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Von Braun Symposium 2008: SpaceX

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Presentation by Lawrence Williams (SpaceX) at the Von Braun Memorial Symposium in Huntsville, Alabama, 22 October 2008. ...

Presentation by Lawrence Williams (SpaceX) at the Von Braun Memorial Symposium in Huntsville, Alabama, 22 October 2008.

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  • 1. SpaceX proprietary data constituting “Confidential Information” under applicable agreements. SpaceX proprietary data constituting “Confidential Information” under applicable agreements. 2008 von Braun Symposium October 22, 2008 Lawrence Williams Vice President Strategic Relations
  • 2.
    • Founded in mid-2002 with the singular goal of providing high reliability, low cost space transportation
    • Initial market is government & commercial satellites to minimize market risk
    • Transition to human transportation once technology is proven
    • Over 560 employees — grow minimum 50% per year
    • 550,000 sq ft of offices, manufacturing and production in Hawthorne, CA
    • 300 acre state-of-the-art propulsion and structural test facility in central Texas
    • Launch complexes in Kwajalein and Cape Canaveral
    Space Exploration Technologies Corporation SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Central Texas Hawthorne Headquarters Kwajalein Oct. 2, 2008
  • 3. Falcon 1 Falcon 9 Dragon Space Exploration Technologies Corporation Oct. 2, 2008
  • 4.
      • Merlin Test Stand
      • Merlin-Vac Test Stand
      • Kestrel Test Stand
      • Draco Test Stand
      • Horizontal Test Stand
      • F1 Structural Test Stand
      • F9 Structural Test Stand
      • F9 Multiengine Test Stand
      • F9 integration hanger
      • Blockhouse Control Center
      • Offices
    • All structural and propulsion testing (development, qualification & acceptance) is performed at SpaceX facility near McGregor, Texas
    Space Exploration Technologies Corporation Oct. 2, 2008
  • 5. Falcon 1 Dock Integration Hanger & Clean-room Offices Sharks Space Exploration Technologies Corporation Oct. 2, 2008
  • 6.
    • SpaceX has been granted a license for use of SLC-40 on Cape Canaveral (Former Titan IV pad)
    • Houses Integration & Payload Processing Facility
    • Demo complete; Construction underway
    • Offices just outside perimeter fence
    • LCC at south gate of CCAFS
    Space Exploration Technologies Corporation Oct. 2, 2008
  • 7. Space Exploration Technologies Corporation Oct. 2, 2008 * Flight hardware at launch site on this date Customer Launch Vehicle Departure Point Falcon 1 Flight 4 Q3 2008 Falcon I Kwajalein Malaysia Q1 2009 Falcon I Kwajalein Falcon 9 Demo Q2 2009 Falcon 9 Cape MDA Corp 2009 Falcon 9 Cape NASA COTS Demo C1 2009 Falcon 9 Cape SpaceDev 2009 Falcon 1 Kwajalein Avanti 2009 Falcon 9 Cape NASA COTS Demo C2 2009 Falcon 9 Cape SSC 2010 Falcon 1 Kwajalein NASA COTS Demo C3 2010 Falcon 9 Cape Bigelow 2011 Falcon 9 Cape
  • 8. Falcon 1 Overview
    • 2-stage small launch vehicle
    • Vehicle dia. 5.5’; Fairing dia. 5’; Length 68’
    • 1st Stage LOX/RP1 Merlin M1 engine, ~78k lbf
    • 2nd Stage LOX/RP1 Kestrel engine, ~7k lbf vac.
    • World’s lowest cost orbital launch
      • $7.9M all inclusive commercial service (Jan. 2008)
    • Launch from Kwajalein (Reagan Test Site)
    • 1st Stage Parachute/Water Recovery
    • Enhanced Falcon 1 (F1e) block upgrade planned
      • Available early 2010
    • Payload capability  LEO
      • F1: >1030 lbm (470 kg)
      • F1e: >1580 lbm (720 kg)
    Oct. 2, 2008 Space Exploration Technologies Corporation All structures, engines, most avionics and all ground systems designed (and mostly built) by SpaceX
  • 9. Space Exploration Technologies Corporation Oct. 2, 2008
  • 10.
    • 2-stage EELV-class launch vehicle
    • Vehicle dia. 12’; Fairing dia. 17’ (5.2 m); Length 180’
    • 1 st Stage LOX/RP1
      • 9 x Merlin M9 engines
    • 2 nd Stage LOX/RP1
      • 1 x Merlin M9-vac engine
    • Payload capability (Block 1):
      • 10 MT  LEO (KSC  28.5°; 200 km; circular)
      • 3.5 MT  GTO
      • 2.1 MT  TLI
      • 1.0~1.4 MT  Mars (depending on launch date)
    • Launch from the Cape (LC-40)
    • Vehicle at Cape: Dec. 2008
    • $36.75M all inclusive commercial cost (Jan. 2008 $)
    • Block upgrade planned in 2010 timeframe
    • F9-Heavy also planned
      • 3-stick configuration
      • 29 MT  LEO
    All structures, engines, most avionics and all ground systems designed (and mostly built) by SpaceX NASA human-rating Factor-of-Safety of 1.4 (vs. 1.25 for EELV) Engine-out capability from release/lift-off Space Exploration Technologies Corporation Oct. 2, 2008 Fault tolerant avionics
  • 11. Falcon 9 Qualification 1st Stage Space Exploration Technologies Corporation Oct. 2, 2008 Falcon 9 Li-P Battery Qual Unit M9-Vac Chamber & Aft-Chamber Merlin Engine Controller Merlin Engine
  • 12. Space Exploration Technologies Corporation Oct. 2, 2008
  • 13.
    • In 2005 NASA released an OTA call for an economical, commercial, American option for re-supplying ISS with cargo and crew after shuttle retirement in 2010
      • Resulting award(s) were Space Act Agreements (SAAs) negotiated with winners
    • Clear motivations are:
      • Fill the 5-year ISS service gap between Shuttle retirement (2010) and Orion (2015)
      • Encourage the growth of the commercial space industry, resulting in lower costs to all buyers
    • NASA allocated $500M to stimulate this development
      • Not intended to fund the development completely – additional private funding was expected
      • Milestone-based: we only get paid when we complete a milestone
      • NASA does not own the resulting system , but is really an investor
      • NASA may choose procure the service after capability demonstration
    • This initial funding was specifically for demonstration of cargo capability
      • Additional funding is anticipated for crewed demos after successful completion of a cargo flight
      • Plans for crewed version (if applicable) were solicited in this same proposal
    • Proposals were solicited and competitively awarded
      • Awarded in August 2006 to SpaceX ($276M) and Rocketplane-Kistler ($207M)
      • RpK has since defaulted and been terminated
      • Re-competition gave remaining $170M to Orbital
    • SpaceX officially started work Sept 1, 2006
      • Successfully completed all 12 scheduled Milestones to-date on-time! (22 total)
    Space Exploration Technologies Corporation - ITAR Controlled Material Oct. 2, 2008
  • 14.
    • Dragon spacecraft
      • Flexible, generic, reusable spacecraft
      • Identical whether cargo-only or crewed (except life-support & internal accommodations)
    • Standard Falcon 9 launch vehicle
      • Identical to commercial version
      • 2550 kg total payload capacity to ISS orbit
      • Human-rated when combined with a Dragon & a Launch Escape System (LES)
    • Cargo accommodations
      • Pressurized & unpressurized cargo capability
      • Modular rack system inside capsule
      • Unpressurized cargo in the “trunk”
      • Can trade mass between pressurized & unpressurized cargo
    • Crew accommodations
      • Up to 7 crew per flight
      • Can trade mass between crew & cargo
    Space Exploration Technologies Corporation Oct. 2, 2008
  • 15. COTS Concept of Operations Oct. 2, 2008 Space Exploration Technologies Corporation Spacex.com
  • 16. The COTS system will carry >2550 kg of cargo to ISS (plus 1290 kg performance & growth margin) >6000 kg payload with F9 Block 2 (late 2010  ) Space Exploration Technologies Corporation Oct. 2, 2008
  • 17.
    • Demo C1 , Q2 2009 – Core Functionality Only
      • Very basic, up & back functionality
      • Tests fundamentals and puts an early success on the books
    • Demo C2 , Q4 2009 – ISS Fly-By
      • Approaches to within 10 km of ISS
      • Establishes command & telemetry cross-link
      • Demonstrates commanding by ISS crew
    • Demo C3 , Q1 2010 – ISS Berthing
      • ISS Proximity Operations, capture and berthing demo
      • Return cargo safely to Earth
      • Establishes system as operational
    • If funding for Crew Capability is turned on in 2010:
    • Demo D1 , 2011 – Unmanned high altitude abort
      • Verifies abort and recovery systems & operations
    • Demo D2 , 2011 – Crew transport to ISS (three crew)
      • Cargo mission will have proven ISS rendezvous and berthing operations
      • A “light” flight crew (3) and minimal cargo to provide max delta-V and life support margins
    • Demo D3 , 2012 – Crew transport to ISS (seven crew)
      • Verifies ability to transport full complement of crew
    Space Exploration Technologies Corporation Oct. 2, 2008 Crew Demos are contingent upon additional “Capability D” funding
  • 18.
    • Ground swell of interest in Dragon amongst the following communities:
      • Biotech/biomedical research
        • Flying on C2 Demo mission
      • Instrument & sensor developers
      • Materials & space environments researchers
      • Life sciences
      • Microgravity research
      • Radiation effects research
      • Shuttle/ISS experimenters (without other flight opportunities)
      • Earth sciences (short-duration LEO missions)
      • Sounding rocket community
      • Space physics & relativity
    Space Exploration Technologies Corporation Oct. 2, 2008 Image credit: NASA We have customers interested in flying payloads on Dragon without going to ISS  Multi-manifesting opportunities
  • 19.
    • Benefits:
      • Highly responsive payload hosting (5mth typical integration)
      • Both pressurized and unpressurized accommodations available
        • Shirt-sleeve pressurized environment for electronics
        • Feed-throughs to Sensor Bay or trunk if needed
        • Host electronics inside & sensors/apertures outside
      • Capsule Payloads are recoverable
      • Sensor Bay provides some recoverable, unpressurized volume - 0.1 m 3 (4 ft 3 )
        • For sensors, collectors, witness plates etc. that need the exposure to space but also recovery
      • Can host large unpressurized payloads in trunk (>14 m 3 payload; 3.5 m dia.)
      • Can deploy spacecraft from the trunk (separation signal available)
      • Power, data & thermal payload services are available
      • Streamlined (SpaceX) Payload Safety Review requirements
      • Flight test & raise TRL of Instruments & Sensors
      • No need to develop a spacecraft bus to test an instrument in space
      • Available at a fraction of the mission cost – price structure still TBD
    • Firm flight opportunities starting in 2010
      • Project 2 missions per year
    Space Exploration Technologies Corporation Oct. 2, 2008 Actively soliciting input from potential Payload users – Nov 6 User’s Conference
  • 20. Preliminary Design Review Demo-C3 Mission Space Exploration Technologies Corporation Oct. 2, 2008 Image credit: NASA
  • 21. Space Exploration Technologies Corporation Oct. 2, 2008 Supports late-load cargo, payload power, data and thermal services
  • 22. Air and water-tight hatch Lidars Star Trackers Space Exploration Technologies Corporation Oct. 2, 2008
      • There is also some recoverable, unpressurized volume in the Sensor Bay
        • Good for hosting sensors, collectors etc. that need exposure to space but also desirable to recover
  • 23. Space Exploration Technologies Corporation Oct. 2, 2008 User Conference Nov. 6, 2008