Empathy map john

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Empathy map john

  1. 1. Empathy  Map   Susan  Cox-­‐Smith   Design  Thinking:  Assignment  1  
  2. 2. Interview  Subject     “John”     John  is  a  man  in  his  mid-­‐ for=es;  he  has  two  degrees,   Business  and  Economics,  but   has  been  out  of  work  in  the   field  of  Customer  Service  and   Sales  for  over  two  years.  He   returned  to  school  to  get  IT   cer=fica=ons,  with  the  hope   that  his  prior  experience  will   help  him  find  a  posi=on  in  his   new  career  path  in  IT   maintenance  and   management.  
  3. 3. Say   •  Highly  educated   •  Highly  mo=vated   •  Stressed  by  economic  downturn  and  long-­‐term  unemployment   •  Did  lots  of  research  on  educa=onal  opportuni=es  for  career  change  and  advancement   •  Chose  IT  as  it  is  compa=ble  with  his  prior  experience  and  interes=ng  to  him   •  Exams  are  expensive,  but  necessary  to  document  new  skills  obtained  at  school   •  No  prior  experience  in  IT  Management  specifically   •  Difficult  to  document  in  resume  things  that  make  him  a  strong  candidate  for  employment   •  No  experience  in  new  career  path,  but  highly  experienced  in  compa=ble  skills  and  abili=es   •  Very  personable   •  Customer  service  and  sales  experience  make  him  desirable  as  a  manager  or  team  leader,   though  this  usually  goes  to  someone  with  many  years  experience  in  the  field   •  Not  technically  an  entry  level  employee   •  Older  than  most  candidates  just  star=ng  in  IT   •  Age  and  experience  can  be  seen  as  both  posi=ve  and  nega=ve  quali=es  in  a  poten=al   employee   •  Difficult  to  provide  applica=ons  or  resumes  that  adequately  describe  his  abili=es,  which   clearly  cast  his  prior  experience  and  investment  in  educa=on  as  posi=ve  career  moves  
  4. 4. Do   •  John  has  completed  his  schooling  and  taken  the  exams.     •  He  has  passed  one  and  is  studying  to  re-­‐take  the  other   •  He  has  researched  poten=al  types  of  employers  who  need  IT   management  on  site   •  He  has  updated  and  tweaked  his  resume  numerous  =mes,  but  none   seem  to  adequately  reflect  his  qualifica=ons,  experience  and  educa=on   •  He  is  oUen  referred  to  entry  level  posi=ons,  based  on  his  recent   educa=on  in  IT   •  He  is  just  as  oUen  referred  to  sales  posi=ons  aUer  applying  for  IT   posi=ons  adver=sed   •  He  is  frustrated  that  his  resume  does  not  seem  to  clearly  convey  his   abili=es  and  interests   •  He  believes  that  standard  resume  formats  do  not  adequately  describe   applicants  that  have  complementary  experience  to  a  new  career  path   •  He  finds  that  his  age  and  high  level  of  educa=on  oUen  exclude  him  from   considera=on  for  entry  level,  or  mid-­‐level  posi=ons  
  5. 5. Think  &  Feel  (Inferences)   •  John  wants  a  job  in  his  new   career  path   •  He  has  worked  hard   •  He  is  smart  and  well-­‐educated   •  He  ques=ons  the  viability  of   current  resume  styles  to   adequately  describe  certain  types   of  candidates  as  they  can  lead   poten=al  employers  to  make   assump=ons  about  candidates   that  are  faulty   •  This  may  be  a  common  problem   for  candidates  with  similar   backgrounds  and  experience   •  Many  qualified  candidates  may   be  excluded  unnecessarily  due  to   faulty  assump=ons   •  John  feels  frustrated   •  Resumes  some=mes  create   problems  due  to  inadequate  or   uninten=onally  misleading   content   •  Many,  many  job  candidates   probably  encounter  this  problem   •  Employers  are  stymied  by  current   resume  and  applica=on   standards   •  Employers  u=lize  problema=c   methods  for  selec=ng  viable   candidates   •  Online  applica=ons  and  resume   submissions  have  created  more   problems  than  are  solved   •  Strong  candidates  are  oUen   excluded  due  to  faulty  screening   methods  of  employers  
  6. 6. Problem  Statement   Older  students  who  return  to  school,  either  to  enhance  skills  or   to  shiU  career  path  or  profession,  are  oUen  excluded  as  viable   job  candidates  by  poten=al  employers  because  their  skills  and   experience  do  not  fit  neatly  into  current  assessment  standards   u=lized  by  employers  to  iden=fy  those  they  would  deem  to  have   the  appropriate  skills  necessary  to  fill  their  open  posi=ons.  
  7. 7. Insights   •  The  current  economy  has  created  a  dearth  of  good  jobs   •  There  are  many  highly-­‐skilled  and  experienced  workers  who  have   found  it  necessary  to  go  back  to  school  to  enhance  their  educa=on,   or  to  shiU  career  paths   •  Employers  have  difficulty  adequately  assessing  these  candidates   because  they  do  not  neatly  fit  into  job  descrip=on  qualifica=ons,  or   garner  enough  hits  with  key  word  search  employment  screening   soUware,  which  is  oUen  the  first  line  of  exclusion  for  candidates   •  These  candidates  can  be  doubly  excluded,  par=cularly  for  entry  and   mid-­‐level  posi=ons,  for  appearing  “too  experienced”  even  though   they  may  be  just  star=ng  out  in  their  new  chosen  field   •  Employers  oUen  complain  that  they  can  not  find  adequately   qualified  candidates  for  their  openings,  but  this  seems  contrary  to   repor=ng  from  candidates  themselves  
  8. 8. Insights  (continued)   •  State  unemployment  benefits  oUen  require  recipients  apply  for  a   specific  number  of  jobs  per  week  to  con=nue  to  qualify  for  UI.  This   causes  an  overflow  of  applica=ons  for  many  entry  and  mid-­‐level  jobs   from  candidates  who  do  not  have  adequate  qualifica=ons,  but  must   apply  for  anything  to  sa=sfy  state  requirements   •  Key  word  search  employment  soUware  is  rarely  adequate  to  assess   resumes  and  applica=ons,  but  is  currently  the  most  common  way  of   assessing  candidates  ini=ally  for  professional  or  semi-­‐professional   posi=ons   •  Standard  resume  formats  are  oUen  difficult  to  assess  when   candidates  have  mul=ple  educa=onal  creden=als  and/or  career   paths   •  When  a  person  pursues  further  educa=on  to  change  or  enhance   their  career  path,  they  are  oUen  penalized  for  inconsistency,  rather   than  for  seeking  more  viable  op=ons  in  the  down  economy  

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