Open Educational Resources and the Future of Higher Education Dr Li Yuan Institute for Educational Cybernetics University ...
Key Concepts
Definition of Openness  <ul><li>“ Digitised materials offered freely and openly for educators, students and self-learners ...
Components of OERs <ul><li>Learning Content (full courses, courseware, content modules, learning objects, collections and ...
The four ‘R’s of openness <ul><li>Reuse – allow others  to freely use all or part of the unaltered, verbatim work. </li></...
What is Creative Commons  Creative Commons lets people share their work (photos, writing, etc.) with the world so that any...
License Conditions Attribution (BY), requiring attribution to the original author;  Share Alike (SA), allowing  derivative...
Why Open Educational Resources <ul><li>Reduce the costs of education to learners </li></ul><ul><li>Make education globally...
OER initiatives
Examples of OERs MIT OpenCourseWare
Examples of OERs OpenLearn/ Open University UK
Examples of OERs China Open Resource for Education (CORE)
UK OER Programme  OpenSpires -  University of Oxford
UK OER Programme  JorumOpen/UKOERs
Impacts on Higher Education
Content is infrastructure “ We must deploy a sufficient amount of content, on a sufficient number of topics, at a sufficie...
<ul><li>“ The UK must have a core of open access learning resources organised in a coherent way to support on-line and ble...
OERs and the Future of Higher Education  Higher Education  OERs  Learning Communities  Learners’ Support Credit on Demand
Learning with experts and communities
Blogs Videos  OER course David Wiley
Blogs Videos   OER course Stephen Downes
Blogs Videos   P2PU Stian Haklev
<ul><li>Thanks for your attention!!! </li></ul>Contact details: JISC CETIS  Institute for Educational Cybernetics  Univers...
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Open Educational Resources and the Future of Higher Education

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PowerPoint slides for the online Chinese Masters course of Design Learning for 21st Century at IEC in the University of Bolton

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  • The term “Open Educational Resources” (OER) was coined at a 2002 UNESCO conference, and refers to the rapidly growing phenomenon of sharing educational resources freely online. Projects have and being developed in several American institutions, and in almost 30 countries.  These “open resources” can be accessed by the wide educational community of teachers and students in all contexts, which has the potential to radically expand access to education, but raises many questions. How can pedagogical models and online communities support this kind of learning? Are there ways of providing accreditation for new forms of informal learning? Join us as we give an overview of the field of open education, and participate in the discussion about this new dimension that will impact Canadian higher education in coming years. We will discuss new opportunities for U of T courses, including the challenge of locating high quality, relevant materials for courses (both online and face-to-face) and of integrating these materials in order to enhance student learning. We will discuss the implications of open education for university educators and researchers, as well as other communities of learners such as those in developing nations or those who wish to organize their own program of study.
  • License Conditions Creators choose a set of conditions they wish to apply to their work. Attribution by You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your copyrighted work — and derivative works based upon it — but only if they give credit the way you request. Share Alike sa You allow others to distribute derivative works only under a license identical to the license that governs your work. Non-Commercial nc You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your work — and derivative works based upon it — but for non-commercial purposes only. No Derivative Works nd You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform only verbatim copies of your work, not derivative works based upon it. License Conditions Creators choose a set of conditions they wish to apply to their work. Attribution by You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your copyrighted work — and derivative works based upon it — but only if they give credit the way you request. Share Alike sa You allow others to distribute derivative works only under a license identical to the license that governs your work. Non-Commercial nc You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your work — and derivative works based upon it — but for non-commercial purposes only. No Derivative Works nd You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform only verbatim copies of your work, not derivative works based upon it.
  • License Conditions Creators choose a set of conditions they wish to apply to their work. Attribution by You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your copyrighted work — and derivative works based upon it — but only if they give credit the way you request. Share Alike sa You allow others to distribute derivative works only under a license identical to the license that governs your work. Non-Commercial nc You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your work — and derivative works based upon it — but for non-commercial purposes only. No Derivative Works nd You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform only verbatim copies of your work, not derivative works based upon it. License Conditions Creators choose a set of conditions they wish to apply to their work. Attribution by You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your copyrighted work — and derivative works based upon it — but only if they give credit the way you request. Share Alike sa You allow others to distribute derivative works only under a license identical to the license that governs your work. Non-Commercial nc You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your work — and derivative works based upon it — but for non-commercial purposes only. No Derivative Works nd You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform only verbatim copies of your work, not derivative works based upon it.
  • In the case of roads, we can see people establishing a variety of transportation services (taxis, shuttles), delivery services (food, packages), support services (towing, tire repair), and other services. In the case of content, when there is a sufficient amount of open educational content on a sufficient number of topics at sufficient quality, we can also expect to see experimentation and innovation in localization services (translation, low-bandwidth delivery), accreditation services (degrees, certificates), and support services (tutors, study group locators).
  • In the case of roads, we can see people establishing a variety of transportation services (taxis, shuttles), delivery services (food, packages), support services (towing, tire repair), and other services. In the case of content, when there is a sufficient amount of open educational content on a sufficient number of topics at sufficient quality, we can also expect to see experimentation and innovation in localization services (translation, low-bandwidth delivery), accreditation services (degrees, certificates), and support services (tutors, study group locators). The OpenCourseWares, the Connexions, the GLOBEs, and all the other repositories of open educational resources in the world are critical infrastructure. As such, they are necessary conditions for revolutionizing education. The revolution can not happen without them. However, open content itself is by no means a sufficient condition for the revolution to succeed. So much more is needed! The list above includes only a handful of what needs to be worked on (localization, translation, low-bandwidth delivery, accreditation, degrees, certificates, support, tutors, study group locators).
  • Open Educational Resources and the Future of Higher Education

    1. 1. Open Educational Resources and the Future of Higher Education Dr Li Yuan Institute for Educational Cybernetics University of Bolton
    2. 2. Key Concepts
    3. 3. Definition of Openness <ul><li>“ Digitised materials offered freely and openly for educators, students and self-learners to use and reuse for teaching, learning and research” (OECD, 2007) </li></ul>
    4. 4. Components of OERs <ul><li>Learning Content (full courses, courseware, content modules, learning objects, collections and journals) </li></ul><ul><li>Tools (software to support the development, use, re-use and delivery of learning content) </li></ul><ul><li>Implementation process (intellectual property licenses to promote open publishing of materials) </li></ul><ul><li>(OECD, 2007) </li></ul>
    5. 5. The four ‘R’s of openness <ul><li>Reuse – allow others to freely use all or part of the unaltered, verbatim work. </li></ul><ul><li>Redistribute – share copies of the work with others. </li></ul><ul><li>Revise – allow to adapt, modify, translate, or change the form of the work </li></ul><ul><li>Remix – allow to take two or more existing resources and combine them to create a new resource </li></ul>
    6. 6. What is Creative Commons Creative Commons lets people share their work (photos, writing, etc.) with the world so that anyone can use and remix their creations under the licensing terms the authors provide. It is usually denoted with “Some Rights Reserved” as opposed to “All Rights Reserved .”
    7. 7. License Conditions Attribution (BY), requiring attribution to the original author; Share Alike (SA), allowing derivative works under the same or a similar license (later or jurisdiction version); Non-Commercial (NC), requiring the work is not used for commercial purposes; and No Derivative Works (ND), allowing only the original work, without derivatives. There are four major conditions of the Creative Commons:
    8. 8. Why Open Educational Resources <ul><li>Reduce the costs of education to learners </li></ul><ul><li>Make education globally accessible </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborate, share and partner to use and provide open content </li></ul><ul><li>Increase quality through reusing and localising content </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid duplication of effort </li></ul><ul><li>Change a culture </li></ul>
    9. 9. OER initiatives
    10. 10. Examples of OERs MIT OpenCourseWare
    11. 11. Examples of OERs OpenLearn/ Open University UK
    12. 12. Examples of OERs China Open Resource for Education (CORE)
    13. 13. UK OER Programme OpenSpires - University of Oxford
    14. 14. UK OER Programme JorumOpen/UKOERs
    15. 15. Impacts on Higher Education
    16. 16. Content is infrastructure “ We must deploy a sufficient amount of content, on a sufficient number of topics, at a sufficient level of quality, available at sufficiently low cost before we can expect large scale educational experimentation and innovation”. David Wiley, 2007
    17. 17. <ul><li>“ The UK must have a core of open access learning resources organised in a coherent way to support on-line and blended learning by all higher education institutions and to make it more widely available in non-HE environments”. </li></ul><ul><li>On-line Innovation in Higher Education </li></ul><ul><li>Sir Ron Cooke (2008) </li></ul>The UK Vision of OERs
    18. 18. OERs and the Future of Higher Education Higher Education OERs Learning Communities Learners’ Support Credit on Demand
    19. 19. Learning with experts and communities
    20. 20. Blogs Videos OER course David Wiley
    21. 21. Blogs Videos OER course Stephen Downes
    22. 22. Blogs Videos P2PU Stian Haklev
    23. 23. <ul><li>Thanks for your attention!!! </li></ul>Contact details: JISC CETIS  Institute for Educational Cybernetics University of Bolton Deane Road, Bolton,  BL3 5AB Tel: +44(0)1204 903851 Fax: +44(0)1204 399074 email: [email_address] http://jisc.cetis.ac.uk/  

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