Tri center 2012 csd technology
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
144,034
On Slideshare
904
From Embeds
143,130
Number of Embeds
24

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 143,130

http://www.tri-center.k12.ia.us 142,341
http://www.facebook.com 638
http://platform.twitter.com 114
http://www.gordmans.com 6
http://www.reddit.com 5
http://www.edgeofexistence.org 3
http://www.bing.com 3
http://webcache.googleusercontent.com 3
http://web.adblade.com 2
http://en-gb.facebook.com 1
http://www.petinfo4u.com&send=false&layout=box_count&width=450&show_faces=true&action=like&colorscheme=light&font=arial&height=90} {1253896976|||pingback 1
http://www.i-am-bored.com 1
http://www.tri-center.k12.ia.us&_=1334946515329 HTTP 1
http://contextual.media.net 1
http://odb.outbrain.com 1
http://www.freemathhelp.com&layout=button_count&show_faces=false&width=80&action=like&font=verdana&colorscheme=light&height=21} {2135562915|||pingback 1
http://www.aboutbritain.com 1
http://www.gotoquiz.com 1
https://www.cheetah.org 1
http://www.noupe.com 1
http://www.a-good-dying.com 1
http://funnypicturesonline.info 1
http://www.dipity.com 1
https://sites.google.com 1

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. 2012-2013-2014
  • 2.  Campus-Wide Network:  40 Physical/Virtual HP Servers/Blades  45 HP Pro-Curve Access Points  HP Back-up Systems  HP Switches and Controllers  Sonicwall Filter  Double Check/ISA e-mail and SPAM Filters  AXXIS 24-hour Surveillance Camera System  25MB of Internet Bandwidth via the ICN
  • 3.  Elementary:  1 Terminal Services Lab (HP)  4 Mini-Laptop Carts (Lenovo)  PC/Laptop and an iPad2 for every teacher  1 or 2 Student PC/Laptops in each classroom  Projector Systems in every classroom  Document Cameras in 15 classrooms  Wireless Access throughout the building
  • 4.  Middle School:  1 Terminal Services Lab (HP)  3 Laptop Carts (HP)  PC/Laptop and an iPad2 for every teacher  Projector Systems in every classroom  Document Cameras in 3 classrooms  Wireless Access throughout the building
  • 5.  High School:  3 Terminal Services Labs (HP)  4 Laptop Carts (HP)  PC/Laptop and an iPad2 for every teacher  Projector Systems in every classroom  Document Cameras in 4 classrooms  Wireless Access throughout the building
  • 6.  The future of Ed Tech is “Bring Your Own Device”(BYOD), and schools will more than likely move awayfrom providing devices for students sooner than later.While BYOD is far too radical for many school districtsat this time, it is inevitable that this is the future. Thesooner districts embrace this future and begin to planfor it, the more effective this transition will be. . . . How are we going to continue to truly ban all ofthis “student owned” technology in schools?  Posted by Scott Meech on Ed Tech website (May 22, 2011)
  • 7.  BYOD isn’t about the devices themselves—kids bring ina variety of technology—it’s about creating constructivechange in teaching practices, just like kids bringing pencilsto school . . . they bring their technology to help themwhenever it is appropriate.  Tim Clark, Instructional Technology Specialist, Forsyth County Schools While BYOD is not a simple means of getting to one-to-one, it is still the only viable, long-term solution. Are yougoing to let the challenges stop BYOD from coming toyour district? By 2015, it will happen.  Elliot Soloway, Professor at University of Michigan, Chair of ISTE SIGML
  • 8.  . . . Technology leaders at BYOD schools say, a fear ofproblems such as access to inappropriate online content,digitally enhanced cheating, and rampant classroomdistractions can lead districts to overthink, and worse,overwrite corresponding policy adjustments to stifle creativeimplementation of the devices. Early reports from the fieldsuggest that the simpler approach is more successful. Districtsthat appear to be experiencing the smoothest transitions frombanning mobile devices to welcoming them have undergone aslittle policy change as possible, striking or heavily revising onlyobvious barriers such as districtwide cell phone bans. Theythen issue school-level acceptable use guidelines that reflectindividual campus cultures and treat violations of thoseguidelines like other behavioral issues.  Ian Quillen, Digital Directions. Org
  • 9.  Brent Williams, Director of Tech, Kenesaw StateUniversity, says, “Easy answer: the iPad” Elliott Soloway, Professor, University of Michigan,says, “Ahh, let me think . . . Hmmm . . . I think . . .Personal, 24/7, networked, embedded in your palm:Mobile Technologies.” Adam Bellow, Founder, eduTeacher, says, “I think ofmy iPhone and Twitter as the best personalizedlearning tools.”
  • 10.  Kathy Schrock, Director of Tech, Nauset PublicSchools, says, “Students want to know why theycannot use their own laptops or pads on the school’sWiFi” Meg Ormiston, Professional Development Speaker,Tech Teachers, says, “Students are frustratedbecause the equipment in most schools is old and thetechnology is not personal to them.”
  • 11.  Stephen Velz, Teacher, Swift Creek Middle School,says, “Dependable wireless connectivity and, moreimportantly, teachers willing to employ 21st centurystrategies in using the devices.” Rushton Hurley, Executive Director, NextVista.org,says, “Strong WiFi with minimal filtering, andteachers prepared to help students understand howto hold themselves to higher standards whenencountering problematic material.”
  • 12.  “Each student will have access to a device, 24/7, with internet access. Imean every student.” --Kathy Schrock “We will see more districts allow outside devices into schools. Due toshrinking budgets, we will have to welcome these devices and figure out away to have enough bandwidth to serve everyone.” --Meg Ormiston “IT departments relinquishing control. Teachers are shifting theprograms they use from local computers to online alternatives. BYODprograms will become more prevalent. While it may seem more chaotic tomany, on an individual level it will be empowering.” --Steve Dembo, Online Manager, DE “I would identify three key changes: cloud computing, integration ofstudent-owned devices with school networks, and the development ofdigitally based curriculum and textbooks by districts.” --Julie Evans, CEO, Project Tomorrow
  • 13.  Plan Thoroughly . . . Allot plenty of time for planning—sixmonths to a year is not unreasonable. The planning phaseincludes an infrastructure evaluation. Internet must be fast,reliable and available throughout campus. Wireless coverageshould be as ubiquitous as possible. At minimum, the wirelessnetwork should cover all classrooms and common areas suchas the library and cafeteria. Bridge the Digital Divide . . . Plan carefully to ensure that lackof technology access does not exclude some learners fromparticipation. For example, when planning a BYOD initiative,estimate how many students lack a device and create a poolfor them to checkout. If out-of-school internet access isrequired, make sure there’s a solution for students who don’thave broadband at home.
  • 14.  How many students in grades 9-12 own a Smartphone? 100 or 43% How many students in grades 6-8 own a Smartphone? 41 or 26% How many students in grades 9-12 own a laptop or othermobile device such as an iPad? 129 or 55% How many students grades 6-8 own a laptop or othermobile device such as an iPad? 99 or 62% How many students in grades 9-12 have access to theinternet at home? 215 or 93% How many students in grades 6-8 have access to theinternet at home? 155 or 97%
  • 15. “An institution’s wirelessnetwork must be able to support the use of fixed computer labs, laptop carts, 1:1 computing initiatives and BYOD programs.” --Center for Digital Education 2012
  • 16. “The most effective professionaldevelopment initiatives are ongoing, collaborative, and integrated with daily teaching.” --The Evolving Classroom, Center for Digital Education
  • 17.  Create better digital opportunities in the classroom.I use the SAMR model to implement the 4 levels ofinnovation . . .  Substitute  Augment  Modify  Redefine  Jennie Magiera, Apple Distinguished Educator in Chicago Public Schools  Presented on the use of iPads in 4th/5th grade at the TIES Conference  Jennie is math/tech coach who writes curriculum and leads workshops
  • 18. BYOD is Unstoppable InevitableMobile Technologies are PROPELLING Change •By 2015 every student in every grade in every school will be using a mobile learning device, 24/7, for curricular purposes. Sooner or later . . . You WILL go BYOD Planfully . . . Or not. Your Choice!! --the JOURNAL, Webinar Series
  • 19.  Elementary:  In addition to what is currently in place that will provide a dual platform with longevity and sustainability for the district:  3 New iPad Carts (20 devices each)  1 each to be shared for grades K-1, 2-3, and 4-5 Cost: $33,000 for devices $7,000 for carts Issues: Covers/Cases for iPads BYOD implemented full-scale for K through 5 in January 2013
  • 20.  Middle School:  In addition to what is currently in place that will provide a dual platform with longevity and sustainability for the district:  2 New iPad Carts (20 devices each)  To be shared among grades 6-7-8  2 New Laptop Carts (20 devices each)  To be shared among grades 6-7-8 Cost: $42,000 for devices $6,000 for carts Issues: Covers/Cases for iPads BYOD implemented full-scale for 6 through 8 in August 2012
  • 21.  High School:  In addition to what is currently in place that will provide a dual platform with longevity and sustainability for the district:  2 New iPad Carts (20 devices each)  To be shared among grades 9-10-11-12  2 New Laptop Carts (20 devices each)  To be shared among grades 9-10-11-12 Cost: $42,000 for devices $6,000 for carts Issues: Covers/Cases for iPads/App Costs BYOD implemented full-scale for 9 through 12 in August 2012
  • 22. $Costs affiliated with Apple Inc. are not negotiable,but are most attractive when bundled in 10-packs.$ Costs affiliated with Lenovo and HP are negotiableand can be competitively bid for best pricing.$ Financing can be arranged via Apple Inc., localbanks, or a hardware vendor. However, if funding isavailable via fiscal budgeting then 3-year installmentplans and interest accrual can be avoided.
  • 23.  “Our students are asking to use their ownSmartphone, iPod touch, iPad, or laptop computer toconnect to our network over the public internet.Stoneware enables us to meet that challenge withoutsignificant issues with security to our network.” --Michael Taylor, Direct of Technology, Avon Community School Corporation webNetwork—enabling the move from desktop to privatecloud computing with access to all web, Windows, and hosted applications from anywhere using any device (Cost to district: $15K) Visit: stone-ware.com
  • 24. Continue to develop/offer this hybrid philosophy Implement measures during 2012-2013 school yearthat will drive the decisions made for/during 2013-2014 Maintain solid infrastructure to ensure optimization Monitor the industry closely for guidance on nextsteps in regards to upgrades and enhancements Provide students/families with direction andresources that will enable them to obtain devices andaccess broadband internet at school and at home Keep educating our staff/students/community