New Ways to Look at Health and                              Healthcare Outcomes: Focusing on                              ...
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New Ways to Look at Health and Healthcare Outcomes: Focusing on Patients’ Perspectives and Values

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Patricia Katz, Jonathan Showstack, Ed Yelin, James Smith, and colleagues in the PRL-IHPS and the Arthritis Research Group

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New Ways to Look at Health and Healthcare Outcomes: Focusing on Patients’ Perspectives and Values

  1. 1. New Ways to Look at Health and Healthcare Outcomes: Focusing on Patients’ Perspectives and Values Patricia Katz, Jonathan Showstack, Ed Yelin, James Smith, and colleagues in the PRL-IHPS and the Arthritis Research Group Issue: Traditionally, patient health status and effects of healthcare were based on PRL-IHPS Faculty outputs of the medical system have led efforts to Newer trends focus on patients’ perspectives: incorporate patient- • Satisfaction with medical care centered measures in a • Self-reports of symptoms and functioning variety of arenas • Personal values and experiencesExample 1: Fertility Experiences Project• Quantified time expenditures and out-of-pocket costs of infertility treatment, as well as total medical costs• Identified risk of depression following treatment failure and social impact of infertility• Found disparities in access to infertility treatmentImplications:• Current policies surrounding infertility treatment produce huge disparities in access to care and provide incentives for treatment options that produce greater costs after conception (i.e., costs of multiple births) Example 2: Measurement of Disability and Functioning • Standard measures of disability focus on low levels of functioning, such as ability to eat or rise from toilet • Patients experience disruptions in activity long before these basic activities are affected • New measure of disability asks about effects of health on a range of activities, from very basic activities to household tasks to social and recreational activities and work, and allows people to express the value of the activity Implications: • Measures impact of health that are important to patients • Focused on patients’ functional goals • Can be used to target interventions before more serious disability occurs

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