ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />WEEK 1<br />A History of Literary Crime<br />
ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />“When in doubt, have a man come through a door with a gun in his hand.”<br />	--  crime + detec...
ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />“The evolution of the crime story reflects the history of crime itself”<br />	-- Ernest Mandel,...
ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />Edgar Allen Poe’s “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” (1841) <br />– first detective story<br />
ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />     crime fiction<br />  detective fiction<br />
ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />     crime fiction<br />   		v.<br />  detective fiction<br />(“puzzle element”)<br />
ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />		I. Early Crime<br />		Narratives<br />
D.L. Sayers, “Introduction<br />Detective fiction writer and critic Dorothy L. Sayers:<br /><ul><li>4 stories, early ances...
2 Old Testament, Hercules, Herodotus</li></li></ul><li>ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br /><ul><li>Story of Hercules and Cacus 	the...
the thief falsifies footprints 	to evade capture</li></li></ul><li>ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br /><ul><li> Herodotus’ story of...
first ‘locked-room’ mystery</li></li></ul><li>Susanna and the Elders by Artemisia Gentileschi (1610)<br />Biblical story <...
Cain leads Abel to Death by James Tissot(1836-1902)<br />Cain and <br />Abel,    <br />story of<br />“first <br />murder”<...
ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />- Nathaniel Hawthorne,The Scarlet Letter (1850)<br /><ul><li> crime defined as social </li></ul...
ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />II. Crime and <br />Revenge<br />
ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />“Revenge Tragedy”<br /><ul><li>Late Elizabethean/ Early 	Jacobean drama
end of the 16th – beginning
of the 17th centuries</li></li></ul><li>ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />- revenge restores social unity and order in ways that ...
ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />- Subject of revenge meets a 	bloody death, either 	by execution or by 	his/her own hand, in 	a...
ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br /><ul><li>Roman dramatist Seneca
(1st century), originator of the revenge tragedy
violence off-stage, unlike </li></ul>the Elizabethean<br />theatre <br />
ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br /><ul><li> classic detective fiction: no physical violence 	towards, no legal 	prosecution, no</l...
ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />III. “Gothic” Hauntings<br />
ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />The gothic novel (late 18th century): return of the past into the present, especially in the fo...
ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />“gothic” tradition: provides a narrative frame for “crime” as the return of a repressed wrong o...
ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />
ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />IV. Organized Crime + Criminals<br />
ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />1920’s prohibition-era gangsters, shift in fiction away from the individual criminal<br />
ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />The Godfather<br />Scarface<br />Goodfellas<br />The Sopranos<br />Grand Theft Auto<br />
ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />V. Discipline and Punish<br />
ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />Michel Foucault<br />French Philosopher, critical theorist, historian,writer of Discipline and ...
ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />
ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />Classical society – pre 19th century, punishment  <br />Disciplinary society – post-19th centur...
ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />“The Newgate Calendar” Stories<br />- popular between 1750-1850<br />- Sensationalized tales of...
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Engl 211 summer 2010 week 1.1.3

  1. 1. ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />WEEK 1<br />A History of Literary Crime<br />
  2. 2. ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />“When in doubt, have a man come through a door with a gun in his hand.”<br /> -- crime + detective novelist <br /> Raymond Chandler, on writing <br /> fiction<br />
  3. 3. ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />“The evolution of the crime story reflects the history of crime itself”<br /> -- Ernest Mandel, Delightful Murder: A Social History of the Crime Story<br />
  4. 4. ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />Edgar Allen Poe’s “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” (1841) <br />– first detective story<br />
  5. 5. ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br /> crime fiction<br /> detective fiction<br />
  6. 6. ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br /> crime fiction<br /> v.<br /> detective fiction<br />(“puzzle element”)<br />
  7. 7. ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br /> I. Early Crime<br /> Narratives<br />
  8. 8. D.L. Sayers, “Introduction<br />Detective fiction writer and critic Dorothy L. Sayers:<br /><ul><li>4 stories, early ancestors of crime story
  9. 9. 2 Old Testament, Hercules, Herodotus</li></li></ul><li>ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br /><ul><li>Story of Hercules and Cacus the thief
  10. 10. the thief falsifies footprints to evade capture</li></li></ul><li>ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br /><ul><li> Herodotus’ story of King Rhampsinitus and the thief (5th Century BC)
  11. 11. first ‘locked-room’ mystery</li></li></ul><li>Susanna and the Elders by Artemisia Gentileschi (1610)<br />Biblical story <br />of <br />Susanna <br />and the Elders<br />
  12. 12. Cain leads Abel to Death by James Tissot(1836-1902)<br />Cain and <br />Abel, <br />story of<br />“first <br />murder”<br />
  13. 13. ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />- Nathaniel Hawthorne,The Scarlet Letter (1850)<br /><ul><li> crime defined as social </li></ul> transgression (sets boundaries of acceptable social behaviour)<br />- criminal is marked<br />
  14. 14. ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />II. Crime and <br />Revenge<br />
  15. 15. ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />“Revenge Tragedy”<br /><ul><li>Late Elizabethean/ Early Jacobean drama
  16. 16. end of the 16th – beginning
  17. 17. of the 17th centuries</li></li></ul><li>ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />- revenge restores social unity and order in ways that official institutions of justice cannot or will not (Hamlet, 1601)<br />
  18. 18. ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />- Subject of revenge meets a bloody death, either by execution or by his/her own hand, in anticipation of being caught<br />
  19. 19. ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br /><ul><li>Roman dramatist Seneca
  20. 20. (1st century), originator of the revenge tragedy
  21. 21. violence off-stage, unlike </li></ul>the Elizabethean<br />theatre <br />
  22. 22. ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br /><ul><li> classic detective fiction: no physical violence towards, no legal prosecution, no</li></ul>social exclusion of criminal<br />
  23. 23. ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />III. “Gothic” Hauntings<br />
  24. 24. ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />The gothic novel (late 18th century): return of the past into the present, especially in the form of ghosts or supernatural events<br />
  25. 25. ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />“gothic” tradition: provides a narrative frame for “crime” as the return of a repressed wrong of the past into the world of the present<br />
  26. 26. ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />
  27. 27. ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />IV. Organized Crime + Criminals<br />
  28. 28. ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />1920’s prohibition-era gangsters, shift in fiction away from the individual criminal<br />
  29. 29. ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />The Godfather<br />Scarface<br />Goodfellas<br />The Sopranos<br />Grand Theft Auto<br />
  30. 30. ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />V. Discipline and Punish<br />
  31. 31. ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />Michel Foucault<br />French Philosopher, critical theorist, historian,writer of Discipline and Punish (1975)<br />
  32. 32. ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />
  33. 33. ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />Classical society – pre 19th century, punishment <br />Disciplinary society – post-19th century, surveillance<br />
  34. 34. ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />“The Newgate Calendar” Stories<br />- popular between 1750-1850<br />- Sensationalized tales of crime and punishment <br />
  35. 35. ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />
  36. 36. ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br />“Who is the bigger criminal: he who robs a bank or he who founds one?”<br /> -- playwright and Marxist <br />Bertolt Brecht, <br /> The Threepenny Opera (1928)<br />
  37. 37. ENGL 211, Summer 2010<br /> Questions<br />
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