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Cemist component
 

Cemist component

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    Cemist component  Cemist component Presentation Transcript

    • Secondary Structure
      • non-linear
      • 3 dimensional
      • localized to regions of an amino acid chain
      • formed and stabilized by hydrogen bonding, electrostatic and van der Waals interactions
    •  
      • Non-linear
      • 3 dimensional
      • Global, and across distinct amino acid polymers
      • Formed by hydrogen bonding, covalent bonding, hydrophobic packing and hydrophilic exposure
      • Favorable, functional structures occur frequently and have been categorized
      HISTORY HISTORY Quaternary Structure KOENIGSBERG CHARACTERISTICS
    • Polarity
      • Polarity of water molecules a llows them to form hydrogen bonds with each other
        • Contributes to four properties of water critical to life processes
      Hydrogen bonds + + H H + +  –  –  –  – Figure 3.2
    • Cohesion
        • The bonding of a high percentage of molecules to neighboring molecules
        • Helps pull water up through the microscopic vessels of plants
      Water conducting cells 100 µ m Figure 3.3
    • Cohesion
      • Surface tension (related to cohesion) is measure of how hard it is to break the surface of a liquid
      Figure 3.4
    • A universal solvent
      • Is polar
        • Can dissolves salts
    • Water as a solvent
      • The different regions of the polar water molecule can interact with ionic compounds called solutes and dissolve them
      Negative oxygen regions of polar water molecules are attracted to sodium cations (Na + ). + + + + Cl – – – – – Na + Positive hydrogen regions of water molecules cling to chloride anions (Cl – ). + + + + – – – – – – Na + Cl – Figure 3.6