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Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 1 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber
Chapter Five:
Nondeterministic Finite Automata
AL-ofai...
Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 2 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber
A DFA has exactly one transition from every state on e...
Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 3 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber
Outline
• 5.1 Relaxing a Requirement
• 5.2 Spontaneous...
Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 4 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber
Not A DFA
• Does not have exactly one transition from
...
Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 5 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber
Possible Sequences of Moves
• We'll consider all possi...
Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 6 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber
Nondeterministic Finite
Automaton (NFA)
• L(M) = the s...
Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 7 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber
NFA Advantage
• An NFA for a language can be smaller a...
Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 8 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber
Outline
• 5.1 Relaxing a Requirement
• 5.2 Spontaneous...
Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 9 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber
Spontaneous Transitions
• An NFA can make a state tran...
Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 10 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber
ε-Transitions To Accepting States
• An ε-transition c...
Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 11 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber
ε-transitions For NFA Combining
∀ ε-transitions are u...
Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 12 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber
Incorrect Union
A = {an
| n is odd}
B = {bn
| n is od...
Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 13 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber
Correct Union
A = {an
| n is odd}
B = {bn
| n is odd}...
Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 14 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber
Incorrect Concatenation
A = {an
| n is odd}
B = {bn
|...
Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 15 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber
Correct Concatenation
A = {an
| n is odd}
B = {bn
| n...
Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 16 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber
Outline
• 5.1 Relaxing a Requirement
• 5.2 Spontaneou...
Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 17 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber
DFAs and NFAs
• DFAs and NFAs both define languages
•...
Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 18 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber
Nondeterminism
• The essence of nondeterminism:
– For...
Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 19 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber
Outline
• 5.1 Relaxing a Requirement
• 5.2 Spontaneou...
Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 20 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber
Powerset
• If S is a set, the powerset of S is the se...
Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 21 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber
The 5-Tuple
• The only change from a DFA is the trans...
Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 22 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber
Example:
• Formally, M = (Q, Σ, δ, q0, F), where
– Q ...
Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 23 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber
Outline
• 5.1 Relaxing a Requirement
• 5.2 Spontaneou...
Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 24 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber
The δ* Function
• The δ function gives 1-symbol moves...
Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 25 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber
NFA IDs
• An instantaneous description (ID) is a
desc...
Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 26 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber
The One-Move Relation On IDs
• We write
if I is an ID...
Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 27 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber
The Zero-Or-More-Move Relation
• We write
if there is...
Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 28 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber
The δ* Function
• Now we can define the δ* function f...
Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 29 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber
M Accepts x
• Now δ*(q,x) is the set of states M may ...
Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 30 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber
For any NFA M = (Q, Σ, δ, q0, F), L(M) denotes
the la...
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Alofairi Adel

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  1. 1. Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 1 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber Chapter Five: Nondeterministic Finite Automata AL-ofairi Adel Ahmed
  2. 2. Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 2 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber A DFA has exactly one transition from every state on every symbol in the alphabet. By relaxing this requirement we get a related but more flexible kind of automaton: the nondeterministic finite automaton or NFA. NFAs are a bit harder to think about than DFAs, because they do not appear to define simple computational processes. They may seem at first to be unnatural, like puzzles invented by professors for the torment of students. But have patience! NFAs and other kinds of nondeterministic automata arise naturally in many ways, as you will see later in this book, and they too have a variety of practical applications.
  3. 3. Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 3 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber Outline • 5.1 Relaxing a Requirement • 5.2 Spontaneous Transitions • 5.3 Nondeterminism • 5.4 The 5-Tuple for an NFA • 5.5 The Language Accepted by an NFA
  4. 4. Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 4 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber Not A DFA • Does not have exactly one transition from every state on every symbol: – Two transitions from q0 on a – No transition from q0 (on either a or b) • Though not a DFA, this can be taken as defining a language, in a slightly different way q1 a,b q0 a
  5. 5. Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 5 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber Possible Sequences of Moves • We'll consider all possible sequences of moves the machine might make for a given string • For example, on the string aa there are three: – From q0 to q0 to q0, rejecting – From q0 to q0 to q1, accepting – From q0 to q1, getting stuck on the last a • Our convention for this new kind of machine: a string is in L(M) if there is at least one accepting sequence q1 a,b q0 a
  6. 6. Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 6 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber Nondeterministic Finite Automaton (NFA) • L(M) = the set of strings that have at least one accepting sequence • In the example above, L(M) = {xa | x ∈ {a,b}*} • A DFA is a special case of an NFA: – An NFA that happens to be deterministic: there is exactly one transition from every state on every symbol – So there is exactly one possible sequence for every string • NFA is not necessarily deterministic q1 a,b q0 a
  7. 7. Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 7 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber NFA Advantage • An NFA for a language can be smaller and easier to construct than a DFA • Strings whose next-to-last symbol is 1: DFA: NFA: 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0,1 0,1 1
  8. 8. Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 8 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber Outline • 5.1 Relaxing a Requirement • 5.2 Spontaneous Transitions • 5.3 Nondeterminism • 5.4 The 5-Tuple for an NFA • 5.5 The Language Accepted by an NFA
  9. 9. Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 9 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber Spontaneous Transitions • An NFA can make a state transition spontaneously, without consuming an input symbol • Shown as an arrow labeled with ε • For example, {a}* ∪ {b}*: q0 aq1 q2 b
  10. 10. Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 10 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber ε-Transitions To Accepting States • An ε-transition can be made at any time • For example, there are three sequences on the empty string – No moves, ending in q0, rejecting – From q0 to q1, accepting – From q0 to q2, accepting • Any state with an ε-transition to an accepting state ends up working like an accepting state too q0 aq1 q2 b
  11. 11. Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 11 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber ε-transitions For NFA Combining ∀ ε-transitions are useful for combining smaller automata into larger ones • This machine is combines a machine for {a}* and a machine for {b}* • It uses an ε-transition at the start to achieve the union of the two languages q0 aq1 q2 b
  12. 12. Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 12 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber Incorrect Union A = {an | n is odd} B = {bn | n is odd} A ∪ B ? No: this NFA accepts aab a a b b a a b b
  13. 13. Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 13 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber Correct Union A = {an | n is odd} B = {bn | n is odd} A ∪ B a a b b a a b b
  14. 14. Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 14 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber Incorrect Concatenation A = {an | n is odd} B = {bn | n is odd} {xy | x ∈ A and y ∈ B} ? No: this NFA accepts abbaab a a b b a a b b
  15. 15. Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 15 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber Correct Concatenation A = {an | n is odd} B = {bn | n is odd} {xy | x ∈ A and y ∈ B} a a b b a a b b
  16. 16. Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 16 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber Outline • 5.1 Relaxing a Requirement • 5.2 Spontaneous Transitions • 5.3 Nondeterminism • 5.4 The 5-Tuple for an NFA • 5.5 The Language Accepted by an NFA
  17. 17. Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 17 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber DFAs and NFAs • DFAs and NFAs both define languages • DFAs do it by giving a simple computational procedure for deciding language membership: – Start in the start state – Make one transition on each symbol in the string – See if the final state is accepting • NFAs do it without such a clear-cut procedure: – Search all legal sequences of transitions on the input string? – How? In what order?
  18. 18. Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 18 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber Nondeterminism • The essence of nondeterminism: – For a given input there can be more than one legal sequence of steps – The input is in the language if at least one of the legal sequences says so • We can achieve the same result by deterministically searching the legal sequences, but… • ...this nondeterminism does not directly correspond to anything in physical computer systems • In spite of that, NFAs have many practical applications
  19. 19. Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 19 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber Outline • 5.1 Relaxing a Requirement • 5.2 Spontaneous Transitions • 5.3 Nondeterminism • 5.4 The 5-Tuple for an NFA • 5.5 The Language Accepted by an NFA
  20. 20. Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 20 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber Powerset • If S is a set, the powerset of S is the set of all subsets of S: P(S) = {R | R ⊆ S} • This always includes the empty set and S itself • For example, P({1,2,3}) = {{}, {1}, {2}, {3}, {1,2}, {1,3}, {2,3}, {1,2,3}}
  21. 21. Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 21 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber The 5-Tuple • The only change from a DFA is the transition function δ ∀ δ takes two inputs: – A state from Q (the current state) – A symbol from Σ∪{ε} (the next input, or ε for an ε-transition) ∀ δ produces one output: – A subset of Q (the set of possible next states) An NFA M is a 5-tuple M = (Q, Σ, δ, q0, F), where: Q is the finite set of states Σ is the alphabet (that is, a finite set of symbols) δ ∈ (Q × (Σ∪{ε}) → P(Q)) is the transition function q0 ∈ Q is the start state F ⊆ Q is the set of accepting states
  22. 22. Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 22 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber Example: • Formally, M = (Q, Σ, δ, q0, F), where – Q = {q0,q1,q2} Σ = {a,b} (we assume: it must contain at least a and b) – F = {q2} δ(q0,a) = {q0,q1}, δ(q0,b) = {q0}, δ(q0,ε) = {q2}, δ(q1,a) = {}, δ(q1,b) = {q2}, δ(q1,ε) = {} δ(q2,a) = {}, δ(q2,b) = {}, δ(q2,ε) = {} • The language defined is {a,b}* q0 q1 a q2 b a,b
  23. 23. Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 23 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber Outline • 5.1 Relaxing a Requirement • 5.2 Spontaneous Transitions • 5.3 Nondeterminism • 5.4 The 5-Tuple for an NFA • 5.5 The Language Accepted by an NFA
  24. 24. Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 24 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber The δ* Function • The δ function gives 1-symbol moves • We'll define δ* so it gives whole-string results (by applying zero or more δ moves) • For DFAs, we used this recursive definition δ*(q,ε) = q δ*(q,xa) = δ(δ*(q,x),a) • The intuition is the similar for NFAs, but the ε-transitions add some technical hair
  25. 25. Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 25 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber NFA IDs • An instantaneous description (ID) is a description of a point in an NFA's execution • It is a pair (q,x) where – q ∈ Q is the current state – x ∈ Σ* is the unread part of the input • Initially, an NFA processing a string x has the ID (q0,x) • An accepting sequence of moves ends in an ID (f,ε) for some accepting state f ∈ F
  26. 26. Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 26 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber The One-Move Relation On IDs • We write if I is an ID and J is an ID that could follow from I after one move of the NFA • That is, for any string x ∈ Σ* and any ω ∈ Σ or ω = ε, I a J q,ωx( )a r ,x()if and only if r ∈δq,w( )
  27. 27. Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 27 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber The Zero-Or-More-Move Relation • We write if there is a sequence of zero or more moves that starts with I and ends with J: • Because it allows zero moves, it is a reflexive relation: for all IDs I, I a∗ J I a L a J I a∗ I
  28. 28. Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 28 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber The δ* Function • Now we can define the δ* function for NFAs: • Intuitively, δ*(q,x) is the set of all states the NFA might be in after starting in state q and reading x • Our definition allows ε-transitions, including those made before the first symbol of x is read, and those made after the last δ∗ q,x( )=r q,x( )a∗ r,ε( ){ }
  29. 29. Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 29 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber M Accepts x • Now δ*(q,x) is the set of states M may end in, starting from state q and reading all of string x • So δ*(q0,x) tells us whether M accepts x: A string x ∈ Σ* is accepted by an NFA M = (Q, Σ, δ, q0, F) if and only if δ*(q0, x) contains at least one element of F.
  30. 30. Formal Language, chapter 5, slide 30 Copyright © 2007 by Adam Webber For any NFA M = (Q, Σ, δ, q0, F), L(M) denotes the language accepted by M, which is L(M) = {x ∈ Σ* | δ*(q0, x) ∩ F ≠ {}}. The Language An NFA Defines
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