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Problem Based Learning2

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introduction to problem based learning

introduction to problem based learning

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  • Problem based Learning gets students thinking critically and is an excellent strategy to use in order to allow students to experience mathematics!
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  • 1. P r o b l e m B a s e d L e a r n i n g T 3 & K ( T a m m y , T i m , T r i n i t y , K a t r i n )
  • 2. PBL Steps Topic Introduction Problem Statement Hypothesize Additional Information Closure Data Requests Learning Issues
  • 3. The Steps
    • 1. Topic Introduction
      • Explore the issues.
      • What do we want to know?
      • What do we want to know?
    • 2. Problem Statement
      • Develop, and write out, the problem statement in your own words.
    • 3. Hypothesize
      • List out possible solutions.
      • List actions to be taken with a timeline.
    • 4. Additional Information
      • What do we need to know?
        • Data Requests
        • Identify Learning Issues
    • 5. Closure
      • Write up your solution with its supporting documentation, and submit it.
      • Review your performance.
    • 6. Celebrate your work!
  • 4. PBL Steps Topic Introduction Explore the issues. What do we want to know? What do we want to know? Develop, and write out, the problem statement in your own words.
    • Hypothesize:
      • List out possible solutions.
      • List actions to be taken with a timeline.
    • Additional Information
      • What do we need to know?
    Closure Write up your solution with its supporting documentation, and submit it. Review your performance. Data Requests Learning Issues
  • 5. 1. Topic Introduction
    • What do we want to know?
    • Topic is introduced.
      • Participants brainstorm on areas of interest within this topic.
    • An "ill-structured" problem is introduced to the group
      • Discuss the problem statement and list its significant parts.
  • 6. 1. Topic Introduction
    • What do we know?
    • What do you know to solve the problem?
      • This includes both what you actually know and what strengths and capabilities each team member has.
      • Consider or note everyone's input, no matter how strange it may appear: it could hold a possibility!
  • 7. 2. Problem Statement
    • Develop, and write out the problem statement in your own words:
      • A problem statement should come from your/the group's analysis of what you know, and what you will need to know to solve it. You will need:
        • a written statement
        • the agreement of your group on the statement
        • feedback on this statement from your instructor. (This may be optional, but is a good idea)
      • Note: The problem statement is often revisited and edited as new information is discovered, or "old" information is discarded.
  • 8. 3. Hypothesize
    • List out possible solutions
      • List them all, then order them from strongest to weakest
      • Choose the best one, or most likely to succeed
  • 9. 3. Hypothesize
    • List actions to be taken with a timeline
      • What do we have to know and do to solve the problem?
      • How do we rank these possibilities?
      • How do these relate to our list of solutions?
      • Do we agree?
  • 10. 4. Additional Information
    • What do we need to know?
    • Research the knowledge and data that will support your solution
    • You will need to gather information to fill in missing gaps. Identify gaps as:
      • Data Requests, or
      • Learning Issues
    • Assign and schedule research tasks, especially deadlines
    • If your research supports your solution, and if there is general agreement, go to (1). If not, go to (3)
  • 11. 4. Additional Information
    • What do we need to know?
    • Data Requests
    • Include factual information, such as:
      • Policy statements
      • Regulations
      • Lists, and records (weather data, enrollment data, official statistics, etc.)
      • Case histories (student records, patient files, etc.)
    • Justify requests
      • Why is this data important?
      • How do you intend to use the data?
  • 12. 4. Additional Information
    • What do we need to know?
    • Learning Issues
    • Address conceptual gaps
      • How to compute something.
      • Questions that can’t be answered by “looking it up.”
  • 13. 5. Closure
    • Write up your solution with its supporting documentation, and submit it.
    • You may need to present your findings and/or recommendations to a group or your classmates.
    • This should include the problem statement, questions, data gathered, analysis of data, and support for solutions or recommendations based on the data analysis: in short, the process and outcome.
  • 14.
    • Presenting and defending your conclusions:
    • The goal is to present not only your conclusions, but the foundation upon which they rest. Prepare to
    • State clearly both the problem and your conclusion
    • Summarize the process you used, options considered, and difficulties encountered
    • Convince, not overpower. Bring others to your side, or to consider without prejudice your supporting documentation and reason
    • Help others learn, as you have learned
    • If challenged
      • and you have an answer, present it clearly
      • and you don't have an answer, acknowledge it and refer it for more consideration
    • Sharing your findings with teachers and students is an opportunity in demonstrating that you have learned. If you know your subject well, this will be evident. If a challenge arises that you cannot respond to, accept it as an opportunity to be explored. However, take pride in your attention to quality when you present.
    • See also the Guide on presenting projects .
    5. Closure
  • 15. 5. Closure
    • Review your performance
    • This debriefing exercise applies both to individuals and the group.
    • Take pride in what you have done well; learn from what you have not done well. Thomas Edison took pride in unsuccessful experiments as part of his journey to successful outcomes!
  • 16. 9. Celebrate your work!
  • 17. Resources:
    • PBL @ Delaware http://www.udel.edu/pbl/
    • Problem-Based Learning, Especially In The Context of Large Classes http://chemeng.mcmaster.ca/pbl/pbl.htm
    • PBL @ Samford (Alabama) http://www.samford.edu/pbl/index.html
    • PBL @ Queens http://meds.queensu.ca/medicine/pbl/pblhome.htm
    • Joe Landsberger PBL : http://www.studygs.net/pbl.htm
    • BIZED: http://www.bized.ac.uk/current/pbl/educator.htm