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Olivier

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Transcript

  • 1. “Connection.” “Melt into the steps!” “Are you thinking messy? Think messy.” Olivier Wevers is directing practice for an upcoming show. Once described as “the Prince of Abstract,” Olivier Wevers is a creative individual rising. An accomplished dancer and choreographer from Brussels, Belgium, he received his training at the Karys Dance Center in Brussels and danced as a Principal at the Royal Winnipeg Ballet, prior to joining Pacific Northwest Ballet in 1997 where he is was a Principal Dancer until 2009, when he formed his own dance company, Whim W’him.
  • 2. As a choreographer, Olivier taps into something charged and primal. He explores the aesthetics of movement, human sexuality and music. Each piece, the dancers display “ugly” hands or a twist of an arm into a loop and feet flexed instead of pointed. Innovating dance requires a modification of current ballet terms to describe what he wants from his troop.
  • 3. I’m trying to push the boundaries of what is acceptable in dance.
  • 4. “When I choreograph I am very particular, but dancers are not instruments--they are people and I choreograph for these individual dancers.”
  • 5. Watching him at practice for the upcoming show, it’s hard not to notice his focus, his precision, his vision. He comments, “that was one to many turns, wasn’t it?” to his lead dancer. He demonstrates over and over, stepping in himself, demonstrating the motions he sees in his head. The nuances of the posture, the gesture, all the details his muscles must remember. The pressure is on Olivier to see through his vision. He comments that “The business of dance is full of challenges. The box office, is everyone happy with their seat, learning to deal with a board, dealing with volunteers.”
  • 6. “Promoting dance is all about being seen.”
  • 7. “Selling dance is like selling a vacuum. You show your work and you tell them that it is the best vacuum and they should buy it.”
  • 8. “We don’t want you to get it all. We don’t want you to understand it all. It is a little naughty.”