Work trainee-workers. Businesses/Employers must agree to meet this thirty (30) hour weekly minimum.8) Businesses must provide the necessary training to Put Illinois to Work worker-trainees to ensure competent and successful job performance, and to obtain transferable skills.9) Business owners/Employers cannot employ family members as part of the Put Illinois to Work program. Put Illinois to Work worker-trainees may not be related by blood or marriage to the employer. 60
  62. 62. Part Five: Three: Synergizing the YES Program into UP’s ProgramsThe Youth Employment for the Summer gave Universidad Popular the right influx ofpower and ability at the exact time.Given the desire and readiness of youth to participate it was just a matter of ordering theissue so the Program Development Department could direct them in the desired path.This partnership displayed mutually advantages benefits for the parts.Universidad Popular obtained much needed human resources to keep its own programsactive and the added human resources to staff newly created departments.It also provided a conjunction of needs that was met in a very successful manner.The compatibility of these elements came into play when these youth met UniversidadPopular.The Youth Employment for the Summer Job Program permitted Universidad Popular tostaff the Pilot Programs the Program Development Department had created, and to alsoprovide the necessary staff for the other Departments in Universidad Popular.This boost in workforce or Human Resources allowed Universidad Popular to reach itsgoals in a way that otherwise would have been impossible.The Youth Employment for the Summer Job Program certainly worked. 61

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